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  #1  
Old 10-06-2009, 07:52 PM
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Question Hunting with a Mosin Nagant???


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I sometimes read where somebody talks about hunting or taking deer with their Mosin Nagant 7.62x54R rifle. I have one and it's a hoot to shoot at the range but I was wondering how do you safely carry it in the Deer woods?
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Old 10-06-2009, 07:53 PM
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It has a safety, you just have to have very strong hands and not really be in a hurry to use it

I don't think that the Russians were too terribly concerned about the matter for an infantry rifle....

I've used mine a few times, no deer, just didn't load it till needed.
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Old 10-07-2009, 01:38 AM
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There was an individual selling modified cocking pieces which had a ring welded on allowing you to hook your finger in the ring, pull back and rotate the cocking piece. I bought one and it works very well but haven't tried it out hunting at the present time. I still see them listed from time to time on my eBay search for Mosin Nagant.

Before I hunted with the bolt handle turned up and would rotate the handle down when preparing to shoot game. This is usually noiseless and in reality is quite a safe way too carry a bolt action firearm. I might add that my rifle had been modified with a scope mount and require a modified bolt handle thats different than the sniper style.

Last edited by hailstone; 10-07-2009 at 01:45 AM. Reason: Additional remarks
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  #4  
Old 10-07-2009, 04:00 AM
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Hailstone, that's a perfect example of age and wisdom! My dad and I have both hunted with his 7.62X54R and with our handloads, after-market stock, scope mount and turned-down bolt, it's minute-of-deer accurate. What I always did (now, don't yell at me!) is carry the gun either empty, or with the safety on, then loaded it or took the safety off, once I was on stand. Your idea makes a lot more sense and is definitely safer.

Mike, if the gun shoots well, there is certainly no reason NOT to hunt with it, aside from the safety concern, which our senior statesman has solved! In terms of ballistics, it is nestled right in there with the .308 and 30-'06, so there's no doubt it can ruin a deer's day. I don't know if it's because I'm buying into the whole "Green" revolution, but I think it's cool to take something old and put it to good use! My daughter took her first deer about 10 days ago with a Model '92 Winchester, in 44/40 and the 2nd deer of my career was shot with a 7.7 Arisaka, back in 1986.

Let us know if you decide to hunt with that ol' Russian sniper gun and what the deer seem to think about it!

Jason
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Old 10-07-2009, 07:07 AM
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I just don't get it.

Unless you have a freezer full of venison, or are too poor to afford a proper hunting gun, I see no reason to even think of using a Nagant for anything but plinking at the range.
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Old 10-07-2009, 07:30 AM
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I had a friend who hunted with an HK-91 (.308) /shrug. I personally wouldn't use something like an AR or whatever for hunting (ARs don't do anything for me... I don't expect I would ever even own one) but there are plenty people who do.
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Old 10-07-2009, 07:34 AM
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why? it's a perfectly capable round if using softpoint ammo.
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Old 10-07-2009, 07:44 AM
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Originally Posted by dmsbandit View Post
I just don't get it.

Unless you have a freezer full of venison, or are too poor to afford a proper hunting gun, I see no reason to even think of using a Nagant for anything but plinking at the range.
Bandit,

I'm baffled by your reply...what is so IMproper about the Nagant? Being an almost mirror-image of the .307 Winchester, it has the power and accuracy to cleanly kill just about anything on the NA continent, shy of the big bears and maybe moose. Do you not like it because it's a military round, or because it's Russian? I've always tried to look at what weight bullet a gun shoots, what velocity the round is capable of generating, and how accurate they are...and then leave all the other BS at the door.

Once the bullet exits the barrel, the target or game animal has no idea if it came from my ugly old 7.7 Jap or a the finest Model Whatever in .308 Winchester...the end result is pretty much the same.
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Old 10-07-2009, 09:14 AM
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Originally Posted by broom_jm View Post
Bandit,

I'm baffled by your reply...what is so IMproper about the Nagant? Being an almost mirror-image of the .307 Winchester, it has the power and accuracy to cleanly kill just about anything on the NA continent, shy of the big bears and maybe moose. Do you not like it because it's a military round, or because it's Russian? I've always tried to look at what weight bullet a gun shoots, what velocity the round is capable of generating, and how accurate they are...and then leave all the other BS at the door.

Once the bullet exits the barrel, the target or game animal has no idea if it came from my ugly old 7.7 Jap or a the finest Model Whatever in .308 Winchester...the end result is pretty much the same.

It's not the cartridge that is the issue. The guns themselves are clumsy, heavy, and don't lend themselves to the best accuracy at deer ranges with Soft point ammo.

99% of the military sights out there are meant to be minute of human at 200yds. Where is the bullet going to hit at deer hunting ranges when you are not shooting military ammo regulated to the sights? I have 2 nagants and would never even think of using them for deer hunting.
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Old 10-07-2009, 09:20 AM
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Well it depends where you are going to hunt. I have places I can go where 100 yards is a long, long way and the Mosin isn't at any disadvantage compared to anything else in the safe.

Truthfully, the same could be said of hunting with my Marlins instead of longer-range bolt guns, because there are places I could stretch out the range to use the .30-06, etc.. Doesn't bother me and don't feel the least bit under-gunned to used the .35 Rem instead .....

Sometimes curiosity gets the better of a shooter and you just have to find out what this-that-or-the-other rifle will do...... with no closed season and lots of pigs, one of these days I am going to do one in with my Mosin.
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  #11  
Old 10-07-2009, 09:36 AM
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Originally Posted by dmsbandit View Post
99% of the military sights out there are meant to be minute of human at 200yds. Where is the bullet going to hit at deer hunting ranges when you are not shooting military ammo regulated to the sights? I have 2 nagants and would never even think of using them for deer hunting.
I guess I was presuming one would sight the gun in with proper hunting bullets and only take shots at appropriate ranges, based on whether they were using a scope or open sights. I tend to do that with all of my hunting weapons, even if they are clumsy and ex-military. The critters just don't seem to notice the difference!

I'm not suggesting the 7.62x54R MN is an "ideal" hunting cartridge or firearm, but to say that you "would never even think of using them for deer hunting" suggests that you have not been sufficiently hungry, at one time or another. Truth is, even with all these incredibly accurate new cartridges and guns we have to choose from these days, they will do very little MORE...than weapons that are 50, 60, or even 100 years old!

Next you'll be telling me a Springfield 03A3 in 30-'06 is a poor substitute for a hunting rifle! The MN is not nearly as nice an action but the difference, all the way around, is minimal.
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  #12  
Old 10-07-2009, 09:58 AM
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If I felt like bucking it, I would have no problem taking my M44 out and shooting a deer at 100 yards with the proper hunting bullet. That's about it though. Where I hunt now, limiting my shots to 100 yards or less would be a gamble.
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  #13  
Old 10-07-2009, 10:22 AM
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Mike - if you go after hawgs with the M/N, don't forget to put the bayonet back on!
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  #14  
Old 10-07-2009, 11:44 AM
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Originally Posted by broom_jm View Post
I guess I was presuming one would sight the gun in with proper hunting bullets and only take shots at appropriate ranges, based on whether they were using a scope or open sights. I tend to do that with all of my hunting weapons, even if they are clumsy and ex-military. The critters just don't seem to notice the difference!

I'm not suggesting the 7.62x54R MN is an "ideal" hunting cartridge or firearm, but to say that you "would never even think of using them for deer hunting" suggests that you have not been sufficiently hungry, at one time or another. Truth is, even with all these incredibly accurate new cartridges and guns we have to choose from these days, they will do very little MORE...than weapons that are 50, 60, or even 100 years old!

Next you'll be telling me a Springfield 03A3 in 30-'06 is a poor substitute for a hunting rifle! The MN is not nearly as nice an action but the difference, all the way around, is minimal.

I do shoot my guns and sight them in before I go hunting with them. I also own over 50 guns and many are from WWII [2-K98s, enfield, 7.7 jap, 6.5 carcano, M1 garand, M1 carbine, M44, M91/30, M38 Swede, GEW 98]. I handload for all of them, and I have yet to see any of them shoot anywhere near the sights when using soft point ammo. Why do you think soldiers were taught to aim at the belt buckle? Because at closer ranges the military sights shoot high, often way high, with ball ammo at ranges under 200 yds.

A local shop is selling Nagants at $149+ tax. For $50 more someone could buy an H&R single shot in 243, 308, 30-30, ect. And those guns are meant for deer hunting.
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Old 10-07-2009, 04:13 PM
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Mike - if you go after hawgs with the M/N, don't forget to put the bayonet back on!
Nah.... steel buttplate will serve as an appropriate club!
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Old 10-07-2009, 04:18 PM
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I do shoot my guns and sight them in before I go hunting with them. I also own over 50 guns and many are from WWII [2-K98s, enfield, 7.7 jap, 6.5 carcano, M1 garand, M1 carbine, M44, M91/30, M38 Swede, GEW 98]. I handload for all of them, and I have yet to see any of them shoot anywhere near the sights when using soft point ammo. Why do you think soldiers were taught to aim at the belt buckle? Because at closer ranges the military sights shoot high, often way high, with ball ammo at ranges under 200 yds.

A local shop is selling Nagants at $149+ tax. For $50 more someone could buy an H&R single shot in 243, 308, 30-30, ect. And those guns are meant for deer hunting.
I guess I have been fortunate as I have a Swede that puts handloads right on top of the front sight at 100 yards; one of these days..... gotta put some fur in front of it.

I did put a different front sight on a Turk but that was because the end of the barrel was rotted out and need several inches cut off anyway; it's sighted in for 100 yards.

The Mosin is acceptable with several soft point loadings; possibly a fluke as I've cut the bayonet lug off (it's an M44) and the only real disadvantage of that is those short rifles really, really, really kick without the extra weight

Anomalies, perhaps, but a little load development, and sometimes a different front sight, and these guns can go hunting.

Truthfully - all the military guns give up to the modern 'sporters' is the ability to mount optics after a quick trip to the sporting goods store. That, not range, limits their utility for me. It's a tradeoff I accept as I hunt with handguns and bows which are also somewhat handicapped by range. Triggers aren't great either but factory rifles these days can't brag much in that regard.
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Old 10-07-2009, 05:07 PM
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I handload for all of them, and I have yet to see any of them shoot anywhere near the sights when using soft point ammo. Why do you think soldiers were taught to aim at the belt buckle? Because at closer ranges the military sights shoot high, often way high, with ball ammo at ranges under 200 yds.

A local shop is selling Nagants at $149+ tax. For $50 more someone could buy an H&R single shot in 243, 308, 30-30, ect. And those guns are meant for deer hunting.
If I were to use the original iron sights, I would simply make sure they were adjusted to be 1-2" high at 100 yards and limit my range to no more than 150. However, the ex-military guns that I hunt with, the 7.7 Jap, 7.62x54R and 03A3, all wear scopes of either 2-7x or 3-9x magnification. Each of them is very capable of cleanly killing a deer at 250-300 yards and I do not feel limited in any way when I choose to hunt with them. Virtually all of the guns we hunt with today, in particular the bolt-actions and semi-autos, can be traced directly to military firearms. Those old WWII guns are not as elegant or as easy to carry, but when they shoot accurately, there isn't a reason in the world not to hunt with them.
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Old 10-07-2009, 09:14 PM
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I do shoot my guns and sight them in before I go hunting with them. I also own over 50 guns and many are from WWII [2-K98s, enfield, 7.7 jap, 6.5 carcano, M1 garand, M1 carbine, M44, M91/30, M38 Swede, GEW 98]. I handload for all of them, and I have yet to see any of them shoot anywhere near the sights when using soft point ammo. Why do you think soldiers were taught to aim at the belt buckle? Because at closer ranges the military sights shoot high, often way high, with ball ammo at ranges under 200 yds.

A local shop is selling Nagants at $149+ tax. For $50 more someone could buy an H&R single shot in 243, 308, 30-30, ect. And those guns are meant for deer hunting.
My enfields shoot to point of aim with handloads. I am planning on taking my 1889 model 7.5 swiss out this fall. I will be shooting from a stand and will keep the shooting within 100 yards. I have sighted it in and can shoot about 4 inch groups at 100 yds
Kim
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Old 10-10-2009, 11:52 AM
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Regarding the unweildy safety on the Mosin-Nagants : I like to recall the answer that the Delta trooper gave to the Ranger Captain, in the film Black Hawk Down, when the Capt. pointed out that the trooper's rifle was off safe in the chow line. Holding up his index finger, the trooper remarked; "This is my safety, Sir!" No safety is really safe.
That said, on the Mosin-Nagant, what is wrong with carrying it on the hunt with the bolt opened just a tad. Only takes a second to quietly shove the bolt home and be ready to fire.
As far as the open sights and inherent accuracy of the Mosin-Nagant go : For years, the lever action 30-30 with buckhorn iron sights has accounted for untold numbers of deer. How accurate is that rig? Were I given the chance to use a lever action 30-30 for hunting, or pick a Mosin-Nagant in good shape to use for hunting, I'd opt for the M-N every time. Much better cartridge, ballistically.
Lastly, ever since hunting has become more of a sport, as opposed to be a subsistance venture, everyone should use precisely what they want to use, within the perameters of the law. Far be it for me to tell another man that what he chooses is not worthy.
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Old 10-10-2009, 12:28 PM
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I guess what really surprises me about anyone who disparages the 7.62x54R cartridge, or the MN action, is the number of German officers killed with that very combination, by Russian snipers. I'm not saying it is as strong or as accurate as the modern guns we can choose from, today, but they are certainly not "junk" that should be relegated to target-shooting, only. Like Mike said, it's interesting to challenge yourself by hunting with a bow or an open-sighted lever gun, or a muzzle-loader. Maybe it would be best to list these old WWII veterans somewhere between a modern inline ML and the latest beanfield special.
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