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  #1  
Old 03-27-2007, 07:46 PM
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Forend Tips


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What do I need to know to install a forend tip on my JRS Laminate stock
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  #2  
Old 03-27-2007, 08:00 PM
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Hammer and a nail, 16 penny ought to do it, use a galvenized one for corrosion protection!

On the serious side, I'm not familiar with the stock you have, what kind of tip is it? I've done custom ones of wood, brass and poured pewter. A little more info would be helpful for us old farts who ain't up on all the new store-bought gadgets. If it's a square cut (or plastic), best option is to dowel it in place (not a bad thing to do with wood also)

BTW JB, how's the weather up there? I don't miss it at all! (used to live by the I-80/I-81 split)

If you want to send pic's, you can email me:
[email protected]
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Last edited by markkw; 03-27-2007 at 08:03 PM.
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  #3  
Old 03-27-2007, 08:14 PM
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Hi JB,

It's pretty simple. Easiest was is to drill some small holes in each piece that more or less line up, and epoxy some little dowels in there to help hold the pieces together. Naturally the end of the stock needs to be straight and square, and so does the cap.

I use clear hardware store epoxy (the regular '2-ton' stuff works fine) and make sure I get plenty in the space. Use clear; it'll turn out leaving a thin black line between the pieces when you are done.

Whittle it to shape and call it good!

What are you going to use?
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  #4  
Old 03-27-2007, 08:55 PM
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Like MikeG says most forend tips are simply glued on with a good epoxy. I use Brownell's Glassbed with no coloring mixed in and just clamp well. A good two part epoxy will make a joint stronger than the wood.

You can use Rosewood or any contrasting wood. Ebony makes a beautiful forend and you can even install spacers if you want. Personally I don't like any type of plastic as down the road a ways if you want to refinish most finish removers will dissolve plastic.

You don't see many laminated stocks with forend and grip caps installed. That should make a handsome stock done that way.
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  #5  
Old 03-28-2007, 05:38 AM
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The stock is a Laminate stock from Boyds with nothing on it at the moment. I have a chunk of ebony I got from Brownells that I am going to use for the cap. I have plenty of Acraglas, so I will use that and some kind of pins, anything wrong with steel? Good to see you back Bob!
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My sin, oh, the bliss of this glorious thought!
My sin, not in part but the whole,
Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more,
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul
!


Not because of who I am, but because of what HE's done, not because of what I've done, but because of who HE is. -Casting Crowns
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  #6  
Old 03-28-2007, 05:40 AM
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By the way Mark, we had about 10 inches of snow a week and a half ago, yesterday it was in the high 70's/ low 80's with a nice breeze
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My sin, oh, the bliss of this glorious thought!
My sin, not in part but the whole,
Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more,
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul
!


Not because of who I am, but because of what HE's done, not because of what I've done, but because of who HE is. -Casting Crowns
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  #7  
Old 03-28-2007, 06:33 AM
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JB,

Better you than me, we've been feeding off the garden all winter long! (sorry, but yes I do feel the need to rub it in a little) LOL

Are you going to square cut the stock and tip or fancy cut it? If you fancy cut it in, you really don't need to dowel it in. Problem with the square cut is, everything depends on the adhesive holding (and it looks cheap). If the tip takes a good hit, even with the epoxy dowels, it's not going to have the same strength you'll get from a metal or wood dowel pin installed. All of the torque is applied solely to the joint, a solid dowel will expand the weight bearing surface over the entire length of the dowel pin. Metal or wood will work, if you use wood, go with hickory, white ash or white oak. If you use metal, I suggest a non-ferrous like brass or stainless steel (chances are it'll never get enough moisture to allow corrosion but it can happen, corrosion on aluminum or steel pins can split the wood.

I also strongly suggest you avoid the hardware store epoxies too. These are not in the same class as the true industrial epoxies, I use Flex 5405, little more money but well worth it in the long run because it doesn't degrade from UV exposure or dry rot and weaken over time.
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  #8  
Old 03-28-2007, 07:54 AM
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I don't think it matters what kind of pins you use. Ideally, they need to be rough. In fact short pieces of all-thread might be perfect, or old bolts.

Good luck.
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  #9  
Old 03-28-2007, 08:14 AM
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Ebony makes a nice forend tip. Make sure the stock and ebony is absolutely square where they meet. You need a 5/16" hardwood dowel with glue grooves and two 1" or 1 1/4" long finish nails with the heads cut off. Drill a 5/16" hole in the stock and the tip to accept the dowel. The dowel should be slightly below the center of the stock. Drill two small holes to accept the nails. The nail holes should be slightly higher and to each side of the dowel holes. You need someway to apply pressure to the stock and tip so the glue in between is squeezed out leaving an invisible seam between the stock and the tip. I use to have a jig I made out of threaded rod and a couple of pieces of bar stock. You can also use a jack against the butt stock and the tip against a wall, bench top or block of wood fasten to the bench top. Make sure the dowel and nails line up between the tip and the stock. Cover the dowel with glue and drive it into the stock. Cover the nails with glue and put into the stock. Put a light coat of glue on the surface of the stock and the tip and put the tip onto the stock lining up the nails into their respective holes. Now apply pressure to the tip and stock while the glue sets up. This procedure will give you a very strong tip/stock connection. I usually cut an undersized barrel channel in the tip before I install it. After the glue joint has set you can finish the tip and barrel channel. This is the procedure I use on a new stock. You will have to deal with protecting your stock from the glue and when shaping the tip. If I was doing it I would refinish the stock so you can get a perfect forend tip matched to the contour of the stock. One other point, make sure the barrel does not touch the tip at any point. If you want forend pressure, make contact at the end of the stock, not on the tip.

Frank

Last edited by Frank Whiton; 03-28-2007 at 08:17 AM.
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  #10  
Old 03-28-2007, 02:21 PM
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I used a method very similar to Franks but instead of nails I liked #6x32 machine screws. Drill slightly undersized holes, coat with epoxy and set into tip block then snipped off the heads. I set block to stock with a leather mallet. Guess I just thought the threads would help hold, but the glue really does the work.
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  #11  
Old 03-30-2007, 05:08 PM
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I prefer a hardwood dowel, about 1/2" x 1 1/2" usually. It's plenty strong enough and much lighter than all-thread.

Ebony is one of the "oily" woods, it's somewhat harder to get any glue to hold as well as we would like. "Washing" the contacting surface with acetone after fitting helps.

Last edited by ranger335v; 03-30-2007 at 05:10 PM.
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  #12  
Old 03-30-2007, 07:29 PM
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Just got this article out of the newest brownells web bench http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/Gun...c_ev=emailopen
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My sin, oh, the bliss of this glorious thought!
My sin, not in part but the whole,
Is nailed to the cross, and I bear it no more,
Praise the Lord, praise the Lord, O my soul
!


Not because of who I am, but because of what HE's done, not because of what I've done, but because of who HE is. -Casting Crowns
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  #13  
Old 03-30-2007, 07:40 PM
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Haven't added a whole bunch of foreend tips, but was told the following:
1. Wooden dowel it in place...blind hole...preferably two small ones rather than one large one.
2. Wood seems to "hate" metal...wants to "reject" it by oxidation. Don't know if that's true or not, but have seen enough to make me belive there is something to it.
3. If bedding the rifle with +up+ pressure, the fore end tip should NOT supply any...the wood of the fore end does the pressure, the decorative tip shouldn't be pressure bearing.


Don't know how much of this is pure road apples or how much if factual, but I've been following that advice and it seems to be working.
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  #14  
Old 04-10-2007, 10:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ribbonstone
Haven't added a whole bunch of foreend tips, but was told the following:
2. Wood seems to "hate" metal...wants to "reject" it by oxidation. Don't know if that's true or not, but have seen enough to make me belive there is something to it.

Don't know how much of this is pure road apples or how much if factual, but I've been following that advice and it seems to be working.
Hi ribbonstone, interesting thoughts. The metal pins used to keep a forend tip from twisting are enclosed in glue and the wood would not have any direct contact with the metal. Butt Plates, Grip Caps and Sling Swivels have been held on for years with metal screws and I don't see the wood rejecting them. If the wood is green it could rust unprotected screws but that would be an exception.

Frank
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  #15  
Old 04-10-2007, 02:20 PM
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Like so much of gun-fiddling, it's past down with no real resoaning behind it...can't say it makes any difference, but I still do it the way I was taught to.
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