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  #1  
Old 09-19-2006, 04:59 AM
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Long Live The Smle


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The smle is my favourite rifle.I have two No1Mk3s,One a 303 in mint cond 1945,and the other a 1923 303/25.I have just bought another 303,this one is a savage No4Mk1.Its mint,unissued.Long live the smle
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  #2  
Old 09-19-2006, 06:53 AM
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I love em too mate - they are a much loved rifle not only to me personally through the usage they got with family members both in Australia and Britain during the wars but also for what they represent in this country - if there were any rifle that epitomised being Australian it is the SMLE - particularly those that were built and turned out here near me in Lithgow.

As I said in the other thread, I'll be buying an SMLE as soon as I get my liscencing sorted out and join up with the SSAA. Since I've been out of the loop for many years can you tell me what they roughly sell for these days? I am hoping to get a sniper version ( picture below ) as well as the stock MKIII.




Last edited by Tikirocker; 09-19-2006 at 07:35 AM.
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  #3  
Old 09-19-2006, 01:18 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tikirocker
I love em too mate - they are a much loved rifle not only to me personally through the usage they got with family members both in Australia and Britain during the wars but also for what they represent in this country - if there were any rifle that epitomised being Australian it is the SMLE - particularly those that were built and turned out here near me in Lithgow.

As I said in the other thread, I'll be buying an SMLE as soon as I get my liscencing sorted out and join up with the SSAA. Since I've been out of the loop for many years can you tell me what they roughly sell for these days? I am hoping to get a sniper version ( picture below ) as well as the stock MKIII.



Have fun finding a smle sniper mate,there getting very hard to find and are pulling big dollars,Around $3000 plus.Mint smles are still around and you will pay anything up to $500.Run of the mill used ones range from $50 to $300.
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  #4  
Old 09-20-2006, 12:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wharf
Have fun finding a smle sniper mate,there getting very hard to find and are pulling big dollars,Around $3000 plus.Mint smles are still around and you will pay anything up to $500.Run of the mill used ones range from $50 to $300.

Good to know mate, cheers ... are there any dealers you would recommend or good sources for gun sales that you know of that deal with SMLE's generally?
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  #5  
Old 09-24-2006, 03:05 AM
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Good to see more SMLE fans here I do 99% of all my shooting with a No 1 MkIII, all stock original as issue. Won't see many people out hunting with stock military rifles but my group of friends and I use a mix of SMLE's Mauser's and even a Mosin Nagant with great success. Here's a couple of goats I bagged last holidays with my mates in the New England region.
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Last edited by Kamate; 09-24-2006 at 03:07 AM.
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  #6  
Old 09-24-2006, 03:19 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kamate
Good to see more SMLE fans here I do 99% of all my shooting with a No 1 MkIII, all stock original as issue. Won't see many people out hunting with stock military rifles but my group of friends and I use a mix of SMLE's Mauser's and even a Mosin Nagant with great success. Here's a couple of goats I bagged last holidays with my mates in the New England region.
G'day Kamate!

Nice to hear from someone in Armidale - my grandfather and great great grandparent were Armidale residents back in the old days! Another mate of mine in Qld goes to Armidale for yearly WW2 re-enactments since the country looks more European.

I am just getting back into shooting after a long time out of the game and plan to do exactly like yourself and use stock SMLE's for hunting and shooting generally - I may get myself a sporterized version also but I certainly aim to own stock versions and use them as main shooters. I want to add a K98 Mauser with the orginal German stamping as well.

Great to hear somebody is shooting stock 303's.

Last edited by Tikirocker; 09-24-2006 at 03:22 AM.
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  #7  
Old 09-02-2007, 12:06 AM
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Of all the military bolt actions I have shot, I love the No1 Mk3 (never shot the No.4, but I am sure is comparable). It fits me great, recoil is barely noticeable, love the trigger, bolt is quick and without problems (unlike my Yugo M48A and Mosin M44!!! - they both shoot great, just that both of their bolt's give me trouble, the M48A doesn't want to close - meaning there is a problem with the extractor or the magazine spring...and the M44 gets jammed on the part where the rounded part of the rib at the front that comes into contact with the receiver - I wanted to get them looked at this weekend at a shop called Lawrance Ordnance but with APEC on I thought it wouldn't be a good idea to go into the city with a firearm...)

Last edited by Chris_Manning; 09-02-2007 at 12:38 AM.
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  #8  
Old 09-02-2007, 01:27 AM
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The SMLE is my favourite,i would put it as no1 in my book as far as battle rifles go.It has stood the test of time and is still going strong.Sure its not the strongest action.But loaded right it will perform and shoot better than me.
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  #9  
Old 09-02-2007, 02:54 AM
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The No.1 Mk3 is strong enough to get the job done, and the job it indeed got done! Might not be able to cope with high pressure loads usually put through the .308, but I ask myself if there is really that much of a difference when it comes to practical shooting between the two cartridges? They both hit hard and things that they hit stay hit.

Interestingly, the Japanese Arisaka is supposed to have one of the strongest actions devised for a bolt action during that period. Loads that would explode most other actions are shrugged off by the Arisaka. But, the rifle itself is kind of forgotten, except for being eccentrically designed with an action far stronger than really was needed.

I wonder what their rationale was for making the action so strong?
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  #10  
Old 09-02-2007, 05:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Chris_Manning
The No.1 Mk3 is strong enough to get the job done, and the job it indeed got done! Might not be able to cope with high pressure loads usually put through the .308, but I ask myself if there is really that much of a difference when it comes to practical shooting between the two cartridges? They both hit hard and things that they hit stay hit.

Interestingly, the Japanese Arisaka is supposed to have one of the strongest actions devised for a bolt action during that period. Loads that would explode most other actions are shrugged off by the Arisaka. But, the rifle itself is kind of forgotten, except for being eccentrically designed with an action far stronger than really was needed.

I wonder what their rationale was for making the action so strong?
I heard it was only the early arisaka that had the good metal in them.Later the quality slipped.
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  #11  
Old 09-02-2007, 07:18 AM
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Yeah, that would make sense. The same can be said about many of the ww2 bolt actions. I heard that with some No.4 rifles made in Britain that they didn't even bother to complete the rifling throughout the barrel so that only the last part of the barrel actually had any rifling (maybe 5 inches worth as I recall).
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  #12  
Old 09-02-2007, 09:46 AM
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Chris,

It is true that the cut rifling machines in use at the time were not fast, but what you've heard would not have worked very well. You'd have to freebore the rest of the barrel because the bullets would be too wide for the original reamed boring the rifling was cut into. When the bullet arrived at the rifling, the powder would have done the lion's share of accelerating and the extreme rotational acceleration that would result upon the bullet encountering the rifling at nearly full speed would certainly strip the jacket from the core, causing terrible inaccuracy and bullet instability, as the jacket spin would slow to the core's spin rate as soon as the two exited the muzzle. The freeboring would be an extra machining operation and probably would need to be followed by an extra reaming operation, so the savings seems dubious.

I'm going to guess this is one of those military legend things.
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Last edited by unclenick; 09-02-2007 at 09:48 AM.
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  #13  
Old 09-02-2007, 01:04 PM
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I have a Mk4 Enfield that has been converted to 45-70 Govt. It is a pretty interesting set up to me. I once read a book written by Col. Patterson and his use of an Enfield in africa to take a lot of African game including some pretty famous lions. They made real men in those days I guess.
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  #14  
Old 09-02-2007, 03:58 PM
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The way they saved on barrel time was to make them a 2 groove instead of a 5 groove.My mate has a 2 groove no4 and it shoots well.Its been used in the Queens shoot.I have a savage no4 in mint unisued conditin.To tell the truth i can remember if its a 2 groove or 5.
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  #15  
Old 09-03-2007, 09:19 AM
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Quote:
Chris,

It is true that the cut rifling machines in use at the time were not fast, but what you've heard would not have worked very well. You'd have to freebore the rest of the barrel because the bullets would be too wide for the original reamed boring the rifling was cut into. When the bullet arrived at the rifling, the powder would have done the lion's share of accelerating and the extreme rotational acceleration that would result upon the bullet encountering the rifling at nearly full speed would certainly strip the jacket from the core, causing terrible inaccuracy and bullet instability, as the jacket spin would slow to the core's spin rate as soon as the two exited the muzzle. The freeboring would be an extra machining operation and probably would need to be followed by an extra reaming operation, so the savings seems dubious.

I'm going to guess this is one of those military legend things.
Hmm, well I heard it on a collectors web forum several years back. Interestingly I haven't read about surplus no 4's with only partial rifling now that I think about it, which you would assume would be something that would spark a great deal of discussion. I've tried to track down the source but have found nothing. Oh well, must have been a myth as you say.

Thanks for clearing that up for me.
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  #16  
Old 09-10-2007, 01:47 AM
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Cant remember if i already posted a recent pic of my smle,here it is anyway.

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