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  #21  
Old 09-14-2011, 02:55 PM
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As long as the break is free of any oil soaked wood I would use the wood glue.I've used Tite-Bond at work joining trim together,very strong stuff just try tearing it apart sometime.Elmers makes an interior/exterior grade that is stainable.That would be my first choice.
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  #22  
Old 09-14-2011, 09:05 PM
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I used the aliphatic resin. Claims to be water resistent. Looks good.
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  #23  
Old 09-15-2011, 09:23 AM
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I'm glad you got it done, Unclepaddy. This takes care of this thread, but for those looking to repair their stocks and still aren;t sure which is the best glue, there's this:

Virtually ANY glue will join wood and do the job. Some are better than others, hence the reason for this thread. You have yellow and white glues, polyurethane glues (Gorilla glue), epoxies, Accraglass (which I suspect is an epoxy resin [with fiber additives]), cyanoacrylates (super glues), and hide glues. ALL of those mentioned would repair a broken stock, yes...even the super glues.

Water resistance is nice but not necessary. For example, Titebond has been mentioned. It's a yellow aliphatic resin, the same as any other yellow glue on the market (Elmers, Franklin, etc). Fix your stock, let it cure, then stand it on-end soaking in the bathtub for three days. It's not coming apart. hehehe But.....how much water resistance do we need for a gun stock? If we drop our Remington pump in the lake for a week, and forgot to use a waterproof glue, and the stock breaks again, we've got bigger problems than stock repair. What we're talking here is resistance......water resistance.....not proofing. Got a little rain or snow on your favorite Ruger rifle? You used the correct glue for repair - a yellow glue.

Titebond II (and the newer Titebond III) have a much greater water resistance than regular aliphatic resin glue. Now, you would use that type of glue if you were building some teak (or oak, or cedar, or....) patio chairs that were expected to sit out in the weather throughout the seasons. And...while either glue will work on a rifle stock, it is wholly uneccessary. But if you knew, for example, that when hunting with one particular rifle, it was going to get rained and snowed on every time, and that dampness would sit on the rifle for hours on end until you got home and could wipe it dry.....then you would want a more resistant resin like Titebond 2 or 3. Most rifles wouldn;t fall into this category, no matter where you were hunting, but maybe a few might.

Epoxies will work fine for a wood repair, but again, they're uneccessary. Plus, they're less likely to last. How is that, when we know epxoy glues are truly super adhesives? Well, epoxy dries to a hard, brittle cure. Yes, they have incorporated in them some toughness - some elasticity, but at their core they're brittle. And waterproof...no water will penetrate them. But when we're gluing wood, we need the fibers to join in a cellular fashion. This is where the aliphatic resins shine, and this is why they're used in woodworking. As wood expands and contracts with changes in humidity, the woods fibers (inside the glued joint) must be able to act accordingly. Yellow and white glues (and animal hide glues - very good!) allow this to occur, while still keeping the fibers joined at the cellular level. Now, I didn;t write the book on this - I'm too much of a layman for that, I'm just repeating what I've learned and experienced. A guy can go and read and learn about different glues and their properties.

Why not use a heated, or even liquid, hide glue? They're good and strong, so why not? Well, heated hide glues are used so a joint can be taken apart later, if necessary. Yes, they're very strong, but they're not ideal for several reasons. We don't all have access to a glue pot or the animal glue. It takes too much time and effort to setup just for a simple repair. And we don;t ever want to take the joint apart. And liquid hide glues, while bottled for convenient use, don;t offer the same strength and benefit of yellow glue, though they are good for a quick, simple repair on other wood projects. Nope. Not for rifle stocks.

Anyway, the summary is: if a guy is making or fixing a wood rifle stock, any glue can be used. The most ideal glue for wood remains yellow or white glue. If the rifle is to be laid against the woodpile and remain there throughout the seasons , then a guy might want to use T-bond II or III. Personally, I would recommend a regular yellow glue, and to store the rifle indoors

Just a thought........
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Last edited by StretchNM; 09-15-2011 at 09:46 AM.
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  #24  
Old 09-15-2011, 11:35 AM
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Stretch, that's a good summary. Thanks a bunch.
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  #25  
Old 09-16-2011, 02:07 PM
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One thing about the water resistance of glue is that we put a finish over our wood stocks because we don't want water getting into the wood fiber, because wood fiber and water don't work out well in the longevity department. So why is it so important for the glue to be water-resistant when the very thing you are gluing isn't? Might be a long-shot issue if you didn't repair the finish over the glue joint, but that's about it.
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  #26  
Old 09-16-2011, 02:08 PM
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Many thanks for the input of all, and especially Stretch.
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  #27  
Old 09-16-2011, 06:05 PM
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Unclepaddy, I think the issue that was raised was concerning water solubility. Now, the glues we've spoken about are not necessarily water soluble in the context we're talking about, That is, water doesn't cause them to dissolve or release their bond unless immersed in it for considerable time. We don;t expect that in a rifle stock, and water on the surface of the wood surely isn;t going to affect the glue in the joint any more than the surrounding wood(bringing to point your mention of repairing the finish over the stock repair).

I can;t always help with rifles, because I haven;t half the experience of most in here, but wood and glues I have a little insight on, if nothing else. So if it helped you, you're welcome!
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