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  #1  
Old 07-25-2004, 04:33 PM
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Shiloh Sharps vs. Pedersoli Sharps


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Getting the itch to buy a Sharps rifle. Just wondering how the Shiloh Sharps compare to the Pedersoli sharps as far as quality of the rifle, functioning, accuracy, etc. Models I'm looking at are either the Quigley or the Long Range Target. I already have 3 Tradpdoor rifles M66 and M68 in 50-70 and a M73 in 45-70, so I was thinking of going with somthing different in the Sharps such as a 45-110 or 45-120. As far as recoil I feel nothing on my Trapdoors, and I'm a thick build, how much does the -110 or -120 recoil? For now only use will be Cowboy Shoot side matches, and just putching paper. Also what bullet do you recomend, was thinking of the standard 500 gr. Lyman bullet or the 535gr. Postell bullet. Thanks in advance.
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  #2  
Old 07-25-2004, 05:10 PM
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I cannot speak to the differances between the 2. I would not worry about the recoil. I have not fired a Sharps but have tried out some big British singles in similar calibres and the recoil is managable. I fired a Martini sporter in 500/450 which would be similar to the 45-120 and it was OK, also a 500 Express which was a 50-140 basically. I had a .270 with an ill fitting stock for a while and it hurt more than either of those!
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  #3  
Old 07-25-2004, 09:45 PM
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Thats like compareing a Cadi to a chevette.
If you can stand the wait the Shilo is the way to go, for pure fun the 45-110 is way better than the 120, and its more accurate
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  #4  
Old 07-30-2004, 10:43 PM
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Shawn

Both the Pedersoli and Shiloh Sharps are very good rifles . I have and shoot quite often the Pedersoil Quigley 45-3.25 and is very accurate . The wood to metal fit looks like it came from the Shiloh factory and it came with standard wood that looks like extra fancy with great figure in it . My buddy has a Shiloh 50-140 and the 45-110 LRE , put them side by side with my Pedersoli and you can not tell them apart , quality is superb on both . Last years Size does matter at the Raton nationals was won by a pedersoli . By the way my buddy could not hit the ground at two hundred yards with his Shiloh's , he has almost no trigger time ,it's not the gun it's the person behind it , need trigger time and more trigger time . If I am correct a Pedersoli 45-120 came in second at the world creedmore match last year . My 45-3.25 likes the 535 postell out to 600 yards . I also use my 45-3.25 for hunting here in Alaska , I cast some big boys for that job , they are 720 gr WFN bullets , they are also accurate out to 200 yards , I have not tested them any further than that . Lead butt is right about the wait , I talked to kirk ( shiloh boss ) last week about having a Shiloh Schuetzen ( 38-55 ) built for me , he says he could and it would be about 12-15 months wait . He also said he has not built a Schuetzen for at least eight years , fun project . Side note , I would of bought a Pedersoli Schuetzen first except they make it only in a 45-70 .Long story short , both are very good and accurate , go for the gusto and get a 45-120 , you will love it .


RR
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  #5  
Old 07-31-2004, 02:50 AM
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duplicate post

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  #6  
Old 07-31-2004, 02:51 AM
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Allen screw on Pedersoli?

I've been told that Pedersoli uses an Allen screw to hold the thumb piece to the locking piece. That is a very poor design. Most shooters replace the block and locking mechanism with an original to get around the problem. Is this that big of a deal?
Glad to here about the metal/wood fit, as I was told it wasn't that good. Guess I'll have to go look at them up at Cabelas again.
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  #7  
Old 07-31-2004, 08:54 AM
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Shawn

Not sure about the screws .I have never had mine taken apart , been shooting it three years with no problems . Pedersoli builds rifles on the bulk side ( mass production ) where Shiloh custom builds them . The wood to metal fit will always be better than pedersoli most of the time .If you have the cash and can wait abit I would go with the Shiloh .Shootability from both are great . Side note # I do not think Shiloh makes a 45-3.25 any more .When you go to look at the sharps at cabelas make sure your not looking at the other sharps makers ( IAB, peretti ETC. )God luck and do trigger time .

RR
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  #8  
Old 10-21-2004, 03:39 PM
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Thumbs up Shiloh Sharps

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  #9  
Old 10-21-2004, 05:56 PM
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Thumbs up Shiloh Sharps

Hello Sir, I am new to this forum but thought I would jump right in. I saw your post on the Sharps or the Pedersoli. Just got my Shiloh Sharps from Big Timber Montana. The work is perfect, wood to metal fit is perfect. I chose at 1st the Long Range Express but settled for the #3 sporter in .45/110 because of the options it was cheaper that way and got the same options.. It has a full octagon 34 inch barrel with full buckhorn rear and blade front. Currently I am using 525 grain cast bullets but have shot 405 grain cast made from wheelweights. The recoil is managable, the gun weighs is at 14 pounds. Was hoping to go deer hunting with it this year but just had neck surgery so that is out. Hope this helps you out.
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  #10  
Old 11-11-2004, 06:05 PM
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Shawn:
There are three manufacturers of Sharps rifles in the USA; C. Sharps, Shiloh, and Axtell. They are all small shops located in Montana. C. Sharps and Shiloh make the 1874 model and Axtell makes the 1877.

Even though these rifles are more expensive than the Italian imports, they are the best value in the long run. They are custom rifles, giving you a lot of options to select, just what you want and what fits you best. The 45-70 has a lot of advantages for someone just starting out in BP cartridge shooting.

I have an Axtell 1877 on order in 45-90. Check them out at www.riflesmith.com.
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  #11  
Old 11-11-2004, 07:58 PM
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Who is making the Sharps rifles for Dakota, or are they making them in house? There's also a small custom shop somewhere in Mississippi that is turning out some really nice 1874's.
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  #12  
Old 01-02-2005, 11:13 AM
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I have a Pedersoli 45-90 Billy Dixon model. I bought it new from Buffalo Arms in July of 2003. I have had the pleasure to handle and shoot a couple of C Sharps as well. My impression was that if selecting custom wood and features were my main point, the C Sharps would be the best way to go. However, we're talking about $3,500 and up. For $1,200 I got my Pedersoli. It shhots as well as or better than any of the more expensive custom Sharps I see at the range here in in LA any day of the week. The wood is very nice although certainly not fancy grade. Compared to new Winchester, Browning, Ruger or Remington stocks, the Pedersoli wood and checkering is superior. Finer, tighter grain, lots more figure and color and che checkering is definately hand cut and clean/sharp. The barrels are beautiful. Highly polished and lapped, Pedersoli barrels actually have tapered bores running .458 at the chamber mouth to .4565 at the muzzle. This old-time trick seems to enhance accuracy and is pretty time consumeing to create. I've never had a malfunction or breakage in more than 1,000 rounds so far. I replaced the standard sights with a set of Pedersoli Soule sights from Cabelas....they ran slightly less than $275 and are well worth it. Unless you plan on doing a lot of 1,000 yard shooting ge the mid-range Soule. The long range sight does not like to lay flat against the stock on the BD model and interferes with the cleaning rod. So, if you want a great shooter that looks good and functions flawlessly, get the Pedersoli. Stay away from the other imports...they are flawed machines indeed. If a custom collectable is your thing, go with one of the Montana firms. That's my story and I'm sticking to it.
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  #13  
Old 01-03-2005, 01:28 AM
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Buying a rifle is like getting married, better to do it right the first time. Get the Shiloh and dont look back. My opinion anyway.
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  #14  
Old 01-15-2005, 01:14 PM
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I also have the Pedersoli Sharps Rifle(Quigley model)in caliber 45-3.25(45-120)and find it to be very well made. The wood to metal fit is superb and the bluing fantastic. The color case hardened receiver, hammer and trigger guard really sets it off. I would like to get the tang sight later. I've only had it since xmas of 2003 and have not shot it that much. Been trying to get the Lyman Postell(535gr) bullet to shoot along with the Lyman 500gr RN and am still looking for what shoots the best. Combo that I have tried keyholes in target after 2 or 3 shots with 20:1 mix for bullets, among other things. Still have other things to try. I've not seen a C.Sharps or Shiloh Sharps to compare it to. Any other loading info you guys would be willing to share would be greatly appreciated. Thanks........Bob
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  #15  
Old 01-25-2005, 07:42 PM
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Get a 45-70. It's cheaper to shoot & recoils a lot less. I don't care who you are or how big you are, those long 45's are hard to shoot a 40 round match with. The 45-70 fouls less and it's every bit as accurate. The creedmore matches were shot with 45-70 (45- 2.1) and 45-90's (45-2.4). You can always change your mind later if you want to go bigger, simply by having a gunsmith open up the chamber to the longer cartridge, but it is awfully hard to shorten one.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ShawnAgne
Getting the itch to buy a Sharps rifle. Just wondering how the Shiloh Sharps compare to the Pedersoli sharps as far as quality of the rifle, functioning, accuracy, etc. Models I'm looking at are either the Quigley or the Long Range Target. I already have 3 Tradpdoor rifles M66 and M68 in 50-70 and a M73 in 45-70, so I was thinking of going with somthing different in the Sharps such as a 45-110 or 45-120. As far as recoil I feel nothing on my Trapdoors, and I'm a thick build, how much does the -110 or -120 recoil? For now only use will be Cowboy Shoot side matches, and just putching paper. Also what bullet do you recomend, was thinking of the standard 500 gr. Lyman bullet or the 535gr. Postell bullet. Thanks in advance.
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  #16  
Old 01-26-2005, 06:42 AM
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Shawn and vmt_htr:

The 45 caliber cases longer than 2.4 inches (45-90) have a much steeper learning curve in finding an accurate load. They also are seen with much less frequency at matches due to the heavier recoil. However that doesn't mean that you can't get a lot of use and fun out of them.

The cases longer than 2.1 inches (45-70) are not very suitable for smokeless loads. Especially when you get to the long 3.25 inch case (45-120), you will need to use black powder in order to get good results. I would suggest Swiss or GOEX in FF or Goex Cartridge.

Check out www.BPCR.net and go to technical information for a good article on loading these cartridges.
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  #17  
Old 01-26-2005, 07:56 AM
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I had a Shiloh 45-110 a few years ago and it fouled quite quickly. Traded it to a buddy and he had the same experience, couldn't get it to shoot accurately (and he is an experienced BPCR shooter). Brass is costly, uses more powder, recoil is fairly heavy. For my money, I would take the middle ground and go with the 45-90. Beautiful guns tho. I have a Pedersoli 40-65 (a great gun) and a Shiloh 44-90 which I love. Emery
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  #18  
Old 02-01-2005, 01:48 PM
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With regard to your caliber choice, it is my understanding that the 45/110 is much better than the 45/120. There are many experienced long range (1000 yd) shooters who believe that the 110 is the absolute best long range cartridge there is. I don't have enough long range experience to form a strong opinion, but, with that said, if I was going to build a long range rifle I would probably get a 14 pound 45/90.

With regard to fouling problems with the 110, I think these can be solved.

As far as recoil with the 110, you are going to have quite a bit of recoil with any good long range load (525-550 gr buillets at about 1300 fps). For general plinking, or short range target shooting, you can minimize recoil by using Fg powder (which may be the best powder for the 45/110 anyway), lighter bullets in the 450 gr range, and by making sure your rifle is not too light!! 12 pounds at a minimum, and the closer you can get to the NRA limit of 15 pounds, the better (That 15 pounds is the limit for long range. The silhouette limit is 12 pounds 2 oz (I think).
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  #19  
Old 05-15-2008, 01:30 PM
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I have been having trouble casting 500gr. bullets for my Pedersoli .45/70.
I use 1 to 20 alloy of tin to lead my castings range from 500 to 507 in grain weight which while not bad for general plinking and hunting are way off for BPCR competition matches where the variance should be no more than .5 gr. between projectile weight. I use an RCBS .45-500-BPS P/N mould and the majority of my castings come out of the mould .0001 too large in circumference to fit easily into the brass case and the majority will not chamber in the rifle. Any suggestions?
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  #20  
Old 05-17-2008, 03:11 PM
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I've seen only a couple of Shiloh's out here at long range matches, they're beautiful looking guns but unless you examined them really close you probably wouldn't notice the difference between one of them and the equivalent Pedersoli in fit and finish. (Although the 'made in italy' stamped on the barrel is a dead giveaway on the latter)
The annual long range comp I attend out here is dominated by Pedersoli's or custom rifles built on original martini, comblain, rolling block or Miroku actions (copy of the highwall). I have never seen anybody do any good with a Shiloh - this probably has more to do with the particular owners than anything else. Same for the really big calibres, by weekends end we will have fired over 100 rounds and I've never seen anyone using a cartridge bigger than 50-90 do any good, or even hit many targets. I borrowed a mate's 'Boss" rifle in 45-120 the other day for a single action blackpowder match and managed to place third, but it was only a ten shot match. Even in that hevay rifle the recoil would have started to wear me down pretty quickly after that. But buy the gun for what you want to use it for - those big cannons are a hoot to shoot for a while. For fun or single action comps, I think the bigger cartridges are fine. Getting back to the shiloh vs pedersoli, there are so many people on here extolling the virtues of the Montana made sharps, I reckon they must know what they're talking about. But the Pedersoli is still a quality product, and like I said they win a lot of comps out here. Just my 2c.
-Kilburnie
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