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  #1  
Old 01-02-2007, 05:21 PM
CoyoteJoe's Avatar
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Loads for M1 carbine


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The Little M1 carbine is by far my favorite military rifle. I've employed a few simple accurizing tricks and with a low power scope I've gotten groups well under two inches at 100 yards with Federal American Eagle factory loads. I have a new carbine on the way and would like to get some ammo loaded up before it arrives. Anyone have a pet load for the carbine?
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  #2  
Old 01-02-2007, 07:10 PM
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I've got a M1 carbine that I bought new 30 years ago (Sears Universal). Just started shooting it and it's 8 inches high at 50 yards! So if you could pass on some of those tricks I'd appreciate it.
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  #3  
Old 01-02-2007, 08:42 PM
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Front sight needs raised, or rear sight lowered.

Being as the M1 carbine (early models) had only a flip type rear sight with two apratures, if they won't do the trick, then that just leaves installing a higher front sight blade.

The .30 carbine cartridge is merely an extended handgun cartridge and has a baseball type trajectory. Where is it impacting at 100 yds? Can't remember what range the battle sights were calibrated to. Probably no more that 150 yds.
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  #4  
Old 01-03-2007, 03:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdub
Front sight needs raised, or rear sight lowered.

Being as the M1 carbine (early models) had only a flip type rear sight with two apratures, if they won't do the trick, then that just leaves installing a higher front sight blade.

The .30 carbine cartridge is merely an extended handgun cartridge and has a baseball type trajectory. Where is it impacting at 100 yds? Can't remember what range the battle sights were calibrated to. Probably no more that 150 yds.
The rear site is not a flip type it is elevation and windage adjustable like the Garand. I have it all the way forward (down). According to the SHOOT software at the Remington site it would be 3 inches high for 150 zero but I want to zero for 100 which would make it less than one inch high at 50.
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  #5  
Old 01-03-2007, 07:04 AM
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A lot of carbines under names like Universal, Plainfield, Iver-Johnson, etc. combined old surpluss and newly manufactured parts and sometimes these were mismatched. Back in the foggy corners of my memory I seem to recall that I added a bead of brazing rod to the top of a Universal carbine front sight. I don't really recall if that was to make the front sight taller or just because I wanted a shiny brass front bead.
Accurizing, as i've done it, consists of glass bedding the recoil plate to the stock and installing a set screw in the top of the plate to hold the reciever hook tight to the plate. I drill and tap a 10x32 hole in the front bottom flat of the reciever to take a screw which holds the reciever to the wood and glass bed that area also. One can then dispense with the barrel band and handguard or retain them for cosmetics and "free" the band so that it doesn't bind on the barrel and glass that short area of the barrel channel with band in place. That has greatly improved tha accuracy of several carbines.
But the main thing to improve accuracy is to give it good ammo. The carbines reputation for lousy accuracy was mainly due to the surpluss ammo. That stuff was cranked out the quickest way possible, the only concern being safety and certainty of firing but not certainty of hitting. I've found the Federal AE to be quite accurate ammo. I've taken a couple of deer with a handload using the Speer flat nose hollow point 110 grain. With broadside shots at 75 or 80 yards the exit was about the size of a quarter and the deer didn't seem to know it wasn't a 30-06.
I've been without a carbine for 15 years or so and find my once favorite powder, Winchester 680, is no longer available. I have had good results with H-110 but hate the fine grains which bind up my powder measure.
I think of the carbine as an overgrown .22 WMR, same velocity with nearly three times the bullet weight.

Last edited by CoyoteJoe; 01-03-2007 at 07:09 AM.
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  #6  
Old 01-03-2007, 07:47 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoyoteJoe
Accurizing, as i've done it, consists of glass bedding the recoil plate to the stock and installing a set screw in the top of the plate to hold the reciever hook tight to the plate. I drill and tap a 10x32 hole in the front bottom flat of the reciever to take a screw which holds the reciever to the wood and glass bed that area also. One can then dispense with the barrel band and handguard or retain them for cosmetics and "free" the band so that it doesn't bind on the barrel and glass that short area of the barrel channel with band in place. That has greatly improved tha accuracy of several carbines.
Just took a good look at mine. It has a metal cap on the forearm instead of wood and the front band has a sleeve around the barrel so no matter how much I tighten the band the barrel actually moves (rattles) inside that sleeve. I would imagine that since the barrel is never in the same place twice that would affect the accuracy considerably! Any ideas on that? I don't have a flap on the front of the reciver but there is a block that the two spring guides sit in. Think I could drill into this and run a screw up through the bottom of the forearm?
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  #7  
Old 01-03-2007, 12:58 PM
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Coyote Joe
I accurized my Carbine the same as you did,and it did shoot 1 inch,3 shot groups at 100 yards.Tat was 40 years ago,I can't do it now.
My Carbine likes the Hornady 100 grain bullet.I grade them all by weight;3 sets. light weight middleweigt and heavyweight.
It also prefers H110 powder.
My favorite load is 14.5 gr H110,100 gr Hornady HJ bullet,O.L 1.680,vel1951FPS.
Frank
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  #8  
Old 01-04-2007, 07:53 AM
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Thanks Kragman, yeah the little carbine can really surprise folks who think they're only good for minute-of-washtub.
I have H-110 on hand and have gotten good carbine loads with it but just hate to run it through my powder measure because the dust size granules bind up the rotor. I've put togather a few rounds each with 4227, 2400, 5744 and the cursed H-110. Also ordered a couple of boxes of Federal fmj as a control load so I'm ready when the gun arrives. Wish I had it today, it is already 50 degrees at 9:00 AM but forcast for snow this evening.
Hazcat, yes, that is where you want to put the screw and I think you can see how that will eliminate that problem by holding the barrel down to the wood. The loosness of the band to the barrel will not then be an issue. In fact it is good to allow the barrel to stretch as it heats up without binding in the band. I've tried free-floating the carbine barrel but it seems to shoot better with fairly tight contact at the forend tip, at least the few I've worked with.
I don't care for the appearance of those metal handguards and in fact the carbine looks more "sporty" with the barrel band and handguard removed. Bishop used to make a really nice sporter stock for the carbine, never tried one but they sure looked cool.
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  #9  
Old 01-04-2007, 03:21 PM
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Coyote Joe
I have an RCBS powder measure andhave a seperate drum for heavy(rifle) charges and light(pistol)charges.The smaller drum give me no problem with that "dust"powder.I actually have two complete tools.
Frank
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  #10  
Old 01-04-2007, 03:58 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoyoteJoe
I don't care for the appearance of those metal handguards and in fact the carbine looks more "sporty" with the barrel band and handguard removed. Bishop used to make a really nice sporter stock for the carbine, never tried one but they sure looked cool.
Thanks! I will try this.
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  #11  
Old 01-07-2007, 01:53 AM
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Joe,
when I loaded for my Winchester and IBM carbines I used 15gn W296 and a 110gn rnhp. It was a great duplicate for the factory loading.

Kirby.
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  #12  
Old 01-27-2007, 10:55 AM
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Agreed, W296 makes a good carbine powder, however it seems to give me the same problems as H110, in fact, I think it is the same powder with a different label.
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  #13  
Old 01-27-2007, 11:38 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CoyoteJoe
Agreed, W296 makes a good carbine powder, however it seems to give me the same problems as H110, in fact, I think it is the same powder with a different label.
I wrote to Hodgen,and their response was that the two powders are made by the same company and are,in fact, the same.
However,I used 296 for some time and never achieved the accuracy that I eventually got with the Hi110.
???
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