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  #1  
Old 07-28-2009, 03:09 PM
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Getting rid of a beaver dam


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Got a beaver dam problem on the property that I hunt. The dam is in a creek a good bit off of the road back in a thicket that is even hard to access by 4-wheeler. Don't have access to dynamite (that I know of), so does anyone else have a suggestion for ridding myself of this problem? Has the whole bottom that I hunt flooded, and the tractor is getting bogged on the powerline that we maintain for shooting lanes.

Thanks, Ryan
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  #2  
Old 07-28-2009, 03:15 PM
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Contact your county drain commisioner. They may take it out for you for free.
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  #3  
Old 07-28-2009, 06:22 PM
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You say the dam is on the property that you hunt on; do you own the property? If not that can be your first problem. Your second problem might be the Govt. In Pennsylvania, you have to get permission from the State before you can destroy a dam and you might be required to create wetlands to replace the ones you drained.

Kudu40
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  #4  
Old 07-28-2009, 06:49 PM
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One more recommendation to check regulations. I have no idea what they are in TN, but what you are planning is illegal here. Don't get yourself into any trouble.
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  #5  
Old 07-29-2009, 03:57 AM
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The dam has been created since last hunting season, so it is not an established wetland. I will be removing it with the property owner. He recently acquired it from family, and they used to maintain this drainage, but it has been so dry the past few years that there has been nothing for the beavers to dam (it is a "wet weather" creek). There are no other properties that will be adversely affected by the drain, as it drains into the river, and is stopping up onto said property. I don't think that there are any legal concerns because of all of this, but I will look into it. Besides, as noted, no one would be there or have anything to report, as no one else is affected.
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  #6  
Old 07-29-2009, 04:03 AM
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Cover Your Assets!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by EastTNHunter View Post
The dam has been created since last hunting season, so it is not an established wetland. I will be removing it with the property owner. He recently acquired it from family, and they used to maintain this drainage, but it has been so dry the past few years that there has been nothing for the beavers to dam (it is a "wet weather" creek). There are no other properties that will be adversely affected by the drain, as it drains into the river, and is stopping up onto said property. I don't think that there are any legal concerns because of all of this, but I will look into it. Besides, as noted, no one would be there or have anything to report, as no one else is affected.
Double check with local laws, go online & ask Dept. of Natural Resourses etc.
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  #7  
Old 07-29-2009, 05:18 AM
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Oh Dam

FYI it would do no good to just destroy the dam. The phrase "busy as beavers" is true. The pesky critters will have it rebuilt in no time. The only way to get rid of the dam is to "relocate" the engineers. That may be live re-location or as we love to say from time to time, shoot shovel and shut up. If you sit quietly from a decent vantage point, it is possible to catch them in the act of trimming the forestry. They are most active toward evening into the night, but sometimes venture out during the day. This experience is courtesy of my father who had in the past done battle with them.
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  #8  
Old 07-29-2009, 05:26 AM
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A buddy of mine had the same problem with beavers flooding his property where he hunted. He contacted the wildlife and fisheries. One of the agents brought him a rather large alligator and they put it in the beaver pond. The gator ate the beavers, and when he drained the beaver pond, the gator relocated to a nearby river where he originally came from. Nature curing nature.
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  #9  
Old 07-29-2009, 07:43 AM
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Like the alligator idea, but TWRA would not let it fly, as it would be an invasive species. Matter of fact, just a few mile north last year they killed an alligator that had aparently been released into one of the lakes. Only 5ft long. Anyhow, I had the opportunity to exterminate one of the beavers from my treestand last season, but passed because I had no idea that they would flood so much land. Wish that I had now, and will not pass on the opportunity to next time. I plan on sniping them or trapping them once the dam is at least damaged and drained somewhat, but access is limited for now, as the thicket is so dense that it only allows access fro upstream.

Thought about making some explosive device, but have no idea on the legalities. Dynamite used to be common to farmers, but is no longer accessible. A come-along and some chain/cable would be cumbersome, but is a thought also. Just trying to glean knowledge from someone else's experience.
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  #10  
Old 07-29-2009, 09:48 AM
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Check with your county extension office. They may have a trapper you can use. Here you can trap the beaver and some counties pay a bounty ($20 per beaver tail for part of my farm that is in one county and $5 per tail in another county). The trappers here will be glad to trap them and collect the bounty and sell the hide and the scent gland. Costs you nothing and gets rid of the problem and gives the trapper a little cash too.
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  #11  
Old 07-29-2009, 05:49 PM
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Get a trapping licence "if you don't have one".

Real hard on trees they can be! Oaks have been ruined by them here. They have a "need" to chew on stuff by nature.

Not a good idea to shoot at water(where beaver live). Some unexpexted stuff could happen?

Cheezywan
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  #12  
Old 07-29-2009, 07:01 PM
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I would check with the DNR. I know in Michigan about 14 years ago a teacher of mine had the same problem. He contacted the DNR and they gave him a permit to take out the dam. He used TNT. Not sure where he got it. He was a chemistry teacher so he had access to getting it.
I know he over did it with the TNT. When it blew he almost took us all out with flying logs.
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  #13  
Old 07-30-2009, 04:33 AM
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I forgot to mention, that to get the beavers out in the open my Pa did rip up a portion of the d@m so they would come out to fix it. That's when you give them a go. If you could hang a tree stand relatively close by, that would be the ticket.

Last edited by Gyroboy01; 07-31-2009 at 06:39 AM.
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  #14  
Old 07-30-2009, 07:58 AM
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I constantly have problems with beavers on my land and have tried many ways to deal with them. First off, as stated, if you tear it down and the beaver is still around (which means still alive) then it'll be rebuilt in days or less. Secondly, tearing one up with picks and axes is a real back-breaker of a job. Explosives will work but don't try it yourself! The legal issues aside, you can screw up the stream bed and other things, including yourself.

I have found a beaver pond leveler to be the best solution. It is a pipe system that you put into the **** that allows you, not the beaver, to control the water level. A beaver responds to the sound of running water and this thing defuses the noise levels. They truly work but they are pricey to build and you still have to breach the **** by hand, put the pipe in and let Billy Beaver rebuild the ****. What I like is that the beaver can stay and keep some duck habitat but I can control how much.

http://www.clemson.edu/psapublishing/PAGES/AFW/AFW1.PDF is the site for the leveler.

If you want to eliminate the problem, then shooting or trapping will do that but you said you were near a river. You'll probably find that another pair likes your bottom for their new home too. Trapping is probably easier than hunting but they can be smart prey. Remember, where there is 1, expect 2, especially if there is a lodge there.

I guess d a m n is considered a bad word here... sad.

Last edited by O'Connersun; 07-30-2009 at 08:21 AM.
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  #15  
Old 07-30-2009, 08:16 AM
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Beavers build dams and the singular is dam. That naughty word with an "N" in the end is another matter. The neighbours say 00 Buck is quite effective on dam builders. I've never had a problem with them but I don't know why. There's three spots where they could exercise their talents within 200 yards of the house, and they've been busy dam building half a mile away.

Bye
Jack

Last edited by Jack Monteith; 07-30-2009 at 08:21 AM.
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  #16  
Old 07-30-2009, 04:25 PM
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Mine tended to work 3rd shift. I never could get near them with a scattergun durying my awake hours. Dog on patrol too!

Underwater coni-bear trapping worked in the end. Still have the pelts(not worth much at the time). I'd like to make a hat or something when time permits!

Cheezywan
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  #17  
Old 07-31-2009, 04:22 AM
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+1 for Gyroboy said. A friend of mine has a new deer lease on property that has been neglected for some years. The place is overrun with coons, beavers, bobcats, coyotes, and hogs and some of these are real pests. The place has a creek that runs into a river two miles downstream, so there is a never ending supply of beavers and coons. Varmint control is an ongoing process.
He has been trapping and shooting coons right and left and has popped several beaver. When the weather cools down, the hunters will have reduced the hogs before, during, and after deer season.
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  #18  
Old 09-22-2009, 05:24 PM
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With no beaver to maintain the dam the dam will eventually decay and fall apart on its own. Need to make the beavers gone. 22 or shotgun works fine I hear.
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  #19  
Old 09-22-2009, 05:56 PM
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I had a problem like that, beavers dammed up the part of the creek the deer liked to cross in the evenings right below my stand (i rarely use a stand) but if you wanna shoot them, just sneak around where there working around dusk, and dawn. i would do the last 10 minutes of seeing light, and the first ten minutes. 20 minutes of hunting a day, and you will get the lil culprits.
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  #20  
Old 09-23-2009, 12:20 AM
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Not of any help in getting rid of the dams but a fun read.


The state of Michigan threatened local beavers with a $10,000 per day fine for failing to remove their dam.
http://www.snopes.com/humor/letters/dammed.asp


Michael Grace
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