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  #1  
Old 02-26-2013, 06:57 PM
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Hornady 75g Bthp .224


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Hey guys I have some 22 Cal .224 75 gr BTHP amo that I am going to reload. Any one like this bullets? If so I am thinking about trying my IMR 4064 or IMR EBR 8208 Powder! Thank you
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Old 02-27-2013, 05:38 AM
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You didn't say what you would shoot them in? Barrel length and twist would be good to know.

I have not had occasion to buy any of these bullets since the changeover to the AMP electroplating method of jacket forming was adopted. I got better results from JLK VLD's than with the older cup-and-core 75 grain A-max.

These are long range bullets, intended to be seated longer than the normal SAAMI COLs, so they have to be loaded singly and will be too long for an AR magazine and many other magazines. Once you seat them shorter than about 2.37" COL, the ogive of the bullet starts to go below the case mouth, leaving a gap between the case mouth and the side of the bullet. You can actually do that, but at normal .223 trim-to length, you only have about .19" of neck length to play with, so by the time you get to 2.26" COL for magazine feed, you have only about 0.08"-0.09" of neck hanging onto the bullet. I wouldn't give much for best performance with the low start pressure and longer jump to the lands that would entail.

These are secant ogive bullets, so they are seating depth sensitive like Berger VLD's. The last time I experimented with them (late 1990's) I was unaware of the criticality of that and may not have tuned them equally well. So you've got your load development work cut out for you.

You need enough rifling twist for these bullets. I have a couple of different Hornady boxes, one recommending 8" minimum rifling twist and the other recommending a 9" minimum rifling twist. The stability calculator at JBM thinks 9" would be marginal and not great and that 8.5" or faster would be better, so it splits the difference on the two boxes, depending on temperature and barometric pressure.

IMR 4064 and IMR 8208 XBR are both good powders. In a 24" barrel, H4895 adds 50 to 100 fps more velocity to what those powders will achieve, has good temperature stability and ability to work in reduced loads, and so is what I would probably start with today (I was using Brigadier 3032 in the past, but it's no longer available, the factory having burned down). Unlike IMR 4064, H4895 shouldn't need to be compressed to get to its maximum velocity, but will fill the space under the bullet almost completely.
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Old 02-27-2013, 08:25 AM
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Thx for the info. I am using a mini sass and its a 18" barrel with 1/8 twist. I like the 77g Sierra but I am going to try the 75g.
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Old 02-27-2013, 12:56 PM
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The main difference you'll find, then, is that the 77 grain bullet is a stubby, lower BC shape, intentionally designed that way so it will feed from a magazine in the rapid fire phase of a service rifle match and also as used in the ammunition originally rolled for the Army's Squad Designated Marksmen. The 75 is not.
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Old 02-27-2013, 05:16 PM
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The BTHP bullets are different than the AMAXes. The BTHPs are shorter, and have either a tangent ogive, or else a very 'mild' secant ogive. I find the BTHPs much less sensitive than the AMAXes, and they'll also stabilize in a slightly slower-twist bbl.
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Old 02-28-2013, 04:50 AM
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Ahh! I missread that. I don't have dimensions for that bullet in early version of Litz's book I have. Have never purchased or used that one, but see from QuickLOAD that it is 0.13 shorter.

So, Olllian: Never mind. I have not used the shorter 75. You shouldn't have a seating problem. The powder situation should be that it makes less difference at the top with the bullet base taking up less room. I'd suggest looking at Hodgdon's data for the 77 grain Sierra as a close relative, performance-wise.
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