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  #1  
Old 12-22-2012, 02:23 PM
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.44 compressed load


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I'm kinda new to handloading. I have a .44 mag super redhawk. I got some nosler 300 grain hollow points and want to load them up just for shooting purposes. According to my reloading manual for that weight of bullet and the powder im using, H110, i should have 20.5 grains of powder, which puts me a 114% load densisty. What im want to try to find out if, will my revolver handle a load? Any input on the issue would great. Thanks
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Old 12-22-2012, 02:59 PM
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Whose manual? Not all 300gr. bullets are the same length or have the cannelure in the same place. I doubt you could compress H110 that much and I wouldn't try, anyway.
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Old 12-22-2012, 04:05 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lacern View Post
According to my reloading manual for that weight of bullet and the powder im using, H110, i should have 20.5 grains of powder, which puts me a 114% load densisty. What im want to try to find out if, will my revolver handle a load? Any input on the issue would great. Thanks
114% load density ?!?! I've been handloading for 40 years, and I've never heard of such a statistic. What/where did you get that? What does it mean?

My Speer #14 lists 20.2 to 22.5 grains of H110 with their #4463 300 grain bullet. It does not show it as a compressed load. It is a jacketed bullet.

It does say to crimp in the second groove. COAL 1.665"

Here it is at MidwayUSA

Speer Bullets 44 Cal (429 Diameter) 300 Grain Jacketed Soft Point Box

I should think the manufacturer of your bullet would provide a crimping canelure in the appropriate place.

So, all in all, I don't think you will have any trouble, but only you will be in position to see if there is a problem.

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Old 12-22-2012, 05:10 PM
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As Mike said above, make sure the manual you are using is specifying the Nosler bullet. For instance, some .429 bullets have the cannelure positioned for a .444 Marlin or may have two crimping grooves. So seating depth may be different for the bullet in your manual from the Nosler bullet. The seating depth can make a lot of difference in powder space available and therefore pressure. I have never used a 300 jacketed bullet in a .44 magnum, but have used cast bullets of that weight. I never really pushed it as i figured 1100 fps or so with a 300 grain bullet was plenty. So I have not had experience with compressing h110/296. But it doesn't sound like a good idea.
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Old 12-22-2012, 07:50 PM
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Ok thanks for the information. Im using a nosler reloading manual fifth edition. The manual lists both the H110 at 20.5 grains with the 300 hollow points as an exceptable load at 1423 fps. I backed my load down to 18.9 grains because i wasnt comfortable with what i had going on. I consulted my speer #13 manual and it mentioned the double crimp line, however the bullets i have only have one crimp line so im kinda stuck there. Also my COAL was way of target so iwas trying to get that under control as well. I got the load density information from my nosler book. Also my manual lists W296 as a compressed load with the same bullets.
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  #6  
Old 12-22-2012, 07:56 PM
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You can't compress ball powders very much, and I wouldn't try. If your particular lot gets to the base of the bullet before you hit the max data, then stop putting more powder in and go with that.

It should be easy to measure with the 'depth' function on a dial caliper.

If that doesn't make sense, just ask.
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  #7  
Old 12-23-2012, 11:32 AM
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Lacern,

I see that Nosler data lisying 118% case fill for 20.5 grains of H110, and 122% for 21 grains of 296 (same identical powder with different label; different lots can have different burn rates, which accounts for the charge difference they give). QuickLOAD thinks that would be only about 100.8% and 103.3% case fill with those two, respectively. I think they've calculated the case fill incorrectly, which explains how they could still get the bullets in. This is why it's worth checking several data sources to get an opinion on where to start.

Let's take a different approach by working with case fill:

First, check your seating depth.

Seating Depth = Case Length + Bullet Length - COL (Cartridge Overall Length)

Note that for comparison purposes, use the case trim-to length in the manual you are comparing to, and not your particular case's length. For .44 Magnum this would typically be:

Seating Depth = 1.275" + Bullet Length - COL

You must use the same seating depth as the load you are working from did. Otherwise your peak pressure will not be the same because you are asking the powder to start burning in a different size case.

Based on comparing various recommended minimum loads with this powder for 300 grain jacketed bullets seated to 1.600" COL, the pattern I see is the minimum load recommendations (except for Nosler) average about 90% case fill under the bullet to ensure a good burn.

How do you find that?

First, find your seating depth from the formula above. Second, set your caliper to that seating depth. Note the depth probe coming out of the back of the caliper beam for finding how deep blind holes are. Perch the back edge of that beam on the edge of the mouth of a primed case that is sitting upright on a flat surface, so the depth probe sticks down inside the case. Slowly add H110 until it is just level with the bottom of the probe. This is 100% case fill under the bullet.

Pour the powder out of the case and onto your scale to weigh it. Multiply that weight by 0.90. This is your new starting load.

The loads given by Hodgdon for the 300 grain Hornady XTP seated to 1.600" COL are between 18 and 19 grains. Your calculated result for a starting load should fall in that ballpark somewhere, assuming you are using the same COL. You can then work the load up from there toward 100% fill while watching for pressure signs (sticky extraction of fired cases in a revolver is usually a solid indication you need to back the load down 5%). QuickLOAD thinks that 100% fill will be about 20.3 grains with the Nosler bullet at 1.600 COL and produce right at the SAAMI pressure maximum. But do note that spherical propellant bulk densities can vary 10%, so that might miss by a bit. This is why you have to keep watching out for pressure signs.

You may find you have all the power you want before you get there. Alliant's new 300-MP may be a better choice for more velocity with a heavy bullet.
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  #8  
Old 12-23-2012, 02:38 PM
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Unclenick has given you some good info

My Nosler #5 states
300gn bullet
Winchester cases
WLP primers
OAL 1.61
H-110

19.5 grains 1380fps 111% LD
20.0 grains 1402fps 114% LD
20.5 grains 1423fps 116% LD

As Unclenick stated they may have a slight error in calculating the volume for the 44 case, thus giving a high % LD. The data is comparable with other data and bullets of very similar length and seating depth. So in short, don't get worked up by the LD percentage, as the data will be shot to a given PRESSURE.
To further ease you mind the Redhawk has one of the greatest safety margins with regards to strength.
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  #9  
Old 12-23-2012, 04:05 PM
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Thanks for the information guys. That is the kind of thing i was looking for. I had been reading some other post regarding the 44 magnum using H110. What i wasn't sure about wasif i was heading into no mans land. I've always used the loads that i found in my manuals and havent been reloading long enough to stray to far from that. So again thanks for the clarification on this issue.
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  #10  
Old 12-24-2012, 03:48 AM
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I have looked at that Nosler load a couple times, and wondered where the 118% came from myself. I have used similar charges under 300gr Hornady and Sierra bullets, seated the same depth, in Winchester cases, and they are by no means a 20% overfill. But I have not used new brass, and my SBH has a bit of extra room as chambers go, so once fired has some additional space..

One thing I have experienced is that H110/W296 turns in the best accuracy above 100% loading density. If I can feel/hear the powder when I seat the bullet, the load is generally a bit of a dog.
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  #11  
Old 12-25-2012, 05:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lacern View Post
I'm kinda new to handloading . . . What im want to try to find out if, will my revolver handle a load? Any input on the issue would great. Thanks
I've been reloading for almost 50 years and everything I've learned about reloading says continuous use of hot loads in a handgun accelerates wear and reduces the life of handgun brass. Not only that but you risk personal injury to your hand and arm with prolonged shooting. Unless you really need a hot load for hunting or SD, suggest you look into reduced loads when you just want to do some paper punching.

If you're working from a load found in a loading manual, you're Ruger can handle it providing you use the exact same load components. Personally, I would not load a compressed charge in any of my handguns. YMMV
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Old 12-25-2012, 05:19 AM
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Marshall Kane,

Please define "hot" load

Thanks
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  #13  
Old 12-25-2012, 05:51 AM
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Marshall Kane,

Please define "hot" load

Thanks
My definition of "hot" load is maximum or even beyond as some shooters just enjoy recoil. One of my shooting friends likes to shoot his super Blackhawk at max plus 10% which led to accelerated erosion of his barrel. No offense intended to these shooters but they should be aware that prolonged shooting with hot loads can lead to medical issues in time.
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  #14  
Old 12-26-2012, 10:00 AM
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Originally Posted by Marshal Kane View Post
One of my shooting friends likes to shoot his super Blackhawk at max plus 10% which led to accelerated erosion of his barrel.
Max + 10% is pretty bold, (or crazy), and with some powders, max pressures get notta extra when you pull the trigger. Max loads of Unique or W231 in the magnums, barely net the minimum levels for 2400, or W296/H110.

W296/H110 are great for hunting loads, and work really well just as you hit the upper end of the acceptable pressure range for a .357/.44M. Carbine or handgun. But just to go bang, not a chance. At least not in my guns.

One of the biggest advantages of handloading for the magnums (in my opinion) is the ability to produce suitable practice loads, without beating the gun/shooter too badly. There are few, if any, moderate factory loads for the magnums. The "Specials" are limp, and have dramatically different POI in my revolvers. But medium loads, using powders of "medium" burn rate, are often real close, especially with cast bullets. And you can shoot a lot of those with no fear of wear, or at least minimal wear.

When I put the crosshairs on game with my 77/44 or 77/357, I want a quick result as far as I can place the shot. I use 2400/W296, lots of it. But to practice, Unique.
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Old 12-26-2012, 04:11 PM
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Some Hornady 300 hp's I bought some years ago had two cannelures. If your cylinder will allow it, load long to reduce pressure. My Dan Wesson 44 allows me to load long but you'll have to check your Ruger.
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