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  #1  
Old 05-10-2005, 09:54 PM
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Swedish Mauser 6.5X55


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I was at the range last weekend and one of the regulars was shooting a Mauser. It was such a fine looking rifle, we got to talking and he said if I wanted one he had a good source. Around $400 to $500. I went right home and jumped on the internet, researching both rifle and cartridge. I ended up getting more exited about the cartridge than the rifle! How did I miss this great Cartridge! It sounds about like the perfect mix of flat shooting accuracy and low recoil. Well, anyway, back to the rifle. What are your thoughts? I am a newbie to the old military rifles like this Mauser. One little tidbit I did pick up, apparently they come with a metal disk on the stock that has a series of numbers, and one of the numbers rates the condition of the barrel on 0 to 10 system (0 being new and 10 being the worst). Is this true and reliable? All thoughts welcome. Oh, by the way, he was hitting some very nice groups with it with only a target site and no scope at 100 yards. --Mykal
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  #2  
Old 05-11-2005, 01:22 AM
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sounds like you have cought the swedish mauser bug. it is true that the stock disc does have info about the barrel on it, but it is not a 1-10 thing. it has one section that gives barrel condition and another that gives bore diameter. you must remember that the rifle may have been used a lot since the rifle was inspected and the disc stamped, so this info may not be 100% accurate today. there is a thread here that somebody tells how to read the stock disc.
$500 is too much for a swedish mauser for now, unless it is an origional m94. a nice Husky M38 can still be found around here for around $300. a sporterized swede can go for a lot less, and be a good starting point if you want a sporter, but look closely at the work, because many of these were butchered when they sold for $20 or less. Sarco and Samco are internet dealers (to your FFL dealer) that usually have various models for sale.
a little swedish mauser 101: first, there are three basic models (and some variations of those models, of course). the M94 is the carbine, with a barrel length of just a little under 18", and a bent down bolt handle. minty M94s are getting close to $1000. then there is the M96, which is the long rifle, with a barrel length of about 29" if i remember right. last is the M38 short rifle with a barrel length of about 24"
then there are three manufacturers of swedish mausers. the first ones were Oberndorf mausers made in Germany, Huskvarna and Carl Gustaff (spelling?) are both swedish made i believe. Sweden was very picky about the manufacture of these guns and sent their own steel to Germany for Oberndorf to use for the m94s made in germany.
the 6.5X55 is a cartridge that dramatically outperforms the numbers, and has been used successfully on elephant, something i have not personally done but i have used on deer and elk with great success. the swedish mauser is not a gun for experementing with hot loads. the guns are very strong, but the gas handling system (in case of ruptured case) is not as good as the later mausers, and requires a little caution.
another little bit of trivia: the swedish mauser is one of only two or three rifles designed for one single cartridge, making the action perfectly sized for the 6.5X55 round.
sorry about being long winded, but i like to share my fondness for these guns where ever i go.

monty
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  #3  
Old 05-11-2005, 05:31 AM
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I have had both the models 96 and the 38. I kept the Husq. model 38. It seems the stronger of the two. The actions allow the use of the long 160 gr. bullet suitable as a moose load
Reloading the 6.5 tends to prefer the slower powders.
Nice rifles to shoot . Low recoil .
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  #4  
Old 05-11-2005, 08:01 AM
The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
 
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Have two unaltered '96's and several altered 96's/38's in the vaults. Just gotta love them Swedes!

The going price for the average "all numbers matching" Swedes in this area is around $175 - $250, depending on wood and bore condition. Little extras, such as aprature target sights will add to the cost.

Kimber took a bunch of the Swedes off the market some years ago and customized them with different barrels/chamberings and new stocks. Numrich ended up with lots of spare military stocks and hardware. Kimber had faith in the actions to handle all the numerous chamberings they undertook.

The 6.5x55 is a very nicely balanced cartridge, with bullets weights ranging from 100 gr up to 160 gr. Personally, I've found the 120 gr - 130 gr range to be the most accurate in 6.5mm bored rifles, including a 6.5x257 AI and 6.5-06.

If you want to have lots of fun with these great rifles, leave in original configuration and load up some BTB cast bullets. Easy recoil management (that steel buttplate is tough with long range sessions using full loads) and amazing accuracy.
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  #5  
Old 05-11-2005, 01:46 PM
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You can't go wrong with a Swede in 6.5x55. I've got a long 1896 and three 96'/38s or 38s. Butchered Swedes can range from cheap to outrageously expensive...look around if you want a sporter. I built a .257 on one 1896 that was too far gone to restore. Militarys can go from $250to $400, except for the 1894, as noted above.
Greatest medium game cartridge ever designed, IMO!
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  #6  
Old 05-11-2005, 04:22 PM
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Thanks everyone for the valuable info. This board comes through every time! Sometime this summer I hope to join the Mauser fan club. --Mykal
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  #7  
Old 05-12-2005, 05:27 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Charley
You can't go wrong with a Swede in 6.5x55. I've got a long 1896 and three 96'/38s or 38s. Butchered Swedes can range from cheap to outrageously expensive...look around if you want a sporter. I built a .257 on one 1896 that was too far gone to restore. Militarys can go from $250to $400, except for the 1894, as noted above.
Greatest medium game cartridge ever designed, IMO!
Medium??? Large game are then Grizz, water buffallo and so on.Check out what they use this cartridge for oversea's where it was born.
I would not rate this cartridge such, with the heavy 156/160 bullet this is a moose gun.
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  #8  
Old 05-12-2005, 03:00 PM
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6.5mm Swede is a very good big game cartridge. But took North Americans several decades to comprehend this fact. My wife hunts elk, mulies, and 'lopes with her custom Browning BLR in this cartridge. A great low recoil but hard hitting outfit!

.270 and 7mm-08 can be loaded to 6.5mm performance with ease using long and heavy bullets at medium velocity. Then all you need is a big freezer and steak sauce.
TR
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  #9  
Old 05-21-2005, 02:26 PM
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I just recently re-joined this crowd with a rather nice model 96.

I have admired this rifle for some time, but just couldn't get one to come my way. My last one was stollen before I ever got to fire it.

Someone asked about a price. I am still curios as to the "going price" of these things.
I see everything from $300 on up, and I have always felt this was a bit on the steep side, although it seemed I was the only one thinking that way.

I ending up shelling out $200, and felt I had a pretty good deal.......what's your thoughts? BTW, I don't know how important it is on the Swede, but this one has all "matching" numbers except for the floor plate. The code on the bore condition (in the small triangle) is #2....which I believe stands for "good"...the best I remember.

Thanks,

Russ
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  #10  
Old 05-21-2005, 04:12 PM
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You did alright.

Paid $180 and $200 for the last two all-matching Swede '96's I bought. Yes the "2" indicates a good bore. The bigger number represents the air gauged bore size beginning with 6.50 and going up to 6.59.

The other number indicates it is bored for the 140 gr full patch military round. Have always found the Swedes seem to prefer 120 - 130 grain bullets for best accuracy, especially the 120 gr Nosler BT's and the 129 Hornady "SST"s.
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  #11  
Old 05-24-2005, 05:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdub
You did alright.

Paid $180 and $200 for the last two all-matching Swede '96's I bought. Yes the "2" indicates a good bore. The bigger number represents the air gauged bore size beginning with 6.50 and going up to 6.59.

The other number indicates it is bored for the 140 gr full patch military round. Have always found the Swedes seem to prefer 120 - 130 grain bullets for best accuracy, especially the 120 gr Nosler BT's and the 129 Hornady "SST"s.
Wish I could find a nice one for around that price.

If I could only have one cartridge for the rest of my life it would be the 6.5x55.
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  #12  
Old 05-24-2005, 09:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mod70
Wish I could find a nice one for around that price.

If I could only have one cartridge for the rest of my life it would be the 6.5x55.
I built one for my daughter and loaded up some Speer 140 grn soft points w/ IMR 3031....wow...what a wonderful rifle....I zeroed it....then handed it off to her....she had small one quart milk jugs and 12 oz plastic soda bottles full of water at 125 to 250 yards....when she hit them they just blew up..she is hooked.....I am hooked....this little gun really is a nice combination..about the size of a Remington model 7, much nicer...adjustable trigger...and shoots like a video game....what more could one ask for...
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  #13  
Old 05-25-2005, 01:25 AM
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Have a look here: www.pettsons.net There are informations about the rifles there, but also useful links.

I like these rifles - as a youngster I learned shooting with them. The cartridge is rather accurate, and in fact several thousands swedish mooses are bagged with it every year. The original load was with a 156 grains RN bullet, which in 1941 was succeded by a 139 grains BT spitzer. As the rate of twist is rather short, long heavy bullets are shooting best.

Regards,

Old Shatterhand
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  #14  
Old 05-25-2005, 02:23 AM
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Being from Sweden myself, trying out the Mausers in real life army situations myself, I must say that the 6.5 is great.

We used the model '94 that is the Cavalry version of the huge '96 that is like 10 cm shorther than the '96 and much more easy to handle. The performance is almost the same on the range.

A nice thing to add is that my Military Gun was from 96... that is 1896 - and still active as new in the Swedish military Service. So they was made to last!

(OK - the gun was used to belong in the Royal guards so it had not seen to much action). If you visit Stockholm and go see the change of the Guards at the Royal Castle, look out for the '94 at the Cavalry forces (who still uses horses).

Best Regards
Bengt A Wanergard
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  #15  
Old 05-25-2005, 08:00 AM
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Good to hear from you folks across the pond -

Your forebearers made a wonderful rifle in all it's many forms. Have about a half dozen in various stages of original military to customized versions.

Just can't beat the ol' Swede for great shooting!
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  #16  
Old 05-25-2005, 03:44 PM
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Would two, one for each then be too much to ask for?
The powder this cartrige puts out / over the low recoil make it a true winner
I have yet to figure why it never really caught on in the states.
The long thin bullet sure does the number.
Happy shootin'
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  #17  
Old 05-26-2005, 06:39 PM
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kdub

Like you. I found the 120-129s produced the best accuracy in my 96, even though thise rifles originally fired the heavier bullets. My M70 likes the 140-160s best. I had excellent results with the Sierra 120 pro-hunter in the 96. You might want to give it a try sometimes.
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  #18  
Old 05-26-2005, 08:57 PM
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Use the Sierra Pro Hunter 120's exclusively in my 6.5-06. An extremely accurate bullet with 52.5 gr VV N550 and a WLR ignitor. The deer hit with this combination went down like they had been sledgehammered.

The Swedes seem to prefer either Hornady 129 gr Interlockt or "SST"s with 46.5 gr H4831SC and CCI BR2 primers for hunting loads. Otherwise, the 120 gr Nosler BT's for paper punching.
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  #19  
Old 06-20-2010, 10:16 AM
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94 carbine

I recently picked up a model 94 carbine, made in 1903. I have been researching it (which led me here) extensively but can`t find any info on the stock discs. One on top near the buttplate is brass and is attached with brass round head nails stamped with a "7" and the other on the underside about 4" from the trigger guard is aluminum attached with flat head nails and is stamped "531" Serial # is 13490 except for bolt which is 962. Can anybody tell me what those tags mean? Sweet little gun though the stock has a lot of little dings in it. Shoots great though......did I get ripped off paying $100 for it?
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  #20  
Old 06-20-2010, 12:34 PM
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You did fine, but if you don't want it anymore I'll give you $101 for it

There is a variety of info floating around all over the internet about those disks. Some of it may even be right! Try over on www.surplusrifles.com if that site is still up.
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