The web's most comprehensive user-interactive handloading database! Find the loading data created by handloaders, for handloaders, post your pet loads, or access and develop your own online loading database with our LoadNotes personal handloading database software. This feature, unique in its concept and intuitive in it's data presentation is fast to access, superbly organized and comprehensive in scope.Our online forums for questions and answers on many shooting and outdoor related topics. A dynamic, active, and well-informed resource for your enjoyment and interaction. Our most used resource on this website! Come share the experience with us!
» Advanced

Go Back   Shooters Forum > Leverguns > Marlin 336 Lever Guns
Register FAQ Members List Donate Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-16-2005, 02:13 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 4
Several questions on Marlin 30-30 lever actions


Registered Users do not see the above ad.


Hello, This is my first post here, I have a few questions about the Marlin 30-30 lever action rifle. I am interested in learning as much as possible about this rifle. When I go to a gun show or pawn shop and look at the Marlin's for sale, I do not have enough knowledge to really know what I am looking at in reference to age, rarity, etc. I need to educate myself better on this fine gun so that when I am looking to purchase used Marlin levers, I feel confident that I am making a wise choice. One question I have: Is there any difference in Marlin levers that are currently produced and Marlins produced in the past? If there is a difference in value or quality, how do I tell the difference, they all seem to look alike in the racks at the shop. I am aware of the Winchester pre and post 64 lever actions, not sure if Marlin lever actions have something similar. Another question: Are there any websites or books on the Marlin 30-30 that would be helpful? I believe that some of the newer Marlins have a "cross bolt safety" added, does this cut down on the value of the gun or ? One thing that I am trying to identify is if there is a certain era of Marlin 30-30's that are desirable because of workmanship, features, etc, I want to be able to spot them among the group that might be hanging on a wall in a shop. Sort of like finding a pre-64 Winchester in a group of post 64 Winchester levers. If this applies to Marlins, please educte me and help me to be able to recognize them. Long post, sorry, please post any and all comment that would help me when evaluating a Marlin 30-30 for sale, I really want to learn all that I can. I am not at all new to guns, I collect, buy, sell and trade guns, but I have neglected learning about Marlins and want to change that. Thanks very much......
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-16-2005, 03:00 AM
Ranch Dog's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Cuero, TX
Posts: 3,484
trenchgun...

Welcome to the forum! Basically you will find that there is not any difference in quality from start to present production in firearms based on the 336 action. The same can be said of the present series of 1894 and 1895 rifles. Marlin has made consistant rifles over the years. I own several as early as 1951 and I've bought new rifles and they are always fine rifles. There might be features, calibers, barrel rifling, barrel lengths, etc. that make a particular model and year more popular than others but they are all outstanding rifles.

The best reference I've found is Bill Murrary's The 336, A Collectors Reference On The Model 336 Marlin. It picks up with the Model 1936 which was offered that year and which led to the present 336 series of rifles. It also includes the 375, various models the 444 and 1895 (45-70). The information is dated through 1980 so it doesn't include the 336ER (356 Win) and 1895M/MR (450 Marlin). It is a nice reference for the type of rifles that you will be seeing at gun shows or pawn shops.

I had a real burning desire to know everything I could about the 444 series of rifles so one step I took was to find every catalog Marlin produced since it's introduction. I bought them all off eBay and since then have kept my source current by requesting a catalog from Marlin each year.
__________________
Michael

Last edited by Ranch Dog; 06-16-2005 at 03:04 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-16-2005, 03:53 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 4
Ranch Dog, I appreciate the great info on the Marlin rifles. I just read a few prior posts, and of course now I have more questions. I saw a reference to "Ballard Rifling" & "Micro Groove" rifling. I was aware of the Micro groove rifling, but this Ballard rifling is new, if that could be explained. Is there a list somewhere that has descriptions of all the various models of the 336, I see reference to models RD, D, H, T, etc. I really need to nail these models down somehow. Also had a question on dating the 336, saw something about the first two digits of the serial number and then using the number 2000 and subtracting the first two digits to get the year? Not sure about that, need more info. Also something about a single letter under the lever, ? , significance of that? Please be patient, probably simple questions for you guys, one of the guns that I like to collect is the U.S. M1 G.I. Carbine, 30 caliber, and you would not believe the mfgs. and variations both military and commercial that that gun comes in, it will make your head swim. Thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-16-2005, 04:07 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Pawnee City, NE
Posts: 701
trenchgun,
I have to second what Ranch Dog said about quality past and present. The big difference is the cross bolt safety which has been on Marlins since about 1982 or 1983. The thing to do is just jump in and get you one....it most likely will not stop there. You will probably find that your Marlin is a real good shooter. You might take a look at Ranch Dogs postal match and see some of the groups shot with those lever guns. I find that my bolt guns dont get shot very much, the leverguns are just too much fun. Although I must admit, I'm getting the itch to look at a Winchester mod 70 in the new 325 WSM.
__________________
IN MEMORY OF PFC JEFFREY ALAN AVARY, KILLED IN ACTION 23 APR 07, AGE 19, MUQUDADIYAH, IRAQ.


"Collector of Loot"
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-16-2005, 06:27 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lauderdale County, Alabama
Posts: 93
Trenchgun,

Cool name!

Something else you can do is stay tuned to this board and MarlinOwners.com. There is lots of useful information on all models of the 336 including Ballard rifling, a most interesting topic.

The 30-30 is an incredible round well suited for close hunting and shots within 150 yards. Though I do not shoot my 30-30 a great deal I favor the 170 gr projectile.

As RD and Big Med said the rifle design has changed very little, but as with anything man made you will find problems now and again. However, Marlin is typically very helpful whenever problems occur.

You may also get a few gents to talk about the .35 Remington round. You may know that Marlin is one of very few makers still manufacturing firearms for this round. Most .35 fans are very timid so you may have to coax them into an exchange.

If you find a good used 336 the prices will vary with geography but you can generally expect to pay $200 to $250.

Big Med, I have the hankering for a .325 WSM and now that you have mentioned it it burns a little deeper. Dang you!

SS
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-16-2005, 06:58 AM
OldWolf's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 459
Trenchgun,
This should help with dating a Marlin:

Marlin year of manufacture maybe determined from the following list of letter/numeral prefixs to the serial number:

1946-C
1947-D
1948-E
1949-F
1950-G
1951-H
1952-J
1953-K
1954-L
1955-M
1956-N
1957-P
1958-R
1959-S
1960-T
1961-U
1962-V
1963-W
1964-Y,-Z
1965-AA
1966-AB
1967-AC
1968-AD, -68
1969-69
1970-70
1971-71
1972-72

Starting in 1973, the year of manufacture may be determined by subtracting the first two digits of the serial number from 100:
Example: SN 2512345 would have been made in 1975 [100 - 25 = 75].
__________________
Regards,
OldWolf
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-16-2005, 07:12 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 4
Guys, Thanks for all of the great info on Marlin levers. That
serial # info is very helpful. I need to get familiar with all of the different models, I was looking thru the most recent Blue Book Of Gun Values just to research all of the different models, good grief there are a lot of them. I would like to start out with a real clean older Marlin and I would also like to find a real clean pre-64 Winchester 30-30. I will be lurking on this site for a while, soaking up Marlin info. I use Trenchgun as my handle on all of the gun forums because my most favorite gun to collect is a military "Trench Shotgun, aka Trenchgun". I was lucky to get a few when the prices were reasonable, decent guns now are priced sky high.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-16-2005, 07:38 PM
Ranch Dog's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Cuero, TX
Posts: 3,484
Trench...

That book on the 336 will answer every question you asked in your post. The author has laid out some excellent charts that cross-reference all the features.

I also saw a reference on Trench guns when I search for the Marlin book at Powderhorn...

United States Combat Shotguns
__________________
Michael
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-16-2005, 08:05 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 123
The early Marlin model 336's used the old Ballard rifling, which is a cut rifling, rather than the newer button method used in the Micro Groove barrels. Nothing wrong with either, but early 1948-55 guns with Ballard rifling are somewhat collectable, and more desireable.
Early guns were not drilled and tapped for scopes, so if you like a scoped gun, don't go that route, but if not this may be another plus.
There is no pre '64 thing with Marlins, as the Winchesters have, so don't worry about any quality issues.
__________________
Marlin lever actions 1870-WWI, and single shot rifles!
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-16-2005, 08:21 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Pawnee City, NE
Posts: 701
Threeeee Tweeenty Fiiiive Maaagnuum, It hear it calling you Side Spin I'll help a buddy out any time I can
__________________
IN MEMORY OF PFC JEFFREY ALAN AVARY, KILLED IN ACTION 23 APR 07, AGE 19, MUQUDADIYAH, IRAQ.


"Collector of Loot"
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-17-2005, 05:15 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: Texas
Posts: 4
I went by a few pawn shops today and I found two Marklin 336's with a "W" prefix in front of the serial #, looks like both of those are 1963 models if I am looking at that chart right, prices were 179 and 199. One of them had a longer magazine tube than the other one, could someone explain that please? I also found a 336CS with the first two digits of the serial # being 04, if I read the chart right 100 - 04 = 96 the year of mfg. This gun was very clean, not shot much if at all, only a few dings in the buttstock. The asking price on the super clean gun was 225.00. Thanks again for all the great info, I am going to keep studying these fine rifles. I am leaning toward a shorter barrel Marlin lever action, I think I saw an 18" barrel length model on the current Marlin Firearms website, I need to keep a sharp ey out for that model. I believe that Marlin at one time made a 16" barrel model called the Texan, correct me if I am wrong, too bad that they discontinued that model. Winchester still makes a "Trapper" 16" barrel model that seems real handy. If someone could clear me up on the different length magazine tubes, i would appreciate it. FYI, our local Wal-Mart here near
Houston, Texas, sells a Marlin lever, not sure of the model yet, for 292 or 293 dollars. I think that prices are regional, it might or might not be more or less in other areas of the country.

Last edited by trenchgun; 06-17-2005 at 05:20 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-19-2005, 03:12 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 123
I'll take a stab at it. You didn't mention the barrel lengths, but Marlin made a 336-C with 20" barrel, full mag, and a 336-SC, with 20" barrel and 2/3 mag tube. They also made a Texan with full mag 20" barrel, and a Marauder with 16 1/4" barrel, and full mag tube.
I'd guess the two you saw were the C and SC, thus the different mag tubes.
__________________
Marlin lever actions 1870-WWI, and single shot rifles!
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-22-2005, 06:13 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Cocoa, Fl
Posts: 44
336

Marlinman,
One more the 336LTS 30-30 16 1/4 full mag late 80's or early 90's. Only made for a short time.
Joe
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-23-2005, 08:16 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Bay Canada
Posts: 1,259
Thumbs up

Quote:
Originally Posted by Sidespin
Trenchgun,

Cool name!

Something else you can do is stay tuned to this board and MarlinOwners.com. There is lots of useful information on all models of the 336 including Ballard rifling, a most interesting topic.

The 30-30 is an incredible round well suited for close hunting and shots within 150 yards. Though I do not shoot my 30-30 a great deal I favor the 170 gr projectile.

As RD and Big Med said the rifle design has changed very little, but as with anything man made you will find problems now and again. However, Marlin is typically very helpful whenever problems occur.

You may also get a few gents to talk about the .35 Remington round. You may know that Marlin is one of very few makers still manufacturing firearms for this round. Most .35 fans are very timid so you may have to coax them into an exchange.

If you find a good used 336 the prices will vary with geography but you can generally expect to pay $200 to $250.

Big Med, I have the hankering for a .325 WSM and now that you have mentioned it it burns a little deeper. Dang you!

SS
I would not call myself a timid 35 Marlin owner. Rather quiet ,maybe keeping to ourselves.
We have a rifle that is a pleasure to shoot and for the most part the 35 Remigton is underloaded and underrated. Load your own and you will see what this number is all about .
Now if it were common knowledge , this would probably put a run on the rifles and drive prices up.
For that reason we tend to hang on to our guns quietlyand walk about with a grin.

Read Ranch Dogs , and Remington 35 posts here and on the other forums, and you will find out for yourself what a sleeper this round really is.

Then again nothin' wrong with the 30/30 . you can go to any ammo store and buy a box cheap and go and hunt.
The 35 Remington is just a little bit more of a hammer.

So be prepared to let one of each follow you home, THEN look out for the 1894 series for they will be knocking on your door soon after that .

This has happened to so many that started out with one good used Marlin It is very catching.
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-23-2005, 09:44 AM
MikeG's Avatar
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 26,486
The latest American Hunter article on deer rifles has to say this about the .35 Rem:

"... the .35 Rem became sort of a 'magnum' .30-30 with a similar trajectory but more thump at the end."

Shhhh, don't spread the word, or prices will go through the roof on used rifles and ammo!!!

Not too many people realize the .35 Rem was one of the first available rifle cartridges in a semi-auto.... the Remington Model 8.
__________________
MikeG

Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb
Welcome to the forum. Rules are simple, be nice and join in.
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-23-2005, 04:25 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Oregon
Posts: 123
Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe in Fl
Marlinman,
One more the 336LTS 30-30 16 1/4 full mag late 80's or early 90's. Only made for a short time.
Joe
Thanks Joe. I didn't mention that one because he was referring to 1960's Marlin 336's.
__________________
Marlin lever actions 1870-WWI, and single shot rifles!
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-23-2005, 05:48 PM
Ranch Dog's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Location: Cuero, TX
Posts: 3,484
Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeG
Not too many people realize the .35 Rem was one of the first available rifle cartridges in a semi-auto.... the Remington Model 8.
Hey MikeG... I don't know if I've shown it to you or not but I got one of those. We need to shoot it the next time you are down!
__________________
Michael
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-23-2005, 06:30 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Lauderdale County, Alabama
Posts: 93
H Snippe,

You had to break the silence unique to us .35 Rem owners. Glad you did, I was about to bust. Can't take anything from the old reliable 30-30 and I will not be parting with mine but the .35 is just one of those rounds you can't help but get close to.

SS
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-23-2005, 07:25 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2003
Location: North Bay Canada
Posts: 1,259
Talking

ShhhhHHHHH!!!!!! Requesting Quiet! Quiet!

Don't say to much out loud, or there will be another one amongst us with that big fat grin on his face.

You know the story "I was looking at the 30/30 but the 35 Followed me home"

Should that fate fall apon you my good friend , all I can say is

Welcome aboard
Get reloading and your "in Love"
Happy

Last edited by Harry Snippe; 06-23-2005 at 07:29 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-24-2005, 07:52 AM
MikeG's Avatar
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 26,486
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ranch Dog
Hey MikeG... I don't know if I've shown it to you or not but I got one of those. We need to shoot it the next time you are down!
Nope... I think you bought it since I was last down there. Dang, I need to shoot a hog!
__________________
MikeG

Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb
Welcome to the forum. Rules are simple, be nice and join in.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
.45-70 Gov't in MARLIN lever action stalker76z Big-Bore Lever Guns 13 09-17-2005 04:39 PM
Marlin 1894C lever gun mack Leverguns and Their Cartridges (General) 7 07-31-2005 04:59 PM
questions from a new Marlin 336 owner... got_the_bug Marlin 336 Lever Guns 13 10-20-2004 06:43 PM
Best BTB sizing for Marlin 45/70 Lever Actions Double D Big-Bore Lever Guns 3 04-30-2004 08:32 PM
Looking for Original Marlin '94 Lever! Ultona Leverguns and Their Cartridges (General) 0 11-18-2003 09:42 PM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 10:52 PM.

< Contact Us - Shooters Forum - Archive >

 
 

All Content & Design Copyright © 1999-2002 Beartooth Bullets, All Rights Reserved
View Privacy Policy | Contact Webmaster | Legal Information
Website Design & Development By Exbabylon Internet Solutions
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2