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  #1  
Old 03-02-2010, 10:29 AM
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1897 Texan


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Was the Texan offered both with & w/o pistol grip? How many years were they made? Thanks. Other than GB, where could I find one for sale?
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  #2  
Old 03-03-2010, 02:41 AM
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You might find one for sale, or attract a seller on the marlin collector's forum. I'm not sure about the stock question because I can't remember for sure which one it came with. i think it was the straight stock though, and whichever it is, that's all it was made in. Other models were made with a pistol grip stock. I have a 1897/1997 Century Limited NIB that has a pistol grip stock. I prefer straight stocks, and would trade it straight across for a Texan or other in the same shape so keep that in mind if that's what you want.
Good luck, and let us know how you make out.
BTW, do you know how much these are going for? Many are north of $1000 now, so be warned. They actually listed for over a grand as knew, but many sold for around $800.
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  #3  
Old 03-03-2010, 04:21 AM
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Thanks.

I'll keep you posted...
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  #4  
Old 03-03-2010, 07:01 AM
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1894's

They never made any 1894's with a pistol grip, did they?
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  #5  
Old 03-04-2010, 01:36 AM
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I've never seen a pistol grip on an 1894, but it probably could be ordered that way. That's the thing about Marlin, nothing is cast in stone. After my post yesterday I did see 1897 Texan's both ways. Go figure. They don't usually waste anything and are famous for using up old parts on new models, putting out a few mongrels. It makes for some interesting pieces for collecting.
I get the idea you don't like straight stocks? That's pretty common. Keep in mind that you can usually buy stocks in either style from Numrich and a few other places for a reasonable price, and fit it to your gun. It may involve bending the tangs a little, but it can be done. There is a guy over on the Marlin Owner's forum that did that to a 39A and it turned out great. I'm not sure which way he went, but it really doesn't matter. Just an idea to get you what you want if you're a handy kind of guy. Good luck!
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  #6  
Old 03-06-2010, 04:05 AM
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Update

Here's my situation: I've got an 11 year old (and three more younger than him) with BB guns and a 10/22. I consider myself a 'Marlin' man - I've got a couple of 1894's - and would like to get an 1897 - Texan or Annie Oakley for the kids/wife. Also would consider a 39a Mountie ( the regular 39's barrel is too long). But I don't want a NIB, never fired, etc., $1000.00 gun. Any suggestions? Thanks.
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  #7  
Old 03-06-2010, 10:55 AM
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1894

Actually, I like straight stocks better - I just never knew they made a pistol grip. That's one (of a few) that's missing from my collection.
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  #8  
Old 03-07-2010, 01:35 AM
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You are going to be very hard pressed to find a Mountie or 1897 that is a decent shooter for less than $500. You'll probably spend around $600 or so for a Mountie. IMO, they are worth the money, being one of, if not the best, 22 lever ever built.
A less expensive alternative is available from Henry. I have the Henry Frontier, Model H001T, which has a straight stock and an octagon barrel. It's awful close to a Marlin 1897 in appearance, and it was $339 new. The action is smooth, and it's shoots extremely well. It's not a Marlin, and although well built for the money, it won't last like a Marlin, but it's a great little shooter, especially for a kid starting out. They do make one also that you can get for around $250, the H001, but it has a round barrel and plastic parts, like the front barrel band and sight assembly if you really want to save.
Hope that helps!
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  #9  
Old 03-07-2010, 08:02 AM
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Thanks.

I think I'll hold out for an 1897. I prefer them over the Mountie, but they'll probably be more $ as well. I definately don't want a Henry (nor a Win.). Sounds like you prefer the Mountie over the 1897 - care to elaborate a little...? Thanks.
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  #10  
Old 03-09-2010, 03:04 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by patepluma View Post
I think I'll hold out for an 1897. I prefer them over the Mountie, but they'll probably be more $ as well. I definately don't want a Henry (nor a Win.). Sounds like you prefer the Mountie over the 1897 - care to elaborate a little...? Thanks.
Sorry if I gave you the wrong impression, but I actually prefer the original 1897. I have one made in the early 1900's that is my absolute favorite rimfire rifle. It has a straight stock with crescent buttplate, and a 26" octagon barrel. The mountie runs a close second. The 1897 commemorative I have is real nice, but I wish it had a straight stock and a full octagon barrel. It's not a shooter anyway. I'll keep the one NIB.
The one disadvantage to the 1897 is that it won't handle HV ammo, only SV. The bolt was not designed to handle HV. That can be rectified by having a new bolt fit by a gunsmith though. The other thing is the barrel. Most guns of that age will have a dark, sometimes pitted barrel from the corrosive powder used in those days. Mine is like that, but still shoots minute of squirrel. The barrel can be relined for $200 or so, so if you find one you like with a rough barrel it can be fixed. Obviously any type of modification will ruin the gun's collector value, but most of the ones out there no longer collectible anyway.
Good luck, and keep us posted. I hope that helps!
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  #11  
Old 03-09-2010, 04:32 AM
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HV vs. SV

You mean an 1897 Annie Oakley or Texan won't shoot just regular, ole bulk-pack, Wal-Mart ammo?
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  #12  
Old 03-09-2010, 07:43 AM
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con't

I'm talking 1280 fps. What would happen if I used the HV in an 1897?
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  #13  
Old 03-10-2010, 01:28 AM
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The Texan and Annie Oakley are modern guns, and will handle HV just fine. The original 1897, built thru the early 1900's should not be used with anything but SV. Any modern 22 Marlin will be fine. Sorry if I confused the issue.
SV is typically more accurate than HV ammo anyway, and works great for plinking and small game hunting. Target ammo is SV.
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