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  #1  
Old 07-16-2011, 04:37 AM
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Cracked 10mm cases I found on the range.


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In range brass about one quarter of the 300 10mm cases I found were cracked with this picture the worst. I have not seen that many or the size of the crack before in any one batch. Is this common in the 10mm or does someone have too large a chamber?
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Cracked 10mm cases I found on the range.-10mm-cracked-case.jpg  

Last edited by Mush from PA.; 07-16-2011 at 06:41 AM.
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  #2  
Old 07-16-2011, 05:58 AM
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None of my 10 mm cases have ever cracked. The owner probably was using old brass. I never reload any cases more than five times, and I never use brass I find on the range.

rt
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  #3  
Old 07-16-2011, 07:30 AM
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Wow. That's pretty bad. Something is definitely wrong!
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  #4  
Old 07-16-2011, 10:18 AM
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Yeah - there's a big split and hole in the case!!!!!
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  #5  
Old 07-16-2011, 10:55 AM
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Possibly a couple boxes of someones "special" reload picked up on the internet...lot of interesting reading out there on loads some folks recommend. Read a post the other day that stated " sammi specs are merely starting guidelines, it's ok to exceed, just watch for case head expansion." WTF.. I could see where a new reloader could get into trouble with information like that... also shooting an autoloader that spits the brass out, they may not even bother to look at the brass to check for any issues. Rack em' and crack em'......whoo-hoo!!!! And it's quite possible I'm just a cynical old coot..
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  #6  
Old 07-16-2011, 10:59 AM
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Originally Posted by rt4567 View Post
. . . I never use brass I find on the range.
rt
IMO, some of the best once-fired handgun brass can be found left lying on the ground at any local range. The secret is to "mine" the brass at the 5 and 10 yard line where the newbies and non-reloaders shoot. Thanks to them, I have a lifetime supply of handgun brass that I have yet to make a dent into. Good used brass will still look new on the inside of the case with lots of clean brass showing. If I pick up a case with a lot of carbon residue on the inside, it gets returned to the ground. With the cost of brass being what it is, scrounging on the range pays off. YMMV
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  #7  
Old 07-16-2011, 11:18 AM
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This 10mm brass is from a LEO requal at the range. Along with a ton of 40, 9mm, 223, 38SP, and even some 380. I found the same cracks in 10mm brass last year after the shoot. I do not know if they are issued or personal weapons. Some of the cracked brass looks new. I just have not seen that many and the same cracks in range brass.

99% of my own brass is picked up from the range. Call it recycling, cleaning up, or saving $$.
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  #8  
Old 07-16-2011, 01:31 PM
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Quote:
IMO, some of the best once-fired handgun brass can be found left lying on the ground at any local range.
You can say that again. I have thousands of cases in different calibers that are all range pick-up. I guess I get lucky belonging to a club. I RO at IDPA and Glock matches and the RO's get to keep the brass. After a match I usually walk away with around 1,000 pieces of mixed brass. Most people have factory ammo in factory boxes so most of it is once fired.
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  #9  
Old 07-16-2011, 04:52 PM
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Must be nice. 10mm around my parts are rare. 1 in a 100 only know what you're talking about when you say 10mm. 38, 357, 9mm and 45 ACP is about all one finds around here.

If I saw a piece of brass come out of mine like that, it would scare the crap out of me
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  #10  
Old 07-17-2011, 04:52 AM
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Those look like they were fired from an MP5 or similar gun with a fluted chamber. That is what caused the striations down the case. I have a bunch of those cases that I fire in my 10mm but I am watching them carefully and only shoot them in the 610. I figure when they go, in the 610 it won't matter much.
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  #11  
Old 07-17-2011, 05:52 AM
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I'm also noticing the small discoloration at the head at the bottom right. It's a typical looking oxidation discoloration spot. Makes me wonder if the ammo was stored near a cleaning agent cabinet and was exposed to ammonia vapor or if it was cleaned with an ammoniated polish directly? That will make it split more easily (see the Wikipedia entry on Season Cracking).
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  #12  
Old 07-17-2011, 05:20 PM
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Thank you all for the info. I never knew of a fluted chamber. That would explain the carbon stripes. Just to show the one case was not a fluke, here are a few more. I have a pile of others that are going in the scrap brass bucket.
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Cracked 10mm cases I found on the range.-10mm-cracked-cases-6-.jpg  
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  #13  
Old 07-17-2011, 06:30 PM
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What headstamp is on the brass? Are they all the same make?

I've seen "commercial" reloads fail on the range; but those failures were from excessive pressure. I don't see any swelling near the case head on the examples you've shown that would suggest high pressures. It does seem as though the brass is brittle.

Best,

Trad A. Non
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  #14  
Old 07-18-2011, 05:19 AM
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Originally Posted by Mush from PA. View Post
. . . Just to show the one case was not a fluke, here are a few more. I have a pile of others that are going in the scrap brass bucket.
How could the shooter not know that his ammunition was failing on ignition? There should be smoke coming out of all the wrong places on his weapon. Common sense dictates that he stop shooting for his own safety and the safety of others around him.
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  #15  
Old 07-18-2011, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by trad_a_non View Post
What headstamp is on the brass? ...
All cases are the same make:

"F C 10mm AUTO".
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  #16  
Old 07-18-2011, 03:03 PM
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That looks pretty uniform. My guess would be the firearm was designed to destroy the brass on eject to prevent it from being reloaded by the enemy, or the brass was damaged or is defective like a solvent soaked into the box and ate away at the brass in one consistant place perhaps, as Nick suggested above.
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Old 07-19-2011, 06:34 AM
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Actually, I think the last post answered it. FC brass. I take back what I said about it maybe being brittle; the holes are pretty big for that, anyway. FC is known far an wide for producing softer brass that everybody else. In rifles, if you fire high pressure loads, the primer pockets can widen with the first shot. Indeed, some of Federal's own commercial loads are known to do that.

Dan Newberry says he doesn't consider Federal brass reloadable for the above reasons. Most find it usable if they are loading to mild pressure for the round, though. I've never had issues with their .45 ACP brass, for example. But in this instance, if you collected any FC brass that isn't blown open, relegate it strictly to very light target loads or toss it. Not worth getting a face full of blow-back through the spaces between slide and frame, as happens when a case lets go in an self-loading pistol. Don't ask how I know.
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Last edited by unclenick; 07-19-2011 at 10:52 AM. Reason: typo fix
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  #18  
Old 07-19-2011, 10:36 AM
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I saw an aluminum-cased Blazer round from a 9mm with a hole in it, once. Was standing next to the shooter when it happened. Quite the spectacular fireball out the ejection port Only one case did it, so I suppose that one just had a thin spot?

Fortunately, the gun was an all-steel Browning Hi-Power and didn't seem to hurt it a bit.

I cannot imagine going through a magazine full of 10mm and not being aware of such a problem....
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  #19  
Old 07-19-2011, 11:56 AM
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I think the OP mentioned the brass was from a LEO qualify session so the officer may have just dealt with the fireballs and kept on so he didn't screw his qual.
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  #20  
Old 07-19-2011, 12:00 PM
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I think the FC brass may be the reason I was handed about 250 rounds of 9mm a while back. My brother in law was having a lot of split case heads in his Sig but they seemed to run ok in my para ordinance. come to think of it they were FC brass and may have been reloads. most didn't look like these, more like typical case head separtions from over pressure but would be explainable if the brass were too soft.
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