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  #1  
Old 02-18-2012, 10:05 PM
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Scales


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Well I just finished building some new loads using the new scale I got. I started reloading recently and bought a lyman beam scale and a hornady digital scale. The lyman was incredibly hard to set to the right weight and would hang up from time to time. So I constantly was checking it against the digital scale. So every load ended up going from one scale to the other several times. And changing to a different charge was always full of frustration.

I gave up on it and bought a RCBS 1010 which was praised by many people in forms and on dealer sites. Well what a difference. Easy and sure when setting it up. Used the electronic scale to get an idea of what the powder dispenser threw and then put it on the beam scale. Every time it agreed and moved predictable as I trickled powder in. I bumped the beam a few times to see if it would go back to the same spot and every time it did.

My loading time just dropped by an significant amount. Oh and the electronic scale is always good to plus or minus 2 grs so it gives good assurance that I am in the ball park. But it now makes better sense to rely on the beam scale.

My one bit of advice is to not buy a lyman scale.
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  #2  
Old 02-18-2012, 10:14 PM
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Congratulations, I am glad you got this issue cleared up. I imagine any anxiety over the old scale has subsided. Now get out and shoot some.
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  #3  
Old 02-19-2012, 09:30 PM
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Yea I tried to save some money and it cost me. Not sure why I chose that scale because I usually do a good amount of research before buying. Guess I was in a hurry to get all the gear you need. I think for now the new scale will be good enough to load the number of shells that I will use. I loaded 32 shells in maybe a bit more than an hour and a half. Not sure exactly because I do not want to think about how long it takes. So far I mostly prepare the brass one day and load the next.

Its a great scale and with only a little bit of attention you are set up and on the money. I still double check with the electronic to see if I am set up right. No I do not use the electronic to make sure the load is right but it always is within .2 grs so I can tell if I am set up right or not. With the new scale not a single instance where I had not set it up to the exact weight I was after.
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  #4  
Old 02-20-2012, 01:10 AM
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I tend to tumble, size and decap, clean the lube off, trim, chamfer in and out, and primer them on one day, and then add the powder, seat the bullet, and crimp if needed on another day. It seams to break up the monotony of it all. I couldn't venture a guess on the actual time it takes per round. Doing it this way, the first steps are generally done while watching television or something mindless, while the seconds part is done when I am totally focused on the task at hand. The second part is the only time it truly feels like I am working on something. I know all of the steps involved seem like a lot but like I said the second stage is the only time it feels like work. The first stages just feels like I'm cracking pecans or something menial.
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  #5  
Old 02-20-2012, 07:58 AM
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Nice scale indeed. I've used the RCBS 505 for years and have always been happy with it. So your 10-10 is even better. Did you get a scale check set? Even one certified weight would be good.
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  #6  
Old 02-20-2012, 10:20 AM
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It seems to me that the 10-10 is just designed to look different and has a weight to allow you to weigh in excess of 500 grs. I did buy the weight checks but only checked the accuracy of my electronic scale. Compared to the Lyman it is night and day. I only got the 10-10 because I read so many comments about that is the scale to buy and I did not want to go cheaper and find I should have just got the 10-10.
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  #7  
Old 02-20-2012, 10:57 AM
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i just purchased a rcbs 502 and reading this i'm glad i did. i was thinking of the electronic scales but i never have trusted anything electonic when it comes to measuring. even my volt meter starts going crazy when the battery gets low i would hate for that to happen loading rounds that could have a not so good ending.
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  #8  
Old 02-20-2012, 02:21 PM
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I'm thinking of retiring my 40 year old Redding beam scale.I was leaning towards the electronic jobs,and then remembered my experiences with digital micrometers and calipers,and why I do not own any of them. Sounds like the 1010 is for me.
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  #9  
Old 02-20-2012, 02:40 PM
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If you incline to a digital scale, get the one from Berry's Mfg. http://www.berrysmfg.com/products-c107-Winstead_Peters.aspx

I just got one for writer's review and am very impressed. It can run on batteries or the supplied AC wall wart. It seems to give accurate readings unless the batteries are completely dead, with no variation whatever. The ONLY complaint I have with it is that the sturdy plastic case it comes in seems to develop a static charge. (The company acknowledges this.) All you have to do is take the scale out and let it sit for an hour. That dissipates any charge the scale may have picked up.

Other that that, this unit is golden. No -- PLATINUM.
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  #10  
Old 02-20-2012, 02:44 PM
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This is almost the exact same story as me except I started with a lee scale and I had a $15 digital scale. So i did the same things as you and bought a 1010 and I am very happy with it. I also do the same as you with using both scales. Definitely saved me time and I would recommend this scale to anyone.
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  #11  
Old 02-21-2012, 06:19 AM
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A man with two watches never knows what time it is...

But anyway, for reloading, repeatability is far more important than accuracy to the hundredth of a grain.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocky Raab View Post
If you incline to a digital scale, get the one from Berry's Mfg. http://www.berrysmfg.com/products-c107-Winstead_Peters.aspx

I just got one for writer's review and am very impressed.
Rocky,

In the link it says "accurate to a tenth of a grain" Do you know what the resolution is in grams? I have seen scales that measure to 0.01g then convert to grains, and in doing so the rounding errors it will "skip" a tenth of a grain. This was easily repeatable with a powder dribbler. I guess it could depend on how the firmware is written.

Last edited by kludge; 02-21-2012 at 06:22 AM.
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  #12  
Old 02-21-2012, 06:48 AM
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Well, when I weigh a bullet in grains and then change the scale to grams it comes out 3.51g so I have to assume it weighs to the nearest 0.01 gram. Changing back, it reads 54.1 grains with no dithering between tenths at all.

Oh, and it truly does not need a warmup, and is ready to use in less than three seconds, as advertised.
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  #13  
Old 02-21-2012, 07:19 AM
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I salute Berry's for trying to make a completely-made-in-USA electronics product! Perhaps I'll need a digital scale one day, and will certainly look to that one at that time.
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  #14  
Old 02-21-2012, 09:32 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kludge View Post
A man with two watches never knows what time it is...
But anyway, for reloading, repeatability is far more important than accuracy to the hundredth of a grain.


......................
I have seen scales that measure to 0.01g then convert to grains, and in doing so the rounding errors it will "skip" a tenth of a grain. This was easily repeatable with a powder dribbler. I guess it could depend on how the firmware is written.
Outstanding quote, Kludge!

Regarding the digi-scales skipping tenths of a grain, I can attest to that. I have three of the cheaper (under $50) digital scales - two Hornady's and a third one whose brand escapes me at this moment. None of them are consistent and all will sporadically skip 1/10 of a grain, rounding themselves off to the next "even" or "odd" tenth, depending on their temperment on that particular day. One of the Hornadys will never measure in odd tenths. It's an even-only scale, and with it's "rounding off" ailment, you can esily be off by .2..... easily. Not that it's necessarily alot, but it's just not at all consistent, as you say, and it's irksome.

Also, all three will (again depending on temperment at the instant moment) resettle themselves at odd times and require zeroing, sometimes after every few charges and sometimes not for a whole session. Tempermental and evil little machines, they are.
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Last edited by StretchNM; 02-21-2012 at 09:38 PM.
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  #15  
Old 02-22-2012, 07:56 AM
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The powder trickle test will easily weed out those scales.

I'm on a "cheap" scale kick. The first one I tried a few years back didn't last long, and would skip tenths. It's base measurement was 0.01g and then it converted to grains. No good. For the last couple years I've been using a bargain basement scale (like $22 shipped from Asia) that is exactly like a $80 American Weigh. Since then the American Weigh has come way down in price. It's a 0.001g scale and resolves to 0.01gr... which can be a bit of a distraction. The only bad thing so far is the shape and placement of the sensor and the size of the pan... it's meant for jewelry not weighing powder. No worries I just tare it with my other powder pan.

I have measured it against at $1500 Ohaus lab balance... and it would take a check weight costing several hundred dollars to tell me which one is more accurate. The Ohaus wins on repeatability, but the cheap scale has more than enough accuracy and repeatability for hand loading.

http://www.dealextreme.com/p/digital...solution-10515

Cons: The "pan" it comes with doesn't work for powder. It maxes out at just over 300gr... so if your into sorting your really heavy bullets, you'll need something else. No AC power.

Generally speaking I prefer a beam balance... maybe I'll get a nice one some day.

Last edited by kludge; 02-22-2012 at 08:16 AM.
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  #16  
Old 02-23-2012, 09:59 AM
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I have a Lyman D7 scale and find it to be very accurate and the quickest beam scale to settle I've used. Drop the load in the pan, beam goes up once and then settles...and I can not imagine what could be incredibly difficult to adjust on it (or any other beam scale for that matter)???? I'm not real fond of the "tenths" setter, but it's the same as the one on the RCBS 502. I do prefer the "wheel" type setting on the 1010 and the 510, but the Lyman or the RCBS 502 are not what I would call difficult..YMMV obviously..

the 1010 IS a fine scale though.......probably the pick of the litter for beam scales.

Last edited by simcoe; 02-23-2012 at 10:01 AM.
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