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  #1  
Old 06-12-2010, 07:43 PM
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need help with cleaning


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i just got a new bolt action and was wondering how this cleaning routine works?

clean barrell with hoppes 9, then run a patch of oil down when its not going to be used, then when cleaning the action i sprat a cloth with rem-oil and wipe it down well, somtimes i use hoppes in the action to get it good and clean, then i clean the bolt the same way.

my main ? is when using rem oil do u spray it and leave it as far as lube or wipe it down/????? i also put some lubricant on the locking lugs and other high wear areas. and what is the diference between gun oil and lubricant seems like the same thing to me. i did put some oil on the bolt but is that nessicary or can i just spray it with rem oil and wipe it down?
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  #2  
Old 06-13-2010, 03:01 AM
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Welcome to the Forum

I usually put some oil and grease on a cloth and wipe down the bolt, the bore and all metal surfaces when done cleaning. I would not spray anything into the action, just wipe it down. All the best...
Gil
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  #3  
Old 06-13-2010, 07:10 AM
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just wipe it down with a cloth and a lil rem oil? and as far as greae and oil what are you using? and also can someone explain the perpose of the oil and grease, is oil to prevent rusting or does it lubricate as well, and is grease solely for lubricant/
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  #4  
Old 06-13-2010, 12:54 PM
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Yeah, I agree with Gil; no spray products in the action...unless you've removed the action from the stock and can fully wipe it down. Bad for wood stocks to absorb that. Not so critical with synthetics, but then you still have the fluids dripping out after you've put it away.

We all have our own methods we like. For the barrel, Hoppes #9 with a bore brush, dry patch next, wet patch next, dry patch next. Repeat both brush & patches until clean. Then, oiled patch, then dry patch. For the action & bolt, wipe them down with solvent patches until clean, then oil patch, then dry. You may want to occasionally use chamber mops with solvent, oil, dry.

For exterior action/barrel, one solvent patch, then dry, then oil patch, then dry. That's my method. I don't use grease as cold temps can make it 'sticky', at least that's my belief. I honestly don't know as I've never used it.
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Old 06-13-2010, 01:53 PM
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shawn these is great answered my? sorta haha. i have a duratouch stock by browning is says dont let solvents touch it i would like to hear if anyone knows about this and i like how you mentiond on the lube how it gets sticky. should the oil be enough to lubricate it? so you dont use any remoil etc. at all.but in the action i dont spray it in there i put it on a rag and wipe it down im afriad if i put solvent on a patch and wipe it down it will get on the stock accidently and wear off the finish
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Old 06-13-2010, 02:56 PM
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I am not familiar with the duratouch. Only that I've heard they are not solvent-friendly!

Oil is enough to lubricate. Grease is typically used for long-term storage, although maybe Gil can offer an alternative opinion?

I DO use RemOil, or Outers gun oil, or whatever is available.
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Old 06-13-2010, 04:20 PM
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that is the one thing about my rifle i dont like i have to be very carefull when cleaning as not to touch the stock, forearms,etc. may i ask when you apply they oil do you wipe it with a dry patch very well till it is dry or left a little oily?
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Old 06-13-2010, 06:44 PM
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Leave it a 'little bit' oily; a couple passes with a dry patch or cotton rag leaves enough to protect for awhile. I live in a dry environment, so if in a humid environment, may want to leave more oil. Describing this in text is inadequate, however!
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Old 06-13-2010, 08:49 PM
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true, i live in a humid one soo.... i do like to leave a little but because i like to know there is somting there!
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  #10  
Old 06-19-2010, 06:59 AM
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I agree with Gil

If the stock is sensitive to solvents or oil, I would apply a light film of paste floor wax to the stock and buff with a soft cloth. That will provide some protection. Too much oil will soak into and destroy a wooden stock. I prefer a very light film of gun grease on the metal inside and out. I have stored lightly greased guns for years and never had any rusting or pitting. Take care...
Oberndorf
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  #11  
Old 06-24-2010, 09:32 AM
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To clean, I remove the bolt and insert a bore guide to prevent solvent getting into the rest of the action. Oil in the stock can cause the gun's position in the stock to shift during shooting, which reduces accuracy. I run patches on a plastic (not brass) jag wet with Boretech Eliminator through the bore until they stop coming out blue. I run a couple of dry patches in, then one oily patch for preservation of the bore. I run a dry patch to remove excess oil just before shooting the gun again.

The bolt gets wiped with Sprinco Machine Gun Lube to help keep the bolt operation smooth. You can put a pinhead size bit of grease on the engagement surfaces of the bolt lugs if you find that helps bolt operating speed or smoothness? I usually do not do this unless I see the bolt contact is good and worn in.

Oils and greases are all lubes, but the thinner lubes don't usually have as much film strength as more viscous ones, so they don't work as well under high pressure. Thick oils can collect dust, however, so your environment may affect your choices. Slip 2000 synthetic gun oil is a good choice for a thin oil that doesn't lose film strength too easily. Some thin oils can also wipe off easily enough to stop providing much lubrication, so they don't usually last as well as the heavier stuff. On the other hand, they are better at removing soot or dirt or light rust because their thin, low viscosity and low surface tension let them penetrate better. It's a matter of matching the lube to the application.

I do not use Rem Oil or Break Free CLP in bores because I don't want their Teflon in the bore. Teflon has been shown to change properties with temperature, so in a match rifle or other gun you shoot fast enough to heat the barrel significantly, it can have a negative impact on precision accuracy. For most hunting or combat accuracy it is not an issue.
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Last edited by unclenick; 06-24-2010 at 09:37 AM.
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  #12  
Old 08-06-2010, 06:36 AM
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If you're in the UK and are lazy you could just hand it over to these guys...

http://www.riflecleaning.co.uk
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  #13  
Old 08-26-2010, 10:17 AM
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I don't know if anyone has heard of Eezox or not but it is one FINE lubricant for weapons. You can google it for their website. You can buy directly from them or Midway USA..Brownell's doesn't carry it. It's the best oil that I have ever used on guns (synthetic). You can also use anti-seize on parts of ur bolt to inhibit galling.
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  #14  
Old 07-10-2013, 02:11 PM
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I only use EEZOX To clean every new firearm & cleaning them after each use with the EEZOX.? As it is a Cleaner, Lub, & Prevents Rust.? Great stuff
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