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  #1  
Old 02-12-2011, 08:22 PM
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Reloading .22 Caliber, 0.224" Diameter, 46 Grain HP


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I recently bought several bags of WB22HP46 assuming I could load them into my prepared .223 cases for an AR-15. The rounds are .22 Cal, 46 grain hollow points with a .224 diameter. Using a Micrometer they average out at a length of .45 inches. Problem # 1, i've found zero knowledge on loading a 46 grain anything for .223 cal. I only have one reload book atm and that is a Hornady 7th Edition which offers no help (for this). I have looked extensively online with the same results. Problem # 2, so far, all info that is tagged or related to the specific round (WB22HP46) points towards ballistics/load data for a .22 Hornet or similar round. Does anyone have any ideas on where to look to find load data for these rounds? I have a mind to wing it,,,,, I know that sounds bad. If I took load data for a 45 grain bullet, seated the 46 grain bullet the same depth and used the same type and measurement of powder, shouldn't my results downrange be close to the same? I recognize that the C.O.L. for a hollow point is different than a V-MAX or Soft Point type bullet. I would appreciate any impute or idea's from anyone willing to throw me a bone.
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Old 02-13-2011, 02:42 AM
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I don't know if you can use 46 grain Hollow Points in your .223 AR-15, as you might have feeding issues since the bullet is a blunt point & not a spitzer. Here some reloading data on the .223 though.

http://www.reloadersnest.com/frontpage.asp?CaliberID=18
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  #3  
Old 02-13-2011, 09:06 AM
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0341,

As you noted COL won't match for a blunt vs. a spitzer shape. What you need to match instead is seating depth. That is how far the base of the bullet goes down into the case.

Seating Depth = Case Length + Bullet Length - COL

You can use the information about a known bullet to get its seating depth from that. To match the seating depth with your bullet, rearrange the above formula and substitute the seating depth you got for it to get a COL for the second bullet.

COL = Case Length + Bullet Length - Seating Depth

In your case, however, with a short, flat base bullet, I would just seat it 0.224 (1 caliber) deep unless the ogive narrows the bullet before then. That would mean your COL is:

COL = Case Length + Bullet Length - Seating Depth
COL = 1.760" + 0.45" - 0.224" = 1.986"

Note I used the usual SAAMI maximum case length rather than what your actual trim length is. I do that just to have it work with all cases, but you can adjust it using your trim length if you want. I don't think 0.010" one way or the other will be likely to show up on the target. If you bullet bearing surface is shorter than .224" and the radius of the nose departs the bearing surface before that seating depth, you may have to seat out a little more.

From that starting point I would just use about any 45 or 50 grain bullet starting load with a relatively fast powder like one of the 4198's. Maybe go as slow as Reloader 10X, but no slower. The starting loads will be 20 grains for either IMR or H4198, and 21 grains for 10X. Figure to be able to work up a couple of grains before the load starts to compress. Watch for pressure signs as you go.
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Old 04-14-2012, 03:48 AM
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did you have any results in loading this? I have about 500 of these bullets and wanted to see if you had any good results with these in your ar?
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Old 04-14-2012, 11:51 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Solus View Post
did you have any results in loading this? I have about 500 of these bullets and wanted to see if you had any good results with these in your ar?
I'm going to guess that the bullet is for a .218 Bee. I'd load it short, and crimp. I don't think it will come apart even with a very fast twist. If it does, drop me a line
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Old 04-16-2012, 04:31 AM
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First thing I thought of was a 46 gr. bullit and a 1-9 twist. Can they stay on the paper past 100 yds? Just a question. Lou
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Old 04-16-2012, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by LRShooter View Post
First thing I thought of was a 46 gr. bullit and a 1-9 twist. Can they stay on the paper past 100 yds? Just a question. Lou
Not at 3800fps.

I suspect they were designed for moderate velocities in the 2600-3000fps range. A faster powder might have the appropriate pulse cycle and pressure, but most 46gr bullets ae not for 600M shots.
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