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  #1  
Old 12-19-2005, 06:43 PM
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Kick from .40 vs .45 cal


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Hi all,

I have a Ruger P91 .40 cal that kicks hard. I like the gun, but the kick is so strong that I don't shoot the gun recreationally very much.

I've never fired a .45, but I was told recently that a .45 doesn't generally kick so hard. What's the relative "kick factor" between these two rounds? I'm considering swapping my .40 for a .45 if the enjoyability would go up during casual shooting...

dcs
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  #2  
Old 12-19-2005, 06:49 PM
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Think you just need to shoot a little bit more often to get use to it. .45 seems pretty close to the .40, but do think the .45 comes back a little stronger (assuming guns of equal weight).

MAy ant to try differnt .40cal ammo...if you wre to reload, could load it down a bit, getting reliable functioning and a bit less recoil.

But the .40 really isn't a hard kicker.
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  #3  
Old 12-19-2005, 07:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ribbonstone
Think you just need to shoot a little bit more often to get use to it. .45 seems pretty close to the .40, but do think the .45 comes back a little stronger (assuming guns of equal weight).

MAy ant to try differnt .40cal ammo...if you wre to reload, could load it down a bit, getting reliable functioning and a bit less recoil.

But the .40 really isn't a hard kicker.

Thanks for your input. To clarify a bit, what I feel is that my Ruger .40 really jumps when I shoot it. Maybe I shouldn't have called it "kicking". Most of the time, I shoot a K-frame S&W .38 and it's really a pleasure to shoot. I don't have as many problems anticipating the recoil (jerking the gun, jerking the trigger, etc.). I find myself wincing a bit on the .40. Just curious what a .45 might be like as a comparison...

dcs
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  #4  
Old 12-19-2005, 07:29 PM
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How firmly do you grasp the pistol when firing? A firm grip is a good thing with a auto pistol like you are shooting...has a bit more power than .38 so it will have more recoil also. The recoil on a auto pistol feels more straight back than a double action revolver, maybe that is the difference you are feeling.

Either way, Ribbonstone's advice is the best...practice, practice, practice. You might be able to find some lighter loads, but most .40 ammo I've seen is pretty snappy.
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  #5  
Old 12-19-2005, 07:35 PM
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Wife likes to shoot, and when she wanted to shoot the combat matches with me, we moved her from the .22 stright to the .45acp. Startd with my spare 1911, I just added a flat housing and a SHORT trigger so it would fit here hand. I did load some target ammo for her firs session. Her comment was: "it felt like the gun came apart, slid back and forth, then put itself together again."

Now that's a prtty accurate description of what a .45acp does (or any other semi-auto).. She took to it from the start...on the secnd range visit, she was shooting her own gun.

Points being:
Really plug up your ears...noise intensifies th experience.

Recoil is 90% mental (maybe 95%)...that amount of force to your hand is really minimal (much less than catching a baseball). It's FOCUS...if you are really focused on the front sight, and really consentrating, the recoil is much less acute....once you start consentrating on the recoil, are screwed for good shooting.

Gun has to fit your hand...and your hand has to grip the gun solidly. My standard grip is to grab it hard-hard until it shakes as I grip it, then back off the grip just enough to stop the shakes.

There is a reason the .22 is the starting gun of choice. ALL the good stuff is emphisised (sights, trigger cntrol, grip, accuracy) without any of the bad stuff (recoil, expense, noise).
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  #6  
Old 12-19-2005, 08:07 PM
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I've shot 45 competition for years and found one of the best things you can do is develop a good hard grip. Use a raquet ball or one of the spring exercisers and squeeze it a lot.

When your shooting get a really good grip on that handle. Some folks like a pair of thin shooting gloves.

Gun shoud not recoil in the hand, just twist a little. Thats how hard your grip on a semi-auto should be. There are several different loads for the 40 get the one with the lightest bullet, they will usually have the least recoil.

Good luck with your shooting.
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  #7  
Old 12-21-2005, 11:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb
I've shot 45 competition for years and found one of the best things you can do is develop a good hard grip. Use a raquet ball or one of the spring exercisers and squeeze it a lot.

When your shooting get a really good grip on that handle. Some folks like a pair of thin shooting gloves.

Gun shoud not recoil in the hand, just twist a little. Thats how hard your grip on a semi-auto should be. There are several different loads for the 40 get the one with the lightest bullet, they will usually have the least recoil.

Good luck with your shooting.
Excellent advise. I concur.
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  #8  
Old 12-21-2005, 01:00 PM
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I've fired some .40 and LOTS of .45, but never from identical pistols. My impression, though, FWIW is that the .40 in most loads has a "sharper" kick than the .45. Not necessarily any harder, just more abrupt, and this is reasonable as it's a higher-pressure cartridge. The old .45 punkin' roller kick is more of a shove to me, downright comfortable (and comforting) in my fullsize 1911, and certainly bearable in much smaller guns.
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  #9  
Old 12-21-2005, 06:41 PM
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I bought a P95 (9MM) for my first Auto. I didn't like it and bought a P97 (.45) and gave the 9MM to my Wife. After she shot my .45 she wanted one too. Gave the P95 to my Son. The Wife and I like the slower push of the recoil on the 45 instead of the sharper bounce of the 9MM. I you can, shoot someone's .45 and see if you like it better than the .40 and then you can decide if you need to trade or not.
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  #10  
Old 12-22-2005, 01:23 PM
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The .40 is a high pressure round. It will feel much different than a .38, a 9mm or even a .45. You are correct in stating that it feels like it wants to jump on you. With proper grip and some training, you get used to it and it isn't that bad at all.

A .45 will have a much different feel. It doesn't want to jump as much as it wants to push back into you.

You talk about anticipating recoil. I'd bet a dollar to a doughnut that you are jumping more because of the sound than the actual recoil. Most people are. Use plugs and then put muffs on over them. The more sound you block out, the better you will handle the percieved recoil.
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  #11  
Old 12-27-2005, 06:28 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dcsforum
Hi all,

I have a Ruger P91 .40 cal that kicks hard. I like the gun, but the kick is so strong that I don't shoot the gun recreationally very much.

I've never fired a .45, but I was told recently that a .45 doesn't generally kick so hard. What's the relative "kick factor" between these two rounds? I'm considering swapping my .40 for a .45 if the enjoyability would go up during casual shooting...

dcs
The responses to your question were right on the money.
This forum has some very good people.
I also love shooting the .45 acp and I'm not a big guy.
The .40 s&w is snappier like someone said.
Try the .45 you'll like it I guarantee.
I started with a S&W 625 revolver chambered in .45 with moon clips just to see if i could handle the .45
Great gun but only 6 rounds.
Then I bought my first 1911 and love it.
Once you go .45 you'll never go back.
Good luck with your choice.
Jon
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  #12  
Old 12-28-2005, 03:04 AM
BFL BFL is offline
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First I apologize for my bad English.

9mm and .40 rounds (bullets) are much lighter than .45s. Usually 9mms and .40s accelerate much faster than the .45s and they reach much higher velocities. Therefore, they kick sharper.
On the other hand, .45s are heavier and they do not accelerate as fast as 9mms and .40s. But they push back harder do to their heavier masses.

It is like hitting a wall with a fast bike (95 miles per hour) or with an 18 wheeler (25 miles per hour). One gives a higher frequency for a shorter period; the other one gives a lower frequency for a much longer period, because of the higher kinematic (heavier mass) energy (longer displacement in our case).

Last edited by BFL; 12-28-2005 at 03:07 AM.
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  #13  
Old 01-07-2006, 12:04 AM
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I think it's all a matter of slide speed. My wifw doesn't like to shoot my 9mm's or my 40's ,but she really likes to shoot my 1911's. The slower slide speed in conjunction with one of the most ergonomicly user friendly pistol designs ever made has much to do with it.

I've tried packing most of my handguns on a regular basis and have long ago decided on a S&W airweight .38, a little .32 NAA auto and one or another of my 1911's. Most of the time I carry a S&W 1911 Stainless fulsize. It's a little heavy, but man oh man, that thing is a first rate point shooter.
Dan
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