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  #1  
Old 03-27-2005, 08:48 AM
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Adjusting the Remington 700 or 7 Trigger


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Adjusting the Remington 700 Trigger

Background:
The Remington trigger system is a very good system that in years past came directly from the factory with a crisp and reasonable pull. These days however, Remington is producing triggers that are not as smooth and are liability proof with pull weights that have gotten to the point of being ridiculous. These changes are due to Remington trying to reduce the cost of their rifles and the ever present fear of civil liability from a trigger that is too light. If you are not conscious of gun safety and are not smart enough to keep your fingers off your trigger until you are ready to fire, I kindly ask you to read no further and find another hobby as I accept no responsibility for stupid people. The modifications that I am about to discuss have the potential to be extremely dangerous if not done carefully! If you have the slightest doubt about what you are doing, I strongly urge you to have a competent gunsmith adjust your trigger for you as the cost is minimal.

The Remington trigger:
The Remington 700 Trigger has three screws, two in the front and one in the back.
The top one on the front is the over travel adjustment. The bottom one on the front is the trigger pull adjustment. the screw on the back is the sear engagement.

When you look at your trigger you will see that the heads of these screws are covered in a glue or loctite. To adjust your trigger it will be necessary to scrape this glue off the screw heads and then determine if your screw heads are slotted or allen head. The next step in this process is to break the screws loose and add a small drop of oil to help with adjustments. I normally run the screws in and out a couple times to make sure that the screw is not binding and the surfaces of the screw are completely covered in oil.

Adjusting the trigger:
Back out the spring tension (trigger pull) screw to a light trigger pull that is adequate to keep some pressure on the trigger but is very light (trigger pull will be set later). Next back out the sear engagement screw, and the over travel screws several turns.

Once the screws are adjusted as above, close the bolt (without dry firing) and SLOWLY turn the sear engagement screw in until the firing pin is released. From this point, back the screw out a half turn. Without re-cocking the firing pin, screw the over travel screw in until you feel it contact the trigger lightly, preventing the trigger from moving. From this point, back the over travel screw out a quarter turn. When you pull the trigger at this point there should be a very slight movement of the trigger.

To adjust the trigger pull, adjust the spring tension screw to a pull that you like. As you turn the screw in the trigger pull will be increased and the pull will be reduced as the screw is backed out. I would not recommend going lighter than 1 to 1.5-pounds with a factory trigger and I prefer a trigger closer to 2 to 2.5-pounds for a big game rifle.

Work the bolt several times to cock the rifle and try the trigger with the trigger gauge and your finger to make sure that you are happy with how the trigger pull and release feels and the weight is something that you are comfortable with. I also recommend the use of a good trigger gauge to confirm that you are getting a consistent break. If the break you are getting is not consistent, then you may need to increase the trigger pull or consider having the trigger rebuilt or replaced by a competent gunsmith.

Safety Checks!
After you are happy with the feel of the trigger it is essential that you perform a safety check as described here. First, slam the bolt closed HARD up to a dozen times watching to see if the sear allows the firing pin to be released. If the firing pin is released, back out the sear engagement screw another 1/4 turn, and repeat slamming the bolt again.


Next, cock the firing pin and put the weapon on "SAFE" and pull the trigger, release the trigger, put the weapon on "FIRE". Repeat this process several times and if the firing pin is released, increase the trigger pull and repeat this process.
Once these safety checks are performed, take nail polish and seal the heads of the screws and allow it to dry. I normally try to use two coats to make sure that the screws are properly glued in place. Once adjusted, the Remington trigger rarely needs additional adjustment and can be as good as many after market triggers.

Postscript:
I have recently purchased a new Remington 700 Classic that quite literally had the God awful worse trigger I have ever felt on any gun. This trigger was rough in the sear engagement and the trigger spring itself was too stiff to allow for any adjustment that was acceptable for my taste. I understand that it is possible to buy replacement trigger springs and to have the sear surface polished but these are tasks that are beyond my level of understanding so I took a trigger out of a well used Remington 700 ADL from the early 1970's and swapped it for my new trigger. I felt guilty selling my old ADL with that new Rem. 700 trigger that was so lousy, but at least the gun that I wanted to keep has a crisp 2-pound trigger that I can trust to work as a quality trigger should!

As you can see sometimes a trigger is just to bad to adjust. If this is the case then the Jewel along with Timney and Rifle basic are good triggers. If you want the best of both worlds I suggest a Canjur single set. It can be set for hunting weight 2-4 pounds and the single set part at ounces.

For a big game rifle most folks recommend 3.5 pounds. For varmit rifles 2.5 works well. Just keep in mind two light a trigger can be dangerous. Lots of times even if you have a 5 pound trigger if it is crisp with no over travel and no creep it will shoot really well and feel much lighter than it actually is.

If your not mechanically inclined have a gunsmith install or adjust your new trigger.
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  #2  
Old 03-27-2005, 01:02 PM
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Good post

I read this on another Board recently and am glad to see it again. All the best...
Gil
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  #3  
Old 03-27-2005, 01:59 PM
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i'd suggest making it a sticky.

monty
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  #4  
Old 03-27-2005, 03:59 PM
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How about Win.mod 70 classic.? Could anyone that is familiar with this rifle provide any info as to lightening the trigger? I intended to post this as a new thread, but since we're talking about triggers anyway, I just thought i'ed ask.
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  #5  
Old 03-27-2005, 04:54 PM
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Adjusting the model 70 Trigger

Adjusting the Model 70 Trigger
by Frank Kleinburg ([email protected])
(Original article posted at www.recguns.com)

Let me discuss how the trigger on the Model 70 works. Knowing how it works will allow you to know how a gunsmith would adjust it.

The trigger mechanism on the Winchester Model 70 is remarkably simple. Remove the barreled action of a Model 70 from it's stock and you can see just how simple it is. You will see a trigger that pivots on a pin. Look at the rear portion of the trigger (normally hidden by the stock) and you will see a square head screw (the trigger stop screw), three nuts, and a spring (we'll call it the trigger return spring).

The purpose of the trigger stop screw is to limit the amount of over travel of the trigger. It is possible to screw the trigger stop screw in far enough that you will not be able to pull the trigger enough to release the sear. Ideally the trigger stop screw should be screwed in as far as it can and still have enough trigger movement to reliably release the sear. This will allow for the greatest amount of adjustment of the trigger spring tension.

Tension on the trigger return spring determines a majority of the trigger pull weight (the rest of the trigger pull weight comes from the friction between the trigger and the sear). The spring surrounds the trigger stop screw, both can be seen just behind the trigger. The trigger stop screw is held in place by a pair of captive nuts, one on each side of the part of the trigger the stop screw passes through. A third nut sets the tension on the trigger spring. Tightening this third nut (turning it clockwise) against the trigger spring will increase the trigger pull. And turning it counter clockwise will decrease the trigger pull weight.

After making any adjustments, be absolutely sure to test for an excessively light trigger. To do this, screw the barreled action back in the stock. With the bolt cocked, in the closed position on an empty chamber, and the safety off, butt down the rifle. That is hold the rifle barrel pointing upward, let the butt bounce on the ground. It should take a considerable bump to cause the firing pin to drop (on the empty chamber).

On a friend's pre-64 Model 70 trigger, the spring had to be changed because enough of the trigger spring pretension could not be removed to get an acceptable trigger pull weight. Yet on another (on one of those new classic actions), it was possible to remove ALL of the trigger spring pretension. This is a dangerous situation because only the trigger to sear tension keeps the cocked rifle from firing.
Well I hope you now have a better understanding of how a Model 70 trigger works. Of course for all trigger pull weight adjustments you should take your rifle to a reputable gunsmith.
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  #6  
Old 03-27-2005, 05:04 PM
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It's been stuck

Model 70 - dirt simple to adjust pull weight. Two thin, flat, quarter-inch wrenches to adjust the trigger return spring compression. That's it unless you want to monkey with the sear engagement surfaces, normally not needed.

Bob, I merged the two trigger adjustment threads. Seemed appropriate.....
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  #7  
Old 03-27-2005, 09:25 PM
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thanks Mike, I should have made it one entry. Didn't think about it til another fella ask about the Winchester's
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  #8  
Old 04-10-2005, 04:43 PM
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Bob, what would the gunsmithing thread be without you? YOU DA MAN!
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  #9  
Old 12-19-2005, 01:04 PM
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Just read your old post on trigger adjustment for the Rem 700 & Win 70.
Great guide line, I just used it fort the first time to adjust a new Rem.
No creep, no lag, and breaks clean at about 2.5-3 lbs. Thanks a lot
Now, I'll go to the well again!
Do you have anything on the new Vanguard? I have found myself owning one.
Thx again
Tom
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  #10  
Old 01-05-2006, 02:00 PM
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I just adjusted my trigger, I don't recommend adjusting the overtravel... any movement of the overtravel screw caused my trigger to lock up on a new ADL. In any case, its tension is adjusted now and is much better than the factory 7lb setting. Thanks for the write up.
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  #11  
Old 02-19-2006, 11:30 PM
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trigger

Faucettb,
I have adjusted my M 70 trigger but I'm thinking about replacing it with a timney, do you think it's worth it? I can get timney for about $70.00. I haven't had a timney before.
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Old 02-20-2006, 04:51 AM
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I have a Timney in my stevens and it is nice, but I would say its no nicer than the factory trigger in my M70 since it was adjusted
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  #13  
Old 02-20-2006, 06:07 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by goldbelt
Faucettb,
I have adjusted my M 70 trigger but I'm thinking about replacing it with a timney, do you think it's worth it? I can get timney for about $70.00. I haven't had a timney before.

I had a Timney in a Model 70 and it was much better than factory. I had it down to about 14 oz.. I doubt the factory trigger will get close to that, even with adjustments.
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  #14  
Old 02-20-2006, 11:50 AM
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I guess it depends what you are looking to do with the gun, 14 oz is a little light for hunting
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Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more,
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  #15  
Old 02-20-2006, 02:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jb12string
I guess it depends what you are looking to do with the gun, 14 oz is a little light for hunting
All of my varmit rifles triggers are set at 16oz. or less. Thats just what I am used to.
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  #16  
Old 02-20-2006, 06:48 PM
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should have clarifed, I meant big game rifles, a sub pound trigger makes sense on a varmint rifle
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  #17  
Old 02-20-2006, 08:16 PM
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thanks for the input. I think I'll try to lighten the pull a little more and see how that works. I need to get a trigger pull scale. I just lightened it a little without a scale after I bought it. Then I bought a Kimber montana .325 wsm and the trigger was sweet so now I want the m 70 the same way. If that doesn't do it then I'll try the timney.
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  #18  
Old 03-26-2006, 07:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb
Adjusting the Model 70 Trigger
by Frank Kleinburg ([email protected])
(Original article posted at www.recguns.com)

Let me discuss how the trigger on the Model 70 works. Knowing how it works will allow you to know how a gunsmith would adjust it.

The trigger mechanism on the Winchester Model 70 is remarkably simple. Remove the barreled action of a Model 70 from it's stock and you can see just how simple it is. You will see a trigger that pivots on a pin. Look at the rear portion of the trigger (normally hidden by the stock) and you will see a square head screw (the trigger stop screw), three nuts, and a spring (we'll call it the trigger return spring).

The purpose of the trigger stop screw is to limit the amount of over travel of the trigger. It is possible to screw the trigger stop screw in far enough that you will not be able to pull the trigger enough to release the sear. Ideally the trigger stop screw should be screwed in as far as it can and still have enough trigger movement to reliably release the sear. This will allow for the greatest amount of adjustment of the trigger spring tension.

Tension on the trigger return spring determines a majority of the trigger pull weight (the rest of the trigger pull weight comes from the friction between the trigger and the sear). The spring surrounds the trigger stop screw, both can be seen just behind the trigger. The trigger stop screw is held in place by a pair of captive nuts, one on each side of the part of the trigger the stop screw passes through. A third nut sets the tension on the trigger spring. Tightening this third nut (turning it clockwise) against the trigger spring will increase the trigger pull. And turning it counter clockwise will decrease the trigger pull weight.

After making any adjustments, be absolutely sure to test for an excessively light trigger. To do this, screw the barreled action back in the stock. With the bolt cocked, in the closed position on an empty chamber, and the safety off, butt down the rifle. That is hold the rifle barrel pointing upward, let the butt bounce on the ground. It should take a considerable bump to cause the firing pin to drop (on the empty chamber).

On a friend's pre-64 Model 70 trigger, the spring had to be changed because enough of the trigger spring pretension could not be removed to get an acceptable trigger pull weight. Yet on another (on one of those new classic actions), it was possible to remove ALL of the trigger spring pretension. This is a dangerous situation because only the trigger to sear tension keeps the cocked rifle from firing.
Well I hope you now have a better understanding of how a Model 70 trigger works. Of course for all trigger pull weight adjustments you should take your rifle to a reputable gunsmith.
Bob, Thx again for all the useful info.
I've done one Vanguard already but lost the printed guidelines. I nned to do another Vanguard.
Is it the same as the model 70?
I can't seem to remember.
Thx Tom
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  #19  
Old 05-19-2006, 07:39 PM
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I take all my new rifles to a benchrest gunsmth immediately after purchase for glass bedding, barrel floating and trigger adjustments. The gunsmith has told me that recently Remington has made some changes to their trigger units. He formerly got them down to 2 lbs, with no dificulty. He says now we're barely getting them down to thee pounds. Best wishes.

Cal - Montreal
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  #20  
Old 07-20-2006, 07:17 PM
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I just got my new Model 70 Classic tonight. The trigger was very heavy (as set at the factory). Using the directions on this post, I adjusted it to a bit under 4. Perfect for hunting. Very smooth now. Very nice for a factory trigger. Thx for the post.
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