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  #1  
Old 04-15-2006, 08:28 PM
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Reloading Beginner Kit?


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Well I have spent about 50 bucks so far on ammunition using factory stuff. So, I did some google searches on Reloading to see what the big deal is since most of the people at the ODNR Shooting Range reload. Well I am now looking to get a beginner kit for reloading in about a month or two since I want to wait for some paychecks to come in and get more money in bank account.

Right now I have noticed two nice kits are the Lock-N-Load by Hornady and then the RCBS Kits.

I am only going to be reloading .223 Rem for my CZ527 Kevlar Varmint rifle.

I am willing to pay for good quality but I am not wanting to get the best and sweetest set of equipment. I am trying to find the Honda Civic of Reloading equipment if that makes it easier to understand.

Anyone care to lend me some advice?

Thanks in advance
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  #2  
Old 04-15-2006, 10:46 PM
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I have a Redding Boss press and used to have the RCBS Rockchucker. I like them both. The Rockchucker kits are a little high. Here is a Redding press with .223 dies and the shell holder.

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=887006


You will still need a set of scales and a powder measure. I would try to stay with a cast iron press. Many on here use the Lees that are alloy and swear by them, but a steel press is more solid and is not going anywhere.
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  #3  
Old 04-15-2006, 10:50 PM
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Also, when I fire a .223 Rem Cartridge what caliber is the actual bullet? .223, .222, or .224 That is what I am confused about I want to try and get a list of everything I am going to need and don't know what to do.

Anyone know a good book I could prolly find at the library?
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  #4  
Old 04-15-2006, 10:54 PM
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.224 is your bullet diameter. Any good reloading manual will have everything you need inside. Get yourself a Lyman or Sierra manual and they walk you through step by step all of the processes for prepping cases and reloading.
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  #5  
Old 04-15-2006, 10:56 PM
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So you need a .224 for a .223 Caliber Cartridge?
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  #6  
Old 04-15-2006, 10:59 PM
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I see the Lock-n-Load kit is about $279. You can get this Rockchucker master kit that has everything you need for about $249.

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=646599
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  #7  
Old 04-15-2006, 11:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cybane
So you need a .224 for a .223 Caliber Cartridge?
You will be buying .224 bullets yes. The only ones that are .223 are for a .22 Hornet. All other .22 caliber bullets are .224.
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  #8  
Old 04-15-2006, 11:03 PM
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For well under a hundred bucks you can get a Lee anniversery kit from Midway. This will have everything except a set of dies.

I've been using Lee's stuff for a lot of years now and can only say all my green stuff is mostly gone. I reload for the following:

8mm Rem mag
7mm Rem mag
280 Remington
308 Remington
243 Remington
44 Mag
41 Mag
45 Long Colt
45 ACP
357 Mag
38 Special
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  #9  
Old 04-15-2006, 11:27 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cybane
Also, when I fire a .223 Rem Cartridge what caliber is the actual bullet? .223, .222, or .224 That is what I am confused about I want to try and get a list of everything I am going to need and don't know what to do.

Anyone know a good book I could prolly find at the library?
May I suggest the ABC of reloading And several good reloading manuals ie Speer ,lyman & feel free to pick the brains of the members of this forum .There is no such thing as a stupid question !Only stupid answers & you won't get any of those round here ! Everyone of us started some where at the begining of reloading
I wish when I started many years ago that there had been places like this that I could ask questions. The great thing about a reloading manual is that not only does it list min max loads for many different types of Powders for different bullet wieghts it gves the correct dia bullet to be used in that cartridge (which can be confuseing to say the least to the tryo)

Dave
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  #10  
Old 04-16-2006, 01:56 AM
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I never could get consistent loads with Lee. Seemed to ruin a lot of cases when resizing, also.

Redding and Hornady are good, but my vote goes for RCBS. We have the Rock Chucker and AmmoMaster. I use the Rock Chucker for resizing and when I weigh charges using a powder scale for extreme consistency. Also, for traveling.

RCBS's lifetime warranty is nice, too.

Hope this helps,
Jim
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  #11  
Old 04-16-2006, 10:12 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Southpaw
Redding and Hornady are good, but my vote goes for RCBS. We have the Rock Chucker and AmmoMaster. . . RCBS's lifetime warranty is nice, too.
It's true, RCBS's lifetime warranty is the best in the business. Have occasionally called them and their willingness to help is unbelieveable. Seems the only time they get businesslike is when they ask for your address so they can send you a free part. Believe your grandchildren will be still using the RCBS equipment that you buy today. This is not a putdown on the other makers, this is speaking from experience.

Last edited by Marshal Kane; 04-16-2006 at 03:20 PM.
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  #12  
Old 04-17-2006, 06:28 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cybane
So you need a .224 for a .223 Caliber Cartridge?
This is one of those things that can be a little confusing to a beginner and is another good reason to get a quality reloading manual. I have newer versions of Speer, Hornady, and Hodgdon manuals. They're all good and it helps greatly during load development to bat one against the other for min/max load data and to check for consistency. Hornady is usually more aggressive than the others in terms of max load. Lots of different "22 caliber" cartridges all use the same bullet diameter (0.224") but go by different names so as to retain manufacturers identity in industry. For example;

22 Hornet (not the real old ones)
218 Bee
221 Remington Fireball
222 Remington
223 Remington
224
22 PPC
22-250
220 Swift
and many others all use the exact same diameter bullet, 0.224", in a variety of different bullet weights, but the cartridge is given a unique name for brand recognition and cartridge case differentiation. The 223 will have a useable bullet weight range from about 40 grains to about 65 grains depending on the barrel twist rate. Faster twist rates are needed to stabilize longer, heavier, bullets in a particular caliber. I don't have a 22 caliber centerfire, others who do will be able to comment on the extreme light and heavy weight bullets suitable for use for your gun.

You can also find a ton on information on the internet. Another good site for general information is www.6mBR.com. Read some of their archive files. This is the best site for handloading, bar none.
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Last edited by flashhole; 04-17-2006 at 06:31 AM.
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  #13  
Old 04-17-2006, 06:33 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flashhole
This is one of those things that can be a little confusing to a beginner and is another good reason to get a quality reloading manual. I have newer versions of Speer, Hornady, and Hodgdon manuals. They're all good and it helps greatly during load development to bat one against the other for min/max load data and to check for consistency. Hornady is usually more aggressive than the others in terms of max load. Lots of different "22 caliber" cartridges all use the same bullet diameter (0.224") but go by different names so as to retain manufacturers identity in industry. For example;

22 Hornet (not the real old ones)
218 Bee
221 Remington Fireball
222 Remington
223 Remington
224
22 PPC
22-250
220 Swift
and many others all use the exact same diameter bullet, 0.224", in a variety of different bullet weights, but the cartridge is given a unique name for brand recognition. The 223 will have a useable bullet weight range from about 40 grains to about 65 grains depending on the barrel twist rate. Faster twist rates are needed to stabilize longer, heavier, bullets in a particular caliber. I don't have a 22 caliber centerfire, others who do will be able to comment on the extreme light and heavy weight bullets suitable for use for your gun.

You can also find a ton on information on the internet. Another good site for general information is www.6mBR.com. Read some of their archive files. This is the best site for handloading, bar none.
My Sierra Manual shows the Hornet as the only .223 bullet listed. It also shows a .224 in hornet. Don't know why, but all he needs to know is that his .223 is a .224 bullet.
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  #14  
Old 04-17-2006, 07:09 AM
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Pre-WW II .22 Hornets used the .223" bullet. The manufacturers shifted to .224" bullets after the war.

I started out with an RCBS Jr. press in 1968. It's still going and I certainly can recommend RCBS equipment.

Bye
Jack

Last edited by Jack Monteith; 04-17-2006 at 07:12 AM.
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  #15  
Old 04-17-2006, 08:46 AM
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I gotta go with faucettb on the Lee stuff. With operator error aside you can get some high quality reloads gaurenteed. Every session at the reloading bench should be a learning experience. I always seem to pick up something. Be it from trying a "new" technique or something I read in a manual or something I stumbled across on my own.

On the operator error thing if I DON'T ruin at least one piece of brass in the reloading of at least 2-300 rounds of various calibers, I would wonder about it. Unless you are reloading for something very exotic like a 600 Nitro express, a piece of ruined brass goes in the "I learned something today" pile.

Hey Gismo, I thought THIS SITE was the best site for reloading info bar none
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  #16  
Old 04-17-2006, 08:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jack Monteith
I started out with an RCBS Jr. press in 1968. It's still going and I certainly can recommend RCBS equipment. Bye Jack
Purchased a new RCBS Reloader Special, (exactly like the RCBS Jr.) in 1971 which went to my son when I bought the Rockchucker in the 90's. It is still being used by my son without any noticeable play in either the ram or the linkage. Still feels nice and tight and very smooth. Believe my grandsons will still be using that press when my son gets the Rockchucker someday.
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  #17  
Old 04-17-2006, 02:55 PM
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I started out with a Lee Anniversary kit about two years ago (I think it cost about $65), and I still use some of the stuff today. It all worked okay, but there are so many gadgets and things that make your job a little bit quicker or easier out there (ie digital scales, EJS primer reamers/cleaners, etc).

If you foresee yourself reloading a lot of rounds for the 223, go with whatever press, scale, calipers, funnels, sizing dies etc. you want, but don't skimp when it comes to the seating die. Nearly all of my dies are Lee, except for some Lyman expander M-dies and an RCBS competition seating die in 223 Rem.

Reloading requires patience, and I enjoy reloading. However, I was about ready to toss a couple hundred bullets or the Lee seating die when it came time to seat some flat-base bullets in their cases. The bullets would fall off when not perfectly balanced on the case-mouth (sometimes spilling some powder in the process), and I kept getting slightly varying ogive lengths. I finally asked the old-timer at the gun club what he used (an RCBS competition seating die). Despite the high price (about what I paid for my anniversary reloading kit), it was worth every penny.

Anyway, welcome to your new hobby/addiction.

amndouglas
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  #18  
Old 04-17-2006, 05:04 PM
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I just received my second RCBS competition seating die, this time in a 243 cal. I bought my first one a few years ago when I to had problems seating 223 bullets. I was having problems with light bullets in the 243, crunching the hp tip, and like. I ordered one from Sheels for less than $60. This is a great tool.
Jim
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  #19  
Old 04-18-2006, 04:58 AM
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The Forster Ultraseat die is top notch too. I have one for my 25-06 and 7mm Rem Mag and will eventually pick up one for my 243 as well.
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