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  #1  
Old 10-04-2012, 05:43 AM
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22-250 bullet wieght for 14" twist


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My Browning 22-250 rifle has a 1:14" twist, which seems slow to me for heavier, higher BC bullets. I am currently using IMR 3031 and 8208 XBR powder (maybe a little fast for heavier bullets). From personal experience out there what are the practical bullet weights to use in a barrel such as mine? 50-60gr seems to be the "norm", but if I can go 62gr, 70gr (or more) and still stabilize the bullet with that twist rate I'd like to hear from someone who has. Experience speaks louder than hypothetical numbers on paper! Accuracy at longer ranges is my objective.
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  #2  
Old 10-04-2012, 05:53 AM
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Sierra has a 63gr. semi-pointed. Someone makes a 70gr. semi-pointed bullet, maybe Speer, but I'm not sure. My guess is that those will be the top weight. The Sierra bullet is accurate in my rifle, but I'm not sure if my gun is a 1-14" twist or 1-13." My rifle has a Douglas barrel and the rifling is quite shallow and it's difficult to measure the twist rate accurately.

My rifle will shoot the 52 / 53gr. Barnes "X" bullets, which shouldn't work with a 1-14" twist, so that sorta makes me think I measured the twist wrong.

Anyway, I'd try Varget with the 63gr. Sierra and see how that goes.
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  #3  
Old 10-04-2012, 07:54 AM
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I have a 22-250 with a 1 in 14 barrel. It shoots best with 50-55 grain bullets, although i haven't tried the lighter ones. Anything 60 grain and higher it seems to slip in the accuracy department. Pet load in this rifle is a 53 Grain Sierra MK ahead of 37.0 grains of H380
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  #4  
Old 10-04-2012, 01:53 PM
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Mine's a Tikka Varmint, 24" 1:14 Twist. It will shoot 1/4" - 5/16", five shot groups with 50 and 52 grain bullets, the 52 grain target giving the smallest groups. 1/2" groups are the smallest I've ever been able to consistently get from 55 grain. I've never tried 60 grain because of the fact 55 grains don't shoot that great. I've tried several different brands of 55 grain, some not as good as others. Hornady's are doing the best so far.
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  #5  
Old 10-04-2012, 02:06 PM
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52 grain target bullets were designed around the 1 in 14" twist. Should be able to shoot all bullets 55 grains and down well though. If varminting I recommend the 50 grain Sierra Blitzking shoots good and great terminal effect. i had great shooting loads with RL15 and N140.
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  #6  
Old 10-04-2012, 09:37 PM
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I was at Bass Pro Shop this afternoon and picked up a box of 62 grain, Barnes Tripple Shocks and on the box it states must be at least 1:9 twist. I didn't buy these for the 22-250, they are for a 223 that I'm having built with a 1:9 twist barrel. Of course Barnes are extremely long bullets, so it's going to take a lot more twist for theirs.
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  #7  
Old 10-04-2012, 09:52 PM
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A friend has a 1-14, 22-250 and his will shoot the 50gr and 55grs really well. We shot some of the Federal 60gr Nosler Partition that are loaded to 3500fps as well as some of the Hornady Custom 60gr Interlock loaded to 3600fps. The Hornady shot better I think because of the little faster MV, the Federal wasn't just real bad but the Horn was better. We tried a Winchester load that had a 64gr bullet loaded in it and it was a no go, not very good accuracy.

Last edited by fred243; 10-08-2012 at 11:39 AM.
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  #8  
Old 10-05-2012, 02:45 AM
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I replaced my Savage barrell with an ER Shaw 1-14 and the load it likes is 38.2 Gr. H380 and a 55 Gr. V-Max FLAT based bullet. V-Max comes in flat or boat tail and for some reason that barrell likes flat based bullits and ball powder. With stick powder and boat tail bullets the groups open up quite a bit. Best group so far at 100 is .188. Haven't shot this pat 100 yds yet as the corn was in the field, they took care of that last night and now have 200 yds again to shoot. Lou
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  #9  
Old 10-05-2012, 07:22 AM
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Thanks for the responses. A lot of questions answered. Sounds like my best bet is to start around 52gr plus or minus a couple. I had no idea what that twist rate was really designed for. I had wondered about the all copper vs lead core as well (since the copper bullets are longer for the same weight). I didn't know if twist was for weight or length.
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  #10  
Old 10-05-2012, 09:01 AM
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I usually start with a couple different weight hunting bullet, one for long range and one for a shorter distance, that fits what I going to be shooting most. I get those dialed in good enough to make an effective hunting rounds so the rifle is ready for hunting. Then I start my start working on loads with different make and weight bullets to tweak and fine tune the loads
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  #11  
Old 10-05-2012, 12:37 PM
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Sammich,

The main thing to keep in mind is that weight isn't the most important factor in what your rifling can stabilize. Length is. Your 14" twist could stabilize a 100 grain bullet if it were made of something extremely dense, like Gold, because then it would still be short. It could fail to stabilize a 25 grain bullet if it were made of something not very dense, like aluminum, because it would be long. Also, weight itself actually improves stability if you add the weight without increasing length (again, as when using a heavier alloy).

So, when you don't change to impossibly expensive alloys, but restrict yourself to conventional bullet construction, what tables of bullet weights and twists are actually doing is assuming the bullets all have the same proportional shapes. That way, gaining weight corresponds to gaining length, and the person making the usable bullet list has his work greatly simplified. The reality is that the more compact a shape (flat base, shorter ogive) the heavier the weight you can stabilize with your barrel twist rate. Thus you might find you could get away with shooting a 64 grain flat base Berger varmint bullet, but that any boattail over 55 grains tumbles. Unfortunately, the only way to find out for sure is to pay your nickel and take your chances. Stability estimating software sometimes works out but isn't always reliable. In the .22's, in particular, I find the Miller formula can underestimate stability. But not always.
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Last edited by unclenick; 10-07-2012 at 06:12 AM. Reason: typo fixes and clarification.
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  #12  
Old 10-05-2012, 03:35 PM
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Oh how true Unclenick. Over the years, I've accumulated 2 1/2, 50 cal ammo cans full of bullets I've shot maybe 10 out of and caned the rest for one reason or another. Just like that box of Barnes TSX I just bought at almost $1.00 per bullet. I've never shot Barnes but keep reading about how great they are for long range shooting, and I figure that 223 is going to need all the help it can get for 400+ yard shots and stlll kick a yote's butt. If it does give me a good, long range load, it's definitly a bullet I won't be punching much paper with. If it don't work out, another box of bullets for the can.
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  #13  
Old 10-07-2012, 06:25 AM
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IIRC, the 14 inch twist was for the .222 Remington with 50 gr bullets. The .223/5.56x45 14 inch twist barrels gave so-so accuracy with the 55 gr military load. Barrels were changed to 12 inch twist and were a lot more accurate.
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  #14  
Old 10-07-2012, 07:23 AM
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Ironhead,

They played with the twists. I don't think I ever knew what the sequence of development was, but at some point Stoner wanted to go from 12" to 14" because the lower stability bullets tumbled in ballistic media more readily, making the FMJ more lethal. It also shortened usable aimed fire range because of bullet tumbling in air.

Today the AR-based military weapons all have a 7" twist. That choice was made because it is needed to stabilize the very long-for-their weight M856 tracer bullets (see cutaway drawing on extreme right, here). It also happens to work well with long 75 and 80 grains VLD shapes, but you have to seat those out too long for a magazine, so they have to be loaded singly.
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  #15  
Old 10-07-2012, 08:12 AM
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I was a Small Arms Repairman for the Army 69-72. The original barrels were 1 in 14 and had no liner. A good one would shoot the military load into about 4' or 6' at 100 yards. The leade also wore out quickly on full auto. Most barrels were worn out like that when we received them at our Depot shop. The bullets really did tumble right out of the muzzle in these worn barrels. Made nice clean side views of the bullets on targets at 25 yards.

The next barrel was 1 in 12 with a Stellite liner for about 8 inches or so up from the chamber. This cured the worm leade problem. The full chromed lined barrels came out sometime in 1970.

With a scope, the 1 in 12 barrels would group into about 1 inch at 100 yards. It seems to be the perfect twist for the 55 gr military bullet.
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  #16  
Old 10-08-2012, 11:11 AM
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It must be that Stoner wanted to go to 15" or 16" then. All I recall was he wanted to make the bullet less stable for easier tumbling in the target.
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  #17  
Old 10-10-2012, 11:07 PM
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I had the same intention of using a heavier bullet when I got a 1 in 14" 22-250 a few years back, but achieved really mediocre accuracy with bullets over 60 grains. I finally stuck with a 55 grain boat tail (Nosler Ballistic Tip), and acquired a 1 in 9" 223 for heavier bullets. The 223 works as well with 69 grain match bullets as the 22-250 does with the 55's. Happy with both rifles, and their intended purposes.
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  #18  
Old 10-18-2012, 03:27 PM
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Glad I came back to look at additional remarks - more good info. I understand now that twist is based on bullet length more than weight. So maybe I should move away from boat tails in this rifle if I want to go heavier. I had read that twists ranged from 9 - 14 in this caliber, but most seemed to be at the 14 end. I don't like to whine about any caliber, but just want to use "what works best". I just don't have the funds to buy lots of different bullets, so wanted a good point from which to start. Thanks again for your comments, all.
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  #19  
Old 10-20-2012, 07:11 PM
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I have a Remington 700 in .22-250 with a 1-14 twist.

Shoots 55 grain and less weight bullets very well, the 52 grain bullets are pretty impressive, regardless of maker.

I can get a 70 grain SP (round nose, flat base) Speer bullet to group fairly well. Should I feel the need to shoot something heavier than a ground hog.

I tried some of the Sierra 69 HPBT beautiful bullets. Grouped like a modified choke shotgun. Except for the one in five that wouldn't find the target at all.
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  #20  
Old 10-21-2012, 12:11 AM
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twist rates

I have a 16 1/2 inch custom T/C barrel in 22 Bench Rest which I shoot 60 grain Nosler Partitions from and it is very accurate. That bullet is about the heaviest it will handle and to be honest that bullet will do everything I expect from that calibre, crows, rabbits, foxes through to roe/muntjac/chinese water deer so I have no intention of changing unless Nosler cease manufacturing it.
Now my 257 has a 1-9 twist rate because I needed to be able to shoot the 100 to 120 grain bullets and my experience with a slow twist(1-14) 257 Roberts suggested that the 117/120 bullets did not perform well so I now shoot the heavier Hornady SSTs out of that(1-9) with great success. My range of options covers my needs. 17HMR 17gr 17 Rem 25gr 22BR 60gr 257RRI 117/120grn 7-30 Waters 139grn 300 H&H 175grn 375JDJ 250grn not much I wish to hunt, that I cannot cover with these.
I am old enough to have had my loading bench shelves full of every conceivable bullet weight that my house was starting to lean in that direction.
Today I have one calibre ...one bullet.
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