» Advanced

Go Back   Shooters Forum > Hunting > Australian Hunting
Register FAQ Members List Donate Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 08-17-2007, 02:08 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 549
Spotlight hunting - effectiveness of a clip-on red filter ?


Registered Users do not see the above ad.


I usually spotlight for foxes, rabbits, feral cats, pigs etc using the normal WHITE beam as it generally produces a longer and brighter beam compared to when a clip-on RED filter is attached. Are there any worthwhile advantages of using such a filter compared to the normal white beam ? For example, in reality, is the RED beam LESS VISIBLE to such game ?
Sincere thanks for any positive feedback.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 08-17-2007, 02:32 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: canberra.australia.
Posts: 208
Gday ross.You might have better luck putting this on an aussie forum mate.I dont know how much spotlighting the yanks get into.I do a lot of spotlighting myself and have never had to use a filter.Parlty for the fact i am running the biggest powerbeam(11inch) and there are no filters made for it.Have never use a filter so cant really tell you if they work,but personally wouldnt bother.My light shines that bright it stuns them well.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 08-17-2007, 02:38 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Alaska
Posts: 5,228
I moved this to the Aussie forum, at wharf's suggestion. Figured you guys probably would have more to say on this here than in the General Discussion...

If you think this move was in error, let me know and I'll move it back to the General Discussion.

Thanks!
__________________
Wild Sheep Federation - Life Member
OVIS/Grand Slam Club - Life Member
Safari Club International - Life Member
National Rifle Association - Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 08-17-2007, 02:58 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: canberra.australia.
Posts: 208
Send me a PM ross,i might have a bit more info for you
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 08-18-2007, 01:10 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 549
Quote:
Originally Posted by alyeska338
I moved this to the Aussie forum, at wharf's suggestion. Figured you guys probably would have more to say on this here than in the General Discussion...

If you think this move was in error, let me know and I'll move it back to the General Discussion.

Thanks!
alyeska338, apparently spotlight hunting is somewhat of an illegal practice in America so wharf's suggestion of moving my post from General Discussion to the Aussie forum will hopefully result in more responses. Many thanks.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 08-18-2007, 01:50 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 549
Quote:
Originally Posted by wharf
Send me a PM ross,i might have a bit more info for you
wharf, thanks for your reply. An 11 inch beam would just about fry a feral's eyeballs - no wonder you don't use coloured filters! I've clearly noticed the reduced depth and clarity of the light beam when using the red filter on my 6.5 inch lightforce spotlight and wondered if it would be worthwhile buying a similar filter for my other 9.5 inch spotlight.
My assumption being, animals will less likely be disturbed or scared off with the less obvious red beam compared to the normal white beam. I've never sent a PM before so I'll check out the procedure. All the best.

Last edited by Ross Clifton; 08-18-2007 at 03:52 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 08-18-2007, 05:53 AM
MikeG's Avatar
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 27,193
We can spotlight pigs in Texas so I have done this a few times, always entertaining. Pigs seem to be one of the few animals not frozen by the light. After they've been hunted a bit, they are definitely spooked by an ordinary beam.

I'd really be interested in what colors would work best for pigs.
__________________
MikeG

Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb
Welcome to the forum. Rules are simple, be nice and join in.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 08-18-2007, 03:15 PM
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Mesa, Arizona
Posts: 19,787
Yes, there are some states that allow varmit hunting at night with lights. Just have to check out the game laws of each state.

Have hunted coyotes and ring-tail cats at night in Texas with standard white beam lights. Never had the opportunity to try the red or amber lens.
__________________
NRA Benefactor Member
NRA Certified Police Firearms Instructor
NRA Certified Range Safety Officer
NAHC Life Member

"Firearms only have two enemies - rust and politicans" author unknown
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 08-18-2007, 03:21 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Alaska
Posts: 5,228
Spotlighting is legal in the States for some species, as Mike and kdub have posted. Since it was an Aussie specific topic, I did think it might get a little more play here, though. Maybe not?

Funny. I just got the most current issue of South Africa's Magnum magazine in the mail yesterday (June 2007 issue). On page 8 is a full color ad for Lynx Optics "Light Force" spotlight that attaches to the top of the rifle scope. It has a red filter on it to keep from spooking game. I guess they are made in Australia...

http://www.lynx.co.za/products/spotlights.htm
__________________
Wild Sheep Federation - Life Member
OVIS/Grand Slam Club - Life Member
Safari Club International - Life Member
National Rifle Association - Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 08-18-2007, 04:02 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: canberra.australia.
Posts: 208
Lightforce make some top lights.I own two different size lightforce.The 140 lance is 140mm diameter reflector and is mounted on top of my Brno model 2.There are a few different colour filters i could get for it but have never needed to.It is very handy,I have a battery pack(17ah) in a carry bag and it lasts for at least 4 hours constant before it goes a little yellow.

This is the size of my walk around battery



This is the 140 mounted on my brno



This is my powerbeam 11inch mounted on my patrol,with my mate piggy in the picture



I also have a lightforce 240 blitz handheld.I would say that a powerbeam of same size has a better beam,but the lightforce is much lighter and easyer to handle for a nights shooting.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 08-18-2007, 04:15 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 549
Quote:
Originally Posted by alyeska338
Spotlighting is legal in the States for some species, as Mike and kdub have posted. Since it was an Aussie specific topic, I did think it might get a little more play here, though. Maybe not?

Funny. I just got the most current issue of South Africa's Magnum magazine in the mail yesterday (June 2007 issue). On page 8 is a full color ad for Lynx Optics "Light Force" spotlight that attaches to the top of the rifle scope. It has a red filter on it to keep from spooking game. I guess they are made in Australia...

http://www.lynx.co.za/products/spotlights.htm
alyeska338, I've adapted a hand held version of the Lightforce's 6.5 inch spotlight so that it mounts onto my old Browning B78's scope - with the choice of power from either the vehicle's battery, or a portable Sealed Lead Acid
12 Volt/18 amp battery carried in a small backpack - ideal for independently wandering around in areas inaccessible by vehicles. In short, a very simple, practical arrangement!
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 08-18-2007, 06:29 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 549
Wharf, I’ve got an 80 Series Cruiser and rather than permanently roof top mounting the spotlight I constructed a detachable wooden ‘box like’ swivel chair on a roof rack / platform which allows the hunter to spot and shoot simultaneously. A fantastic set up.
The assembly includes the following features;
* a modified, detachable, height adjustable monopod which has a padded rifle rest and provision for mounting two lights (an inverted 9.5 inch Lightforce Blitz and a 4 inch 55W Navara ‘driving’ light for close range shooting / opening farm gates etc.
* padded arm rests and a hinged table rest (which locks into one side) that also securely acts as a ‘seat belt’.
* a detachable rack mounted on the side for holding a second rifle (eg.my 1956 Brno Model 2, equipped with a similar Navara ‘driving’ light attached to the scope and a portable battery – allowing freedom to roam in terrain inaccessible by vehicles etc).
* an ammo storage box. Note, the chair’s pedestal base was sourced from a marine supplier – secured to the 1.3m x 1.2m x 17mm form-ply platform by 6 bolts, which in turn is bolted onto 4 Rhino roof racks. In short, it’s not going anywhere! The only problem with using the chair set up is the ‘roll over’ feeling when traversing across a slope – a bit like being up a yacht’s mast wallowing in a heavy sea.
I would post some pictures only I don’t yet have a digital camera – hopefully in the near future. For solo spotlighting, I use a detachable wooden assembly mounted off the bull bar – it permits a shooting arc from side mirror to mirror and includes the above mentioned monopod. The electrical socket attached to your portable battery appears to be a Merritt type. If so, they are more suitable to spotlighting purposes due to their higher amperage rating than the ordinary lighter socket and plug. I’ve got several mounted in plastic boxes for different applications. The joys of hunting !
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 08-18-2007, 08:09 PM
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: canberra.australia.
Posts: 208
The permanent part was the only thing stopping me from doing the same a few years ago.But the difference is awesome.I wouldnt have it any other way now.I take 3 mates out with me.Two rifles in passengers side and one behind the driver.Its a much more social and safer way of spotlighting.Everyone is in one place and everyone knows what is going on.One disadvantage is not being as high,like on a ute tray.Its harder to find downed game in longer grass sometimes but if you keep the light on the area its not bad.I have used the lightforce suction cup bar remote and found that during the night one of the cups would let go and have to remount it again.Plus having the handle inside gives you an adavntage with having access for all inside to use the light while someone is shooting.
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 08-18-2007, 11:50 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Fairbanks, Alaska
Posts: 299
I run two Lightforce 240's on my Pontiac Grand Am. They help to keep the moose OUTSIDE the car.
Now, you tell me you Aussie's have a better light, like ELEVEN inches across. You've been holding out on me.
People are always asking me why I got the 9" lights. I tell them it is because I couldn't find eleven inch ones.
Now, where can I find these elusive lights? As a surviver of four collisions, involving FIVE moose, I have what you might call an obsession about lights..LOL
__________________
It ain't what you shoot, it's what you hit
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 08-19-2007, 12:06 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: canberra.australia.
Posts: 208
Hahahahahah,moose.I have never had the pleasure mate.Hit plenty of roos though.The only reason i dont have a pair of 240 blitz on the front of my truck is that thieves like them also.I have a cheap pair of narva flood and spot beams.If they get smashed by a roo im not up for $600 plus for a new pair of lightforce.The powerbeams retail for $250 each.But they are big and would stick out like dogs bollocks on the front of anything.1.45 million candle power.If you are really keen to get a set maybe we can work out a deal.I am sure you fellas would have gear over there i want.Send a PM if serious.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 08-19-2007, 01:09 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 549
Wharf, you would certainly need to have absolute trust in your mates with regards loading, unloading and shooting rifles from within a vehicle. Also, having limited room to manoeuvre and rest a rifle, plus having to re-start and re-position the vehicle if the game moves out of the shooter’s direct firing line would be rather off putting for me. I favour the elevated swivel chair which provides a positive advantage for spotting game and minimises relevant safety concerns by having only one ‘isolated’ dedicated shooter. Shooters simply take it in turns – a step-up platform mounted on a modified bike rack closely positioned to the rear of the vehicle allows quick and easy access onto and off the chair’s rack mounted platform. Each to their own ! P.S. Just read your recent reply ….thanks. I’ll check out your outdoors forum.
All the best.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 08-19-2007, 01:25 AM
Banned
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: canberra.australia.
Posts: 208
I dont take safety lightly mate.I have a set of rules,each time we go out the rules are said again at the begining of each trip.The fellas i shoot with are the only ones i take and i do trust them.Sometimes the angle of the truck has to be changed,but we have a rule that only one shooter is firing at any one time and if the angle needs to be changed it is the shooter that suggests it and makes safe before the truck is moved.Its not hard to be safe,its harder to find blokes who will stick by the rules.Anybody that has broken the rules no matter what the excuse,they never come again.I have one main rule,the bolt or action is ALWAYS open until a animal is to be fired on.If the shot isnt taken the firearm is made safe again.Its not hard to open your rifle and make it safe.I will say though a few years ago i was spotlighting with another mob and this one fella just wouldnt leave his bolt open,i didnt like the idea but wasnt a regular.In the end he put a bullet through the tray of the vehicle.Trying to close the bolt on a so called empty chamber.I had to be held back i was going to punch the **** out of him.I have never been with those fellas again.
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 08-19-2007, 02:04 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Sydney, Australia
Posts: 549
Wharf, I’m waiting on an email to activate my account with ‘The Back Blocks’, my aka there being CHIMBU. The site appears to be quite impressive – shall check it out after school tomorrow if the email comes through. In the meantime, I now know where you’re coming from in relation to firearm safety. Firing off a round through a vehicle’s tray whilst closing the bolt on an ‘empty’ chamber is rather mind boggling – a bit like a work colleague who years ago, when we were stalking rabbits on foot along a creek bed, fired off a volley of shots from his semi-automatic rimfire rifle virtually over my shoulder without a warning. In short, never again. Catch you later mate.

Last edited by Ross Clifton; 08-19-2007 at 02:25 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 12-05-2012, 10:04 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Western Australia
Posts: 140
Red Filter

I've used a red filter for spotlighting foxes.

It was on a 5000 acre wheat belt property where we had a lot of trouble finding any foxes, when common sense dictated they should be in abundance (they were on the neighboring properties that I shot on).

The farm owner only had a .22lr and did shoot rabbits a bit but got few foxes.

Conversely he lost huge numbers of lambs, to fox predation.

For whatever reason - the foxes on is property were light shy.

I took the owner out with this new red filter which does appear to reduce the distance that the light beam reaches UNTIL you spot a foxes eyes in the distance that is!.

With my new .243 & 60 grain pills - any fox we saw (and there were heaps) was dispatched out to a max distance of about 400 yards.

It was a lesson to all of us that the red filter works for old foxes that are light shy from experience.

Without a red filter if you just keep the foxes eyes in the very weakest edge of the bright beam, sometimes they will look and hold still long enough to get a shot at them.

With the red filter, it's as if they didn't know they were in the light!

It proved very effective for the time that I used it - unfortunately it melted after just a couple nights use - coz I had 250 watt slide projector globe in my spotlight!

I could see into next week, it was that powerful.

Cheers
__________________
Madness takes its toll, please have exact change handy.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 12-06-2012, 08:16 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Whitewater, CO
Posts: 446
They are legal in Kalifornia for varmits...at least they were about 25 years ago when I moved out.
__________________
John 14:6
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Skunk hunting warpig Hunting Stories 26 09-24-2009 10:45 AM
hUNTING THE SOUTHWEST J.P. Southwest Hunting 19 05-13-2008 08:56 AM
The sad truth about hunting now Greenhorn Dave General Discussion 25 08-10-2007 05:32 PM
Hunting and Generations Charshooter Hunting Stories 11 04-16-2007 07:07 PM
Red Friday Sure-Shot Military News 0 05-10-2006 04:33 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:20 AM.

< Contact Us - Shooters Forum - Archive >

 
 

All Content & Design Copyright © 1999-2002 Beartooth Bullets, All Rights Reserved
View Privacy Policy | Contact Webmaster | Legal Information
Website Design & Development By Exbabylon Internet Solutions
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2