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  #1  
Old 06-16-2005, 08:41 PM
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"Grind to fit" recoil pads


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How hard are they to install? I have a Marlin 336rc that has a poor recoil pad on it. Gunsmiths want a $100 for pad and installation.
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  #2  
Old 06-16-2005, 10:01 PM
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If you have a belt sander or a hand grinder and watch what you're doing, it can easily be installed. Don't fall for the "pre-fit" pads - have yet to find one that was properly sized for the intended stock. Measure your butt (with old pad removed) for length from top to toe and the largest width. Order the pad that is nearest in larger size.

Don't worry about the screw holes aligning perfectly. The old holes can always be filled with epoxy coated or Elmer's glue coated wooden dowel rods hammered into the holes and new ones drilled after the glue has hardened.

The buttstock needs to be sanded flat to match the new pad. After drilling the screw holes (or, using the old ones if they match), slather the butt with epoxy and install the pad, tighten the screws down tight. A little trick here - instructions come with the pad and pay attention to the one telling you to lube the shaft of the screwdriver being used. This saves from having those big unslghtly holes in the pad face.

Carefully wrap masking tape around the stock under the pad and begin to sand the pad to fit the contours of the stock. Pay attention to continue the straight lines of the comb and the toe with the pad. When you've shaped the pad down to where the tape is starting to show wear, stop with the power tools and finish off by hand with a sanding block and fine grit wet/dry paper. The instructions will also tell you to polish the plastic portion of the pad using gun oil with the fine grit. I've found that a felt pad and J-B bore compound work wonders.

Patience is the rule installing a pad - don't get in a hurry or you'll ruin it. Not all that difficult, but does make a mess to clean up.
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  #3  
Old 06-17-2005, 05:53 AM
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Kdub is a genius and didn't miss a trick for a professional installation. I'm going to send him all of mine!

My local gunsmith is a friend of mine. We trade out a little work so I get to tinker around his shop. I've watched him install a few pads. The only difference between his method and Kdub's is, he uses a jig. The jig allows him to sand the pad down to a good fit with less risk of nicking the wood.

I think he charges $65.00 labor.
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  #4  
Old 06-17-2005, 10:31 AM
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lumberjack,

Your local gunsmith earns every bit of that $65.00. The grinding to fit isn't bad, it's the clean up afterwards that I don't like. I tried the jig method once, and prefer the method used by kdub. Took one down with rasps, files and sand paper one time, and don't intend to do that again unless I absolutley have to.

kdub, when installing one on a butstock with a through bolt, try double sided tape under the pad, it sure keeps the pad from creeping on you, and makes stock removal and installation easier.

Lee L.
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  #5  
Old 06-17-2005, 03:38 PM
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By Gollies, Lee -

The thought of a through-bolt, such as on two piece stocks never entered my mind! You're right, best NOT to expoxy those pads! Thanks for the double sticky tape idea. Makes sense to me!
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  #6  
Old 06-17-2005, 09:57 PM
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I personally like a 12 inch disc sander with the plate set at 90 degrees to the sander. It is much easier than free handing the stock and a new pad against a large belt sander or a sander grinder turning at high speed when you have a solid rest to work against the sander.

Use a double layer of 2inch blue masking tape and go 3 or 4 inches up the stock or til you get to the cheek piece.

Once you get down to just sanding the tape go to an electric hand sander and put the stock in a padded vice. I like to cut the stock off if it needs shortening with a bandsaw and a fine toothed blade. A table saw can chip a nick out of the stock at the end of the cut. I leave about a 1/16 inch or just a little more and use the big disc sander to smooth and even up the end of the stock.

I do not use epoxy or double sided tape in case it is a two piece stock or in case I need to change out the pad later. It's much easier to unscrew and replace it if is not glued on. I like to put a little petroleum jelly on the screwdriver bit so it slips in the pad holes easly. Use as small a screwdriver as you can that still fits the screw head. Once you have the screw heads marked and drilled turn the screws in without the pad on, then they are much easier to put in when you put the pad on.

Like kdub says it is so important to keep the pad having the exact same lines as the stock especially on the toe and heel of the pad and not mess up the stock finish.

To tell the truth when your talking about a 400/500/600 dollar weapon that your gonna have and hold and shoot a long time I've found it much better to take to someone whom knows what their doing than take the chance of messing up a fine weapon. Another thing that often happens is you do install your own pad and later want to sell that weapon and the pad does not look very nice, what do you think happens to the resale value of that gun?

It's kinda like painting a fine picture, anyone can buy the brushes, canves, paints and brushes, but few can really paint nice pictures.
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Last edited by faucettb; 06-17-2005 at 10:06 PM.
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  #7  
Old 06-18-2005, 08:27 AM
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LEts put it this way, if I were doing the work and had to buy the pad, would probably charge you the same price ($100). It isn't a hard job once set up for it and one well within the abilities of a handy non-professional (but lest face it, are some folks that should not be allowed to own power tools).

I'd pay the may if the gun is in good conditon other wise...but if the rifle is a bit beat up, might consider it a learning experience and go ahead and give it a try.
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  #8  
Old 06-18-2005, 09:10 AM
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I would still rather fit and install a rcoil pad than fit a curved steel butt plate. Especially the Marlin rifle butt plate from the 1890's.

Lee L.
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  #9  
Old 06-18-2005, 09:21 AM
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kdub,
Another old trick is if you have a rifle with too short a pull even after installing a pad, use 1/4" lexan plastic sheets cut to size and installed under the pad before grinding. (Sometimes when installing a new butpad on a gun with a curved butt plate it comes out too short after cutting off the curved section.)(Especially if changing the angle to a more comfortable one.)

Lee L.
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  #10  
Old 06-18-2005, 09:26 AM
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faucettb,
Next time put the tape on the stock before cutting to length, it reduces any chance of chipping the stock, which can happen even with a band saw.

Lee L.
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  #11  
Old 06-18-2005, 09:27 AM
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Looking it over and rethinking...$100 is on the high end of things. MORe like $75-$80 would be about right, unless you had a specific recoil pad in mind....then it might be $100 depending on how much trouble the pad you demanded was to fit.

Are soem "prefit" pads that are supose to be very close to the final dimentions...Brownell's list one for the 336. Haven't used one to tell you, but if you were to try this as your first sttempt, may be a good $36.98 to spend.

Would just stick it on with double sticky tape and take a hard look at the fit. If you don't grind on it or mark it up in anyway, if it doesn't fit close enough, can return it to Brownell's. .

Last edited by ribbonstone; 06-18-2005 at 09:42 AM.
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  #12  
Old 06-18-2005, 09:35 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ribbonstone
Looking it over and rethinking...$100m is on the high end of things. MORe like $75-$80 would be about right, unless you had a specific recoil pad in mind....then it might be $100 depending on how much trouble the pad you demanded was to fit.

Are soem "prefit" pads that are supose to be very close to the final dimentions...Brownell's list one for the 336. Haven't used one to tell you, but if you were to try this as your first sttempt, may be a good $36.98 to spend.

Would just stick it on with double sticky tape and take a hard look at the fit. If you don't grind on it or mark it up in anyway, if it doesn't fit close enough, can return it to Brownell's. .
You know, I think that $100,000.00 might be a little steep too. ($100,000.00 = $100m) Sorry, couldn't pass that one up.

Lee L.

Last edited by M1894; 06-18-2005 at 09:43 AM.
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  #13  
Old 06-18-2005, 09:49 AM
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OK...fixed the random "m"...but didn't bother to fix the other errors (that would make this too much like work).

Curved steel plates are a lot harder to work with...and if you don't have the original, getting one that fits the curve is a problem. Making one to match that curve is pure fustration, but once it's one, the process is pretty much the same for fitting it...just more grinder work than sanding.

Then there are those steel plates that have a "hump" underneath them...which is even more fustrating.

OK...this may be wroth a try:
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...712&hasJS=true

Are a bit cheaper...but again, what you'd prefer is one that's a fraction of an inch too large to one that's a fraction of an inch too small. With the large one, could slowly can carfully grind/sand it down to a perfect fit.

Last edited by ribbonstone; 06-18-2005 at 10:01 AM.
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  #14  
Old 06-18-2005, 10:00 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by M1894
faucettb,
Next time put the tape on the stock before cutting to length, it reduces any chance of chipping the stock, which can happen even with a band saw.

Lee L.
Yup, your absolutly right Lee, I should have included that you need to tape before cutting, and also be sure the cut is accurate and at a 90 degree angle to the line of the stock. As I get older I tend to forgit things. Ran a small gunshop for a lot of years and did a lot of "fixin" home grown pad installations. This seems to be one of the easy things to to a gun, but in reality is very hard unless you do have the right equipment and an eye for doing it. It's a lot like stock making and checkering, If you've been in the business for a while it's amazing what some folks will do to a nice gun trying to "improve" it just a little.

Can't tell you how many times I've heard "The sander just slipped a little, or I thought it looked straight til I got it outside in the sunlight. I've see stocks cut off at funny angles, pads installed just a little left or right of where they should be, toes cut off straight instead of following the line of the stock, to small of pads, etc., etc.

I know being a good business man it's impolite to laugh at a customer, but sometimes it was really really hard to keep a straight face. Like somone above said some folks should not try homegrown gunwork.

One of my favorite's was the gun in a box. Fella brought me one of the little Winchester 290 22 autos in about 50 pieces in a box. Said he took it apart to clean it and could never figure out how to put it back togather. Left it and never came back. My son is still shooting that little 22.
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  #15  
Old 06-18-2005, 10:37 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb
Yup, your absolutly right Lee, I should have included that you need to tape before cutting, and also be sure the cut is accurate and at a 90 degree angle to the line of the stock. As I get older I tend to forgit things. Ran a small gunshop for a lot of years and did a lot of "fixin" home grown pad installations. This seems to be one of the easy things to to a gun, but in reality is very hard unless you do have the right equipment and an eye for doing it. It's a lot like stock making and checkering, If you've been in the business for a while it's amazing what some folks will do to a nice gun trying to "improve" it just a little.

Can't tell you how many times I've heard "The sander just slipped a little, or I thought it looked straight til I got it outside in the sunlight. I've see stocks cut off at funny angles, pads installed just a little left or right of where they should be, toes cut off straight instead of following the line of the stock, to small of pads, etc., etc.

I know being a good business man it's impolite to laugh at a customer, but sometimes it was really really hard to keep a straight face. Like somone above said some folks should not try homegrown gunwork.

One of my favorite's was the gun in a box. Fella brought me one of the little Winchester 290 22 autos in about 50 pieces in a box. Said he took it apart to clean it and could never figure out how to put it back togather. Left it and never came back. My son is still shooting that little 22.
Yup, Still have a Model 60 Marlin and a Model 620 Stevens 16GA that was dumped on me for re assembly. Couldn't find either customer , and that's been over 20 years ago. Ended up re-blueing the Stevens and re-finishing the stock and fore end. Even found a new barrel and fore end assy for it with Cutts compensator and choke tubes.

I know about keeping a straight face with some customers, but some things they do are quite funny.

Lee L.
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  #16  
Old 06-18-2005, 11:09 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ribbonstone
OK...fixed the random "m"...but didn't bother to fix the other errors (that would make this too much like work).

Curved steel plates are a lot harder to work with...and if you don't have the original, getting one that fits the curve is a problem. Making one to match that curve is pure fustration, but once it's one, the process is pretty much the same for fitting it...just more grinder work than sanding.

Then there are those steel plates that have a "hump" underneath them...which is even more fustrating.

OK...this may be wroth a try:
http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...712&hasJS=true

Are a bit cheaper...but again, what you'd prefer is one that's a fraction of an inch too large to one that's a fraction of an inch too small. With the large one, could slowly can carfully grind/sand it down to a perfect fit.
Wasn't trying to be pickey, but the random "m" was funny. I knew what you saying, but just couldn't pass up the ribbing.

Like you I prefer the pad just a fraction too large over the one just a fraction too small. Also find it eaiser to remove the hump on metal butt plates than to releive the wood.

Lee L.
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Old 06-18-2005, 12:18 PM
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May as well admit this here. Came into possession fo a CZ "boy's rifle"...nice little gun, but about 1" too short for full sized humans. IT has a recoil pad on it now to make up that 1", but I've never fully fitted it...the intention being to just shoot it and see how the little critter does then put the stock flat plastic plate back on and let it go on it's way to someone of the right size to use it.

As it was seen as a "temp" I never really fittted the pad...it overhangs the stock by a good 1/8" on all sides...really uglies the thing up.

Problem is that little gun shoots very well...and I've got the urge for a light weight .22 sporter (again...thought a little Krico had cured that). SO...I'll e3ither fit that pad and use the ugly factroy stock or I'll spend the $ and restock the bugger in something even more light weight.


-----------

OOPs..a copuple of extra letters (and numbers) in that one as well...and you'd think that if I took the time to write this, I could have taken the time to fix them....but noe that I know that others kind of enjoy the errors, feel like I'd be cheating them of a chance at some fun.

Last edited by ribbonstone; 06-18-2005 at 12:21 PM.
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  #18  
Old 06-18-2005, 05:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ribbonstone
May as well admit this here. Came into possession fo a CZ "boy's rifle"...nice little gun, but about 1" too short for full sized humans. IT has a recoil pad on it now to make up that 1", but I've never fully fitted it...the intention being to just shoot it and see how the little critter does then put the stock flat plastic plate back on and let it go on it's way to someone of the right size to use it.

As it was seen as a "temp" I never really fittted the pad...it overhangs the stock by a good 1/8" on all sides...really uglies the thing up.

Problem is that little gun shoots very well...and I've got the urge for a light weight .22 sporter (again...thought a little Krico had cured that). SO...I'll e3ither fit that pad and use the ugly factroy stock or I'll spend the $ and restock the bugger in something even more light weight.


-----------

OOPs..a copuple of extra letters (and numbers) in that one as well...and you'd think that if I took the time to write this, I could have taken the time to fix them....but noe that I know that others kind of enjoy the errors, feel like I'd be cheating them of a chance at some fun.
Richards micro-fit makes stocks inletted for the CZ in about any style they sell. Their bottom line (nice regular wood) sells in the 60-80 dollar range. They have a dandy selection of styles. I kinda lilke the old classic style with the outline cheak piece, but there are some others that catch my eye. I'm gonna replace the Remington limp noodle fibre glass stock on my 700 muzzle loader this summer. This is there site http://rifle-stocks.com/
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  #19  
Old 06-18-2005, 06:40 PM
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Talking

Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb
Richards micro-fit makes stocks inletted for the CZ in about any style they sell. Their bottom line (nice regular wood) sells in the 60-80 dollar range. They have a dandy selection of styles. I kinda lilke the old classic style with the outline cheak piece, but there are some others that catch my eye. I'm gonna replace the Remington limp noodle fibre glass stock on my 700 muzzle loader this summer. This is there site http://rifle-stocks.com/
Nice looking stock, but it looks like the owner is backwards.

Lee L.
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Old 06-18-2005, 09:24 PM
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Originally Posted by M1894
Nice looking stock, but it looks like the owner is backwards.

Lee L.
Richards says they can make right handed stocks for left handed shooters, left handed stocks for right handed shooters, stocks for left handed shooters whom are right eye dominate and so on. Made me dizzy just writing this. I wondered if anyone would notice. This photo is right out of their web site. I'm going to put one of these on a Remington 700 muzzle loader. Hopefully they will send me a right handed stock for a right handed person.
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