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  #1  
Old 06-29-2007, 08:23 AM
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Taurus 41 Mag Titanium Tracker


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Does anyone have a Taurus 41 mag "Tracker" revolver in total titanium with a 4" barrel? I'm thinking of tracking down this Tracker. It isn't made anymore, but I know there are some out there to be purchased.

I've got a few gun dealers working on it, so my reason for this post is to ask about the kick. Is it severe? I have very little experience shooting, but recently decided to buy a gun because I hike in bear country a lot, and sometimes I like to cook a steak after dark. Lots of cougar in Southwestern Washington up near Mt. Adams, as well. I need a light, low-maintenance gun that I can carry on my hip all day and not notice it too much. And since I rarely shoot, I will also need my one and only gun to be manageable for quite a bit of target practice. I'm 40 yrs old with no arthritis. A touch of carpel-tunnel in my wrist due to typing (I'm a writer). Any words of wisdom out there? Is this a decent firearm? Thank you in advance for any advice you might have.
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  #2  
Old 06-29-2007, 08:31 AM
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Welcome to the forum! Rules are to be polite and keep in mind that we are a family-oriented forum when selecting your content.

I don't own any of the titanium revolvers myself. A friend of mine bought a titanium shorty in .45 LC. He reports that a problem he has, even with his below-magnum level loads, is that he can't use bullets over 200 grains with it. Apparently the crimp hasn't been created that will keep anything heavier from backing out under recoil. Then he has a cylinder that won't revolve or open. That might conceivably be a problem with a lightweight .41 magnum, too. I would hate to have a gun lock up like that while I was trying to stop a charging bruin.

Expect noticeable recoil.
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  #3  
Old 06-29-2007, 10:42 AM
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I'll add to Nicks welcome. I have a stainless 41 mag tracker and prior to buying it I shot a friends Titanium Tracker.

My 34 ounce stainless model is has all the recoil I'd want. I've been a revolver hunter for about 40 years and regularly shoot 44 mags. I sure would suggest that you shoot one of these before you buy one.

The light titanium tracker was just plain viscous to shoot with full power loads. Even my stainless cannot be described as anywhere near pleasant to shoot with full power loads. I load it down for most uses.

Keep in mind that this is basically a K frame sized handgun and that even in 357 mag that sized handgun can deliver a pretty good whallop.

The best I can describe the recoil is it's very similar to shooting the new Smith & Wesson J frame ultra-light 357 magnum. After one cylinder I had all the shooting I wanted from that gun.

I haven't been shooting near as much as I used to, but I didn't have any problem putting 500 to a thousand rounds down my 44 magnums a month and these were factory equivalent loads.

If you must have absolutely the lightest gun to carry then the light Taurus meets that criteria, but everything has a price and the price of this super lightweight power is extreme recoil forces. Unless you load it down considerably your going to find target practice my be painful.
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  #4  
Old 06-29-2007, 11:21 AM
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ports

Thank you for the ideas. I assume that the 41 mags you shot both had ported barrels. Taurus seems to put ports on all their tracker models. I was hoping the ports would help to smooth out the kick on the 41 I'm thinking of buying. Recoil is definitely a consideration for me. I would really like to find a pistol that would be comfortable to take on hikes in terms of size and weight, and yet wouldn't be too brutal (recoil) to have fun target shooting with friends.

Kirk



My 34 ounce stainless model is has all the recoil I'd want. I've been a revolver hunter for about 40 years and regularly shoot 44 mags. I sure would suggest that you shoot one of these before you buy one.

The light titanium tracker was just plain viscous to shoot with full power loads. Even my stainless cannot be described as anywhere near pleasant to shoot with full power loads. I load it down for most uses.

Keep in mind that this is basically a K frame sized handgun and that even in 357 mag that sized handgun can deliver a pretty good whallop.

The best I can describe the recoil is it's very similar to shooting the new Smith & Wesson J frame ultra-light 357 magnum. After one cylinder I had all the shooting I wanted from that gun.

I haven't been shooting near as much as I used to, but I didn't have any problem putting 500 to a thousand rounds down my 44 magnums a month and these were factory equivalent loads.

If you must have absolutely the lightest gun to carry then the light Taurus meets that criteria, but everything has a price and the price of this super lightweight power is extreme recoil forces. Unless you load it down considerably your going to find target practice my be painful.[/QUOTE]
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  #5  
Old 06-29-2007, 11:44 AM
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I have one and don't find the recoil especially bothersome due to the porting. I got rid of those stupid "ribber" grips and got a good solid grip that I can hold onto...that helped greatly.

Accuracy is good. The cylinder is too short to chamber some of the real heavy loads sold for the 41 mag, but I pack 210 grain Hornady HP's and some 250 gr COrbon hardcasts.

I did have considerable QC problems with mine and had to send it back to the factory 4 times. The cylinder would rub on the forcing cone...so be sure and check that out before buying one.

I pack it in the woods and it's perfect for that use. In an emergency...like when the revolver and my arm gets stuck in a bear's mouth...I doubt the recoil will be noticed.

I know a guy around here that has one, too and may be interested in selling it. Let me know if you want me to ask him.
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  #6  
Old 06-29-2007, 12:30 PM
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Kirk,
Just a quick question...

No criticism intended whatsoever, but why did you decide on a .41 Magnum? It's not an entry level caliber. By your own words,"... my reason for this post is to ask about the kick. Is it severe? I have very little experience shooting..."
This tells me that you have not fired anything in this caliber before, nor witnessed anyone else doing it.
Look at my user name. I help people make choices on a first firearm purchase quite often. It is my business and my desire to make good matches of buyer and equipment.
And please don't take offense when I suggest that you are over-gunning yourself. The .41 is a stout performer that is on the same level as the .44 Magnum. Many people say that they cannot tell the two apart with similar loads.
In other words, not entry level.
I am not trying to change your mind. On the contrary I am trying to give you more info to make a choice that will better fit your circumstances.
Consider a .357 Magnum.
Small enough to carry on a belt, enough weight to tame recoil, fantastic terminal ballistics when load is matched to purpose. And there is the added benefit of being able to user lower power cartridges ( .38 Special) while developing your comfort zone with recoil. This way you can step up to higher recoiling .357 Magnum when you want, but still have an effective caliber in the .38. You can't do that with a .41 Magnum.
And I can tell you, as will others here, the .357 Magnum kills wild game of this size (bear and mtn. lion) like there's no tomorrow!
Others will correct me if I'm wrong, but a member here by the name of James Gates has written quite a bit about the effects of .357 Magnums and wild game. Do a search and some reading-interesting stuff.
Sorry to be so long-winded, it's what happens when you're home in bed with a virus and bored to tears!
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  #7  
Old 06-29-2007, 12:57 PM
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My stainless Tracker is ported and the porting does help. As Pawnbroker said there is very little difference between the recoil forces of the 44 mag and the 41 mag and I agree that the 38 special/357 mag is an excellent defense gun, especially if your on the lower end of the handgun shooting skills chart. Another good point made is that in a defense/emergency situation you probably will not notice the recoil.

On the other hand becoming proficient with any of the big boomers regardless of weight requires some practice. There are several ways to mitigate the recoil when becoming proficient with these high recoiling guns.

One of the best ways is simply to reload and load them down to the 750 to 900 fps velocity ranges with cast bullets. This will give you the ability to shoot much lighter recoiling less expensive ammo and greatly increase your shooting ability with that particular gun. It will also let you transition into full power loads with more confidence in your shooting ability.

If you haven't shot pistols or revolvers much before one of the best things you can do is get a simular size revolver in 22 long rifle and use it to learn basic shooting skills before going to a big bore revolver.

Shooting a handgun is an hand/eye coordination skill that takes a fair amount of practice to do well.

I've been shooting handguns for hunting and competition for near 45 years now and here's what I shoot most.

It's a four inch Rossi/Taurus six shot 22 long rifle revolver. It gets a brick of wally world 22 ammo shot thru it a month.



Here's the 34 ounce stainless Tracker. It's light enough to carry easily on a belt holster and heavy enough to plink with light handloads.



Here's the three guns I carry and shoot most. A Taurus ultra-light 38 special snubby for concieled carry, the little Rossi 22 and the Tracker 41 mag.

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Last edited by faucettb; 06-29-2007 at 01:00 PM.
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  #8  
Old 06-29-2007, 05:10 PM
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I haven't shot the .41 but I have two of the shorty .357s, one titanium, one stainless.

They are a real handful!

The ports will make recoil tolerable, at best. Not much will tame these guns. Of course it could always be worse....

Anyway - if a bear is chewing on your leg, recoil shouldn't be an issue. But you'll sure notice it otherwise.

They are a neat and handy carry gun - perhaps one of the very best combinations of design / materials on the market.

But they sure aren't fun to shoot.
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  #9  
Old 06-29-2007, 05:12 PM
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The 357 mag would be a good choice for sure. I carried a model 19 SW for years and it's not much heavier than the Taurus Tracker and it holds 6 shots.

I mentioned the porting on the Tracker. IMHO, Porting is really not desireable on a defense gun. It's loud and there's a chance you may have to shoot it inside a car or in a position where the muzzle blast from the ports is directed towards your face. Obviously not good. I would prefer the Tracker w/out ports, but I suppose quick follow up shots would be nigh on impossible w/out the ports.

Bob from Idaho mentioned loading it down for practice. That's what I do. SOmething else to consider...cleaning titanium is not easy. You can't use brass brushes on anything but the steel bore as the surface coating that Taurus puts on the titanium can be scratched off. That's a pain, if you're like me and can't stand a dirty gun or dirty chambers.
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  #10  
Old 06-29-2007, 05:27 PM
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The titanium finish will wear off soon enough, anyway. It doesn't hurt anything as it's cosmetic and the titanium doesn't need protecting from the elements.

Now that you mention it.... I don't recall ever cleaning mine. I know that sounds terrible but it can't rust and it's maybe had a couple of cylinders through it, max, the entire time I've owned it.

For practice I've got another .357 that's a whole bunch more fun to shoot.

Not sure how much quieter the 2" .357 would be without the ports, but I sure hate to imagine the recoil getting any worse. The stainless gun is a bit easier to manage. It might be tolerable without ports.

It's gonna be hideously loud, either way, in a 2" barrel.
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  #11  
Old 06-29-2007, 06:00 PM
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Yes, I am interested

I know a guy around here that has one, too and may be interested in selling it. Let me know if you want me to ask him.[/QUOTE]

Thank you, gentlemen, all of you, for your very keen observations today and help on my choice in a first handgun. I've never even owned a rifle of my own, so it's a big step for me. I had a girlfriend (ironically) who taught me how to shoot, and my dad had a .22 rifle when I was a kid that I shot a lot. Tammy had a .41 that nearly tore my arm off and I didn't like shooting it, but it was old and did not have ports.

If I could get by with a .357, I would much rather get that. Counter people at the local Sportsman's Warehouse here in Portland told me that a .357 wouldn't stop a bear that was more than a wee sprout (300 lbs). The grizzlies are slowly moving down through Washington and park rangers estimate they might show up in the next few years near Mount Adams where I go frequently. I have been camping and hiking up in the high alpine swamps of Adams for the past five years with no run-ins at all. Never saw even one bear, but I did come across bear and cougar poop quite a bit. They've got grey wolves there and a buddy and I got run up a tree by a pack of them. We never saw them, but they were growling and barking in the brush on both sides of the trail.

Basically, I would love to get by with a .357 so I could use .38 caliber bullets for target practice and save $$$. Plus,the kick should be a little less drastic. Do you guys really think .357's are enough gun to stop a fairly large bear? If so, I will jump on buying the smaller gun.

I am interested in that .41 titanium that you said your buddy might be willing to sell. Right now, I'm kind of on the fence about whether to get a .357 or the .41 that the guys at the sporting goods store recommended. I have come across a dealer with a .41 mag Taurus tracker, but it has a six inch barrel. Is that too long do you think for hiking with it on my belt? I've never packed a gun before, so I just don't know. I'm going to drive over to the Gun Room on Powell Bld. here in Portland to see the six inch barreled revolvers to get a sense of the size of them.

Thank you again for all of your help, gentlemen. I don't have any friends that shoot and I value your opinions very highly.

Kirk
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  #12  
Old 06-29-2007, 06:42 PM
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I spent several years in Alaska and carried a six inch 44 mag Smith & Wesson Revolver in a shoulder holster. I've had to use it once to protect a friend whom had been attacked by a Grizzly bear. It worked, but, from six feet away I durned near wet my pants. One of our moderators faced down and killed a Grizzly in Alaska with a 44 magnum revolver and dropped it just feet from him and his partner dressing out a moose so a big bore revolver will work.

I've killed 19 black bear with the 44 and 41 magnum revolvers and can't tell a bit of difference between the two for killing power on black bear.

On my part I carry the four inch 41 mag here in Idaho where there is a chance of running into a Grizzly when fishing on the Montana Idaho border. I carry it either in a belt holster or an uncle mikes shoulder holster. It would be my last choice if I was able to find any other way out of an encounter.

I find the shoulder holster much more comfortable than a belt holster with almost any handgun. It keeps it out of the way and spreads the load on your shoulders.

The real danger in being in the woods is getting between a bear and it's cubs or a bear and a kill. This situation can make a bear very aggressive. On the other hand most bear human encounters can be avoided if you pay attention to what's going on around you and become aware of bear behavior. There are several good books and videos on the subject.

As far as which revolver to carry, in your situation I'd get a Ruger 5.5 inch Redhawk in 44 magnum or one of the large frame (N frame) Smith and Wessons in a four or six inch barrel in 44 magnum and learn to shoot it. I'd carry it in a good shoulder holster.

For practice I'd shoot 44 special loads and transition to a heavy 44 magnum for woods carry. The reason for this is the heavier gun is much easier to shoot and more important much easier to learn to shoot than a light pistol in magnum chambering's. With a good shoulder holster the weight won't be a problem and if you ever need it you have a revolver that you can shoot with some sense of being accurate enough to really protect yourself with.

I have no problem with my 34 ounce 41 magnum, but I've been shooting magnum revolvers both for hunting and metal target competition for many years. The titanium 24 ounce 41's are simply to light for a novice shooter. To put one of these super lightweight magnums in the hands of someone whom doesn't have a solid grounding in shooting these high recoiling guns is simply put silly. You'd be way better off to carry a short barreled pump shotgun loaded with slugs.

Keep in mine no amount of protection will do you any good if your not proficient enough and cool headed enough to be effective with it.
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  #13  
Old 06-29-2007, 08:46 PM
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kirk,
I understand what you're trying to figure out, but you're running yourself around in circles. The only way you're going to be able to decide which one to buy is try them and see what you can handle.
Some of what is being related to you is fact, some is opinion or preference. The .357 Magnum kills quite well- fact. The .357 is enough to handle what you will face now- fact. The .357 is just maybe barely enough to kill a wee little bear of 300#- pure B.S. ( When S&W were in pre-release of the .357 Mag back in the 1930's, Colonel Doug Wesson took one on safari to Africa and killed all manner of animals that were larger than what the round was designed to do- nobody told him you could only kill small animals with it.) The .41 does everything better than the .357- fact . faucettb's statement that you're better off getting a .44 Magnum and getting used to it- fact. And opinion. And the idea of a short shotgun with slugs has merits that could fill another thread!
There are too many variables in what you want to help you pin down what you need.

So I am going to make you an offer...

Meet me for a shooting session. I will provide handguns in the calibers discussed, except .44 Magnum- you don't need to start there. This will give you a first-hand opportunity to test drive a short .357/ .38 revolver and a .41 Magnum (the one I will bring is a current production Ruger Blackhawk with a 4 5/8" barrel. This is the most common barrel length requested from dealers for woods defense).
You live in the Portland area, I will be back to my house near Lincoln City around July 8/9. Let's find somewhere midway to meet. Or if you want to come all the way to the coast, I'll treat you to some great clam chowder at a local diner after we shoot!
I've never made an offer like this before, but I've done hands-on demo's from shop inventory before. I will provide firearms and ammo, you bring your own Gatorade or Pepsi- no alcohol allowed.

One more thing...
My store is not in Oregon so I will not sell you any firearms. I hold an FFL which is very dear to me, and I follow the rules of that license to a "T" and then some( which means that I do not sell my guns privately-ever).
Whew-legal stuff over!

Let me know if you're interested.
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  #14  
Old 06-29-2007, 08:49 PM
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Just now reading this thread and I have to 2nd that last post and the recommendation of the .44 mag. and using the .44 special loads to target practice with it... You're starting out with a little bigger gun that will make a little bigger hole even if the bullet would decide not to expand. And the heavier gun would have less felt recoil.
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  #15  
Old 06-29-2007, 09:29 PM
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Pawnbroker made you a great offer. That's the way to see what you like and don't like.

You can also rent handguns at "A Place to SHoot" range in Delta Park. THey won't have a 41 mag, but they willl have 357 mag revolvers..and maybe a 44 mag. You can buy their ammo and you don't have to worry about cleaning the gun when you're done.

Personally, I think you'd do fine w/ a 357 mag. Check out the Taurus tracker 7 shot! Carrying that in a 4" barrel is plenty of firepower for two legged varmits, cougar and black bear. ANd you're far more likely to have need for it dealing with the two legged types than with a cougar. You'll never see a cougar unless you spend a lot of time in the woods. Maybe see a black bear once in awhile, but they usually like to keep their distance. Taurus and SW also make great 5 shot 357's, to keep the weight down.

As for griz down near Mt Adams...gotta say I'm way dubious. I could be wrong, but I try to stay up on this stuff in my area. There's griz in the Idaho panhandle and NE Wash, but I have not heard of any in the cascades. I'm welcome to being educated on that point, however.

ANother downside to the Titanium...it's very expensive. What Mike G said about the finish coating may be true enough, but I was told by Taurus that removing it would void the warranty.

I bought my Titanium tracker when it first came out, because I'm a gun nut and wanted something really light for packing around. WHen I bought it, S&W and Taurus had not brought out their 44 mag light weights. I settled for the 41 mag. If I had it to do over, I would either buy a lightweight 44 mag or learn to be content w/ one of my heavier 357 or 44 mag revolvers. I won't part with it now as I'm set up for reloading, but it's really a one purpose gun for me.

GOod luck and have fun shopping.

Last edited by leverite; 06-29-2007 at 09:36 PM.
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  #16  
Old 07-01-2007, 04:27 AM
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Interested in meeting

Quote:
Originally Posted by the pawnbroker

"Let me know if you're interested."
That's a generous offer. I'd like to get together and shoot some revolvers. My email is



Thanks,
Kirk





{NOTE: I stuck my nose in and edited this because, even though the board allows you to publicly post an email address, the spambots harvest them and put them on spam e-mail lists. It's not a good idea to put them up directly. The image version I put up is unrecognizable to OCR software at this point in time, and is the only safe way to do it. You can see my sticky on security precautions in the Trading Post forum.

Also removed the duplicate response.

Nick}

Last edited by unclenick; 07-01-2007 at 07:44 AM. Reason: Spambot resistance
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  #17  
Old 07-01-2007, 05:27 AM
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Ruger has a new 4" Redhawk in .44 mag that I think would be perfect for your use. Smith has also has a couple of nice 4" and 6" models as well. I second the suggestion about using the .44 mag and using the .44 specials for practice. Others with much more experience than I can give you great advice, but I don't like going out with anything less than my .44. A .41 would be the minimum as far as I am concerned and I would carry it, I just don't own one. For the record, the bears in my location are black bears but we have a lot of them, and I have not been in grizzly country. I think what Bob said about when bears get aggressive is really something to think about. Getting between a black bear and her cubs is a bad situation. This can happen easily if you don't pay attention to your surroundings. The question for you then becomes would a .357 kill a bear and do you want to trust your life to it when a very large, agitated grizzly or even a black bear comes right at you? Here is a link for the Ruger.

http://www.ruger.com/redhawk44/index.html

Last edited by RifleFan; 07-01-2007 at 05:30 AM.
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  #18  
Old 07-01-2007, 11:28 AM
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Send Pawnbroker a PM. The button is at the bottom of one of his posts.
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  #19  
Old 07-02-2007, 08:13 AM
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kirk,

I am glad to hear of your interest in my offer. It's possible that we will have more than just revolvers to shoot- I have been a 10mm fanatic since the Dornaus & Dixon days!
Send me a Private Message here with a phone # and I'll call you. I don't use my personal email on the boards- I'm sure you understand.
BTW-
You talk about access to Portland gunshops. Where do you live? In the Portland area, more or less, you also have

* Keith's Sporting Goods
1595 E. Powell Blvd.,Gresham

* Northwest Armory
12632 McLoughlin Blvd., Portland
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  #20  
Old 07-03-2007, 10:01 AM
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kirk,


Let's get in touch so we can go shooting.

Send me a Private Message here with a phone # and I'll call you. I don't use my personal email on the boards- I'm sure you understand. Please be sure to include your phone # so I can talk to you person to person for setting this up.
You know the deal- written directions take so long to arrive, and leave so much to be desired for exact communication.

Thanks...

the pawnbroker
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