» Advanced

Go Back   Shooters Forum > Handloading > Handloading Equipment
Register FAQ Members List Donate Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 03-30-2008, 12:19 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Northern Idaho
Posts: 174
Burn rate/strengh chart for Large & Small pistol primers???


Registered Users do not see the above ad.


Try as I might I can't seem to come up with the above. Found a nice chart for Large & Small rifle primers. I think that was on Rocky's website. No luck at all with anything on pistol primers. If anyone knows of such a reference I would really appreciate your help. Thx in advance for anything you can share...
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 03-30-2008, 12:36 PM
faucettb's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Peck, Idaho
Posts: 12,620
I don't know of a chart for pistol primers. I've been using CCI's for quite a while now and over almost 50 years of reloading have used about every one on the market. Can't say that I can see much difference in any of them as far as ignition goes for most calibers. Perhaps with some of the new extremely high pressure loads it might make some difference.
__________________
Bob from Idaho
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 03-30-2008, 01:09 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Hershey PA
Posts: 848
I do not know of a chart either. I can give you some opinions supported by observation and gut feelings though (yeah, you should be very afraid right about now!).

1. The Standard WW large pistol primer is a lot like the Federal large pistol mag primer in it's ability to light slow burning ball powders like H-110. In fact the WW box says their primers are for standard or mag loads.

2. The standard CCI small pistol primer is a lot like the standard Federal small pistol primer.

3. The entire line of Federal pistol primers (and maybe rifle??) is softer than all or most other brands of primers. On a high pressure load, you'll see more primer flow on a Federal than any other brand I had used.

If I can find them, I use nothing but Federal pistol primers. In rifles I only willingly use WW primers. Lot's of good stuff out there but this is where I have settled.
__________________
Against the wind...

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 03-30-2008, 01:12 PM
Jack Monteith's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Saskatchewan
Posts: 7,788
I haven't found much difference in small pistol standard primers, but CCI and Remington small pistol magnum primers are a step up and Winchester small pistol magnum primers are two steps up. The Winchester magnums are great with W296 and I assume H110, but I found that things get spooky fast with 2400 and faster powders.

Bye
Jack
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 04-02-2008, 12:50 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: DFW TEXAS
Posts: 17
Notes: Ratings were established by experience and inference from velocity/apparent pressure results and are not scientific. Do not use these charts for load development. Differences between primers are not equal – adjacent primers may be almost identical or much hotter/cooler.

Large Rifle Primers

Fed 215
WLRM
CCI 250
Rem 9 M
WLR
F210
CCI BR2
CCI 200
Rem 9

Small Rifle Primers

Fed 205
Rem 7
WSRM
Fed 200
WSR
CCI BR4
CCI 400
Rem 6 1/2

Rocky Raab

HANDLOADS .COM
__________________
Member of Lone Star Paralyzed Veterans
[U]http://www.lspva.com[/U]
USS LEXINGTON CVT-16 VNE V-2 CATS ABE2
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 04-02-2008, 12:52 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: DFW TEXAS
Posts: 17
Manufacturer Cup Thickness Diameter Height
Small Rifle
CCI 400 .020" .1753" .109"
450 .025" .1750" .113"
BR4 .025" .1755" .109"
Federal 200 .019" .1757" .111"
205M .0225" .1744" .1075"
Remington 6 1/2 .020" .1753" .109"
7 1/2 .025" .1752" .110"
Winchester SR .021" .1750" .109"

Large Rifle
CCI 200 .027" .2112" .118"
250 .027" .2113" .118"
Federal 210 .027" .2120" .117"
215 -- -- --
Remington 9 1/2 .027" .2100" .119"
Winchester LR .027" .2114" .121"
Mag .027" .2114" .121"
__________________
Member of Lone Star Paralyzed Veterans
[U]http://www.lspva.com[/U]
USS LEXINGTON CVT-16 VNE V-2 CATS ABE2
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 04-02-2008, 12:55 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: DFW TEXAS
Posts: 17
Sorry-I see now you are looking for pistol info. Can't help you with pistol.
__________________
Member of Lone Star Paralyzed Veterans
[U]http://www.lspva.com[/U]
USS LEXINGTON CVT-16 VNE V-2 CATS ABE2
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 04-13-2008, 09:00 PM
mattsbox99's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Havre, Montana
Posts: 6,283
Priming mix can vary from primer to primer and often from lot to lot.
__________________
Buy American, it may be your own job you are saving.
UTU, TY&E Service, BNSF
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 04-14-2008, 04:30 AM
hailstone's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,405
Never heard or seen a chart your referring too. Some years ago several different individuals conducted tests to determine which primers had the most brisnase (spelling?). They set up test fixtures to set off primers in a darkened enviroment with a graph type background and then photographed the resultant flash. By counting the squares in the lite up graph gave a rough idea as to each primers brisnase. This was done for all makes of primers if memory serves. This information was used to load ammo to verify the tests. The tests demonstrated that the most brisnase is not necessary the most desirable feature for accuracy. In fact one of the least brisnase primers had the best accuracy leading to the conslusion that consistant, uniform and complete ignition were more important than brisnase.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 04-14-2008, 06:48 AM
Rocky Raab's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Utah
Posts: 3,321
Thanks for the mention, guys.

I have no intention of repeating that test for pistol primers. For one thing, I have yet to note any significant performance difference among standard pistol primers (magnums are a different story, as told above). Second, these days I haven't the patience to try to find all the different kinds.

In general, Winchester primers are the hottest, with their magnum style up in the WHOOOEEEE! level. I'd reserve those for the hardest lighting, high-volume charges of ball powder. Flake powders and/or any cartridge not the size of a beer keg will perform just fine using any standard pistol primer you can get.

Finally, and despite the chances of igniting a firestorm of flames (intentional pun), I have to say that that test of primers using photos of the flame pattern is interesting, but it bears no relationship to brisance. Brisance simply cannot be measured that way. I'm not even convinced that one can say "more flame means a hotter primer." Nor does a bigger flame mean that you'd get more pressure or velocity from that primer when fired in an actual cartridge because there are too many other factors influencing the outcome. Interesting results, yes. Meaningful results? No.
__________________
To see my books and articles, just Google my name.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 04-14-2008, 10:08 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: NW Washington state
Posts: 294
Perhaps a more accurate test would be to use the Speer plastic training cases and bullets, the ones that just use a primer for power.

If someone were to fire a bunch of rounds with each primer, and record the velocities, this might give a good indication of which primers have more power.

I also agree though that with standard pistol primers, brand doesn't seem to make any difference in any loads I've worked with.
__________________
"America wasn't founded so that we could all be better. America was founded so we could all be anything we d**n well please."
-- P.J. O'Rourke
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 04-14-2008, 12:47 PM
Rocky Raab's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Utah
Posts: 3,321
Nope, that still doesn't tell you anything except how good a certain primer is at launching plastic bullets. Primers are designed to ignite smokeless powder. Doing just that and recording the results with different primers is the only way to rank them for the job they are intended to do. Even at that, one could argue that we might get a different ranking when using spherical versus extruded or flake powders. And that's probably true.
__________________
To see my books and articles, just Google my name.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Pistol Primers for Rifle Use? batman27409 Handloading Procedures/Practices 9 08-21-2006 08:23 PM
Using small rifle primers for 38 special in an 1894c BenA Marlin 1894 Lever Guns 10 07-17-2005 07:24 AM
Small concealed carry pistol reccomendations loraksus Handguns 30 04-27-2005 01:44 PM
Magnum vs. Standard Primers Leanwolf Handloading Procedures/Practices 5 02-15-2004 06:36 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 08:16 AM.

< Contact Us - Shooters Forum - Archive >

 
 

All Content & Design Copyright © 1999-2002 Beartooth Bullets, All Rights Reserved
View Privacy Policy | Contact Webmaster | Legal Information
Website Design & Development By Exbabylon Internet Solutions
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2