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  #1  
Old 08-06-2012, 03:30 PM
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how much would you pay to kill a wolf?


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Wisconsin has a wolf season expensive but a season at last!.To kill a wolf legal you have to put in 10.00 to get into the States lottery then if picked 100.00 for a kill tag! This season has about 224 wolf that the State wants to get rid of that seems low since there about 500 to 800 in the State,so what is a wolf skin worth to you? I.m sitting out this year hope for a reduction in fee next year.
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Old 08-06-2012, 03:38 PM
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I never considered how much I would be willing to pay, we don't have the opportunity to hunt wolves. Interesting question. My initial thought was that $100 was quite reasonable.
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  #3  
Old 08-06-2012, 04:22 PM
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I think wolf tags are thirty-something in Idaho.
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Old 08-06-2012, 04:39 PM
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you can get 6 of them this year, plus another 5 if you take the trapping class.
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Old 08-06-2012, 04:46 PM
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I checked the Idaho site and they give a resident a break at 13.00 out of all the States you can hunt wolfs in Idaho 13.00+ Minny - sota 34.00 and my State greedy at 110.00 I think the tree huggers got to the State Rep who wrote the bill for the DNR. well I guess I have to settle for coyotes skins for now.
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Old 08-06-2012, 06:56 PM
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$31.75 for out of state / Idaho. Just bought one!
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  #7  
Old 08-06-2012, 07:26 PM
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Good for you Mike!

Last weekend in the Sawtooth Valley, I was headed back to our Alturas Lake campground from Redfish Lake when we came upon a large group (15-20) of pronghorn, right near the highway, and all bucks. They were focused across the highway and out several hundred yards was one lone wolf, headed the other way due to traffic. Only the second sighting of wolf I've personally had, but the eighth wolf I've seen. I've heard them howling two different times now.

Tags were $11 last year, and the statewide quota wasn't filled. Higher quota this year; just need more hunters and luck.
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  #8  
Old 08-07-2012, 08:02 AM
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I used to hunt in north-central Wisconsin (Clark Co) and rumor was wolves are in that area. I don't know if I would have ponied up $100 for the chance to shoot one, if I saw it.

I'm just glad to hear states are realizing that you can't unbalance EITHER side of the predator/prey relationship. We've been controlling deer/elk numbers for a long time, I'm glad sportsmen are going to be controlling wolf numbers, as well. If you want to see healthy numbers of any kind of animal...hunt it. There's no other way to generate the dollars needed to study and keep the numbers under control.
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Old 08-07-2012, 10:47 AM
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Originally Posted by broom_jm View Post
I used to hunt in north-central Wisconsin (Clark Co) and rumor was wolves are in that area. I don't know if I would have ponied up $100 for the chance to shoot one, if I saw it.

I'm just glad to hear states are realizing that you can't unbalance EITHER side of the predator/prey relationship. We've been controlling deer/elk numbers for a long time, I'm glad sportsmen are going to be controlling wolf numbers, as well. If you want to see healthy numbers of any kind of animal...hunt it. There's no other way to generate the dollars needed to study and keep the numbers under control.

WHEN??WHAT YEAR? they wer just delisted this year so now there legal to kill unless you were doing it SSS.

The way Wis.has it now it is not healthy for the wolfs,the fee is to high and alot of hunters like me will just sit out to the fee is lowered! your still gonna have to many wolf in this State that going to kill the deer heard! and if its like the bear lottery thats 6 to 9 years just think how many WOLFS there would be then!.
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Old 08-07-2012, 05:27 PM
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Originally Posted by jack45/70 View Post
WHEN??WHAT YEAR? they wer just delisted this year so now there legal to kill unless you were doing it SSS.

The way Wis.has it now it is not healthy for the wolfs,the fee is to high and alot of hunters like me will just sit out to the fee is lowered! your still gonna have to many wolf in this State that going to kill the deer heard! and if its like the bear lottery thats 6 to 9 years just think how many WOLFS there would be then!.
I didn't say I could have hunted wolves during the time I was deer-hunting in Wisconsin. I said I don't know if I would have been willing to pay that much money to do so.

Wisconsin has a lot of hunters each fall, but not a lot of wolf tags. My guess is the fee will not be a problem for the guys who want a chance to hunt something unique. If they do not sell out of tags they will probably lower the fee. The bear lottery is in place because more people want to hunt bears than the bear population can handle. Try to realize that the goal in hunting any species is NOT to eliminate it.

Trust the biologists to do their job and regulate wolf hunting in such a way that the wolves and the deer continue to thrive. The sky, as it turns out, is not really falling.
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  #11  
Old 08-08-2012, 05:25 AM
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Originally Posted by broom_jm View Post
I didn't say I could have hunted wolves during the time I was deer-hunting in Wisconsin. I said I don't know if I would have been willing to pay that much money to do so.

Wisconsin has a lot of hunters each fall, but not a lot of wolf tags. My guess is the fee will not be a problem for the guys who want a chance to hunt something unique. If they do not sell out of tags they will probably lower the fee. The bear lottery is in place because more people want to hunt bears than the bear population can handle. Try to realize that the goal in hunting any species is NOT to eliminate it.

Trust the biologists to do their job and regulate wolf hunting in such a way that the wolves and the deer continue to thrive. The sky, as it turns out, is not really falling.
I talked to a game warden about the bear lottery and the 6 9 year wait,he told me back in the early 80's a hunter was allowed to killa deer and if they saw a blackie they could take that to! the TREE HUGGERS made a stink about that and the lottery came into being so is 6 or 9years FAIR?. what bout 4,5 years?.
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  #12  
Old 08-08-2012, 06:20 AM
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I'd pay the $100 just to get rid of one of them. Pay that much to kill a mountain lion too, same reason.
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  #13  
Old 08-08-2012, 10:55 AM
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I'd pay the $100 just to get rid of one of them. Pay that much to kill a mountain lion too, same reason.
You can eat lion stew .............WOLF YUCK!
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  #14  
Old 08-08-2012, 02:48 PM
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On the TrailJournal Sentinel outdoors editor Paul A. Smith offers news, notes and perspective on the great outdoors.
Lawsuit filed to stop Wisconsin wolf hunting season
By Paul A. Smith of the Journal Sentinel Aug. 8, 2012 3:25 p.m. TweetEmailPrint|(35) Comments Citing “state-sanctioned” animal fighting and violations of the state’s animal cruelty law, a lawsuit was filed Wednesday in an effort to stop the wolf hunting and trapping season scheduled to begin this fall in Wisconsin.

The action was filed against the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and Natural Resources Board. At its heart: the state’s rules authorizing the use of dogs to hunt wolves.

“A broad range of Wisconsin citizens oppose the rules established for this season,” said Jodi Habush Sinykin, attorney for Midwest Environmental Advocates. “From hunters to landowners, ecologists to volunteer trackers and community humane societies, there is strong agreement that the season was set up without the restrictions needed to prevent deadly animal fighting.”

The wolf was removed from protections of the federal Endangered Species Act and returned to state management in January. Wisconsin had between 815 and 880 wolves in 213 packs at the end of winter, according to the DNR. The recovery goal was 350 wolves.

The legislature passed and Gov. Scott Walker signed Act 169 in April. The legislation established many rules for the planned wolf hunting and trapping season, including a season from Oct. 15 to the end of February; hunting at night; hunting with bait; and hunting with the use of dogs.

It’s that last provision that has attracted the most opposition and triggered the lawsuit. Wisconsin is the only state to authorize the use of dogs to hunt wolves.

Several acknowledged wolf experts in Wisconsin, including retired DNR managers Dick Thiel and Randy Jurewicz as well as University of Wisconsin researcher Adrian Treves, filed statements warning against the use of dogs to hunt wolves.

The lawsuit was filed in Dane County Circuit Court. Plaintiffs include the Wisconsin Federated Humane Societies, Dane County Humane Society, Wisconsin Humane Society, Fox Valley Humane Association, Northwood Alliance, National Wolfwatcher Coalition, Jayne and Michael Belsky and Donna Onstott.

David Clausen, NRB chairman, and Kurt Thiede, Land Division Adminsitrator for the DNR, both said Wednesday they had not had an opportunity to review the lawsuit and refrained from comment.

Although there wasn't uniform agreement on the rules established by the Legislature, many state hunting and conservation organizations supported the concept of a hunting and trapping season to manage the burgeoning population of wolves in Wisconsin.

Supporters included the Wisconsin Bear Hunters Association, which had a leading role in helping the legislation, as well as the Wisconsin Conservation Congress and the Wisconsin Wildilfe Federation.

"We're not suprised a lawsuit was filed," said George Meyer, executive director of the Wisconsin Wildlife Federation and former DNR Secretary. "It's interesting that it doesn't challenge the delisting but focuses on a form of hunting."

Lawsuits filed in federal court had twice returned the wolf to protections of the federal Endangered Species Act in the last decade. As the wolf population increased in Wisconsin and regionally, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service had sought to remove ESA protections.

Meyer said Chapter 29 of Wisconsin Statutes provides protection to hunting, fishing and trapping from lawsuits that claim the activities are "inhumane."

"The language was put there specifically to prevent this type of lawsuit," said Meyer, also a lawyer. "It will be interesting to see how the judge rules on it."

Meyer said a judge could stop the entire season, could rule to prohibit the use of dogs but allow the other aspects of the season to proceed, or rule that the lawsuit is without merit and allow the entire season to proceed.

In a 2009 case, three Wisconsin men were convicted of animal cruelty after they ran down and killed white-tailed deer with their snowmobiles in Waupaca County. Attorneys for Robby and Rory Kuenzi and Nicholas Hermes argued that the law only applied to domestic animals. However, the conviction stood and the Wisconsin State Supreme Court declined to hear an appeal.

"The court clearly reconciled the fact that wildlife are covered," Sinykin said.

According to information provided by Sinykin, the plaintiffs challenge the "validity of the wolf harvesting rules on the basis that DNR does not have the legal authority to promulgate rules that either authorize or facilitate the violation of existing Wisconsin law. As asserted, by failing to include reasonable restrictions on the training and use of dogs to hunt wolves, the DNR effectively authorizes, allows and facilitates cruelty to animals in violation of Wis. Stat. 951, the state law criminalizing animal cruelty and animal fighting. In addition, Plaintiffs assert that the DNR rule, by failing to include reasonable restrictions to prevent dogs from directly and physically encountering wolves, violates Act 169’s express directive that dogs be used to “track or trail” wolves."

Sinykin said the action was filed to "stay or enjoin" the state's ability to issue wolf licenses before September.

The DNR is selling wolf permit applications thorugh the end of August. Nearly 8,000 had been sold through Wednesday morning. The permit applications cost $10. Hunting and trapping licenses were set by the Legislature at $100 for Wisconsin residents and $500 for non-residents.

The DNR plans to issue licenses by lottery in September. The Natural Resources Board approved the DNR's request for a harvest quota of 201 wolves during the season.

The number of permits available, however, won't be known until American Indian tribes make their declarations. By law, the tribes are entitled to declare 50% of the quota in the ceded territory.

In addition to Sinykin, attorneys Robert Habush of Habush, Habush & Rottier, S.C. and Carl Sinderbrand of Axley & Brynelson, LLP, are representing plaintiffs in the case.

The case is expected to be assigned in coming days. Such cases are typically assigned to a judge at random.


I new something like this would pop up sonner or latter thease people are NUTS they should try and pet one or rub its belly.
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  #15  
Old 08-08-2012, 05:01 PM
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It will depend on the judge. A couple of our wolf seasons in ID were derailed by a sympathetic judge, long after reintroduction goals were met 6x over.

Using dogs to hunt wolves? I'd like to see those dogs, and 'cruelty to animals' is a concern for the dogs, not the wolves.
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Old 08-09-2012, 03:49 AM
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It will depend on the judge. A couple of our wolf seasons in ID were derailed by a sympathetic judge, long after reintroduction goals were met 6x over.

Using dogs to hunt wolves? I'd like to see those dogs, and 'cruelty to animals' is a concern for the dogs, not the wolves.
I can see the wolves, now.... "Hey, look guys...here comes lunch!"

As for the notion of killing as many wolves or lions or bears as possible, I find that puzzling, especially in the state of Wisconsin. Mr. Leupold would be saddened to see his great message lost after so few years. Something tells me if wolves had been part of a balanced ecosystem during the time when he wrote The Sand County Almanac, it would have pleased him tremendously.

Just because we're the apex predator does that mean we have to eliminate the competition?
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Old 08-09-2012, 05:58 AM
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Someone mentioned 'pack'. With 850 or so wolves in 200 or so packs, what do you do about his buddies after he is shot? Or do they focus their attention and appetites on him, and not you? I saw the recent movie 'The Grey', that portrays the wolves as relentless as they are vicious and wonder if it depicts real life wolf encounters. I still want to hunt them.
Thats where a AR comes in handi to have I think a 223 is to light to kill a wolf so a AR in .308 I know that round is not fur friendly but the wolf will be DEAD.And if your a quick shot you can probley take out 3 or 4 of its buddies before they reach you!.
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Old 08-09-2012, 09:24 AM
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Thats where a AR comes in handi to have I think a 223 is to light to kill a wolf so a AR in .308 I know that round is not fur friendly but the wolf will be DEAD.And if your a quick shot you can probley take out 3 or 4 of its buddies before they reach you!.
Does the WI tag process allow you to shoot multiple wolves?

I think I would feel the same reverence and touch of sadness at killing a wolf that I feel when I kill a deer. Are wolves any less deserving of our respect, simply because they are a predator and not a prey species? I haven't heard of any wolves attacking hunters, despite ~1 million deer hunters in Wisconsin each fall. Is there really a question of what the others would do if you shot a member of the pack? Despite all the movies and stories, I suspect the remaining wolves would immediately begin looking for a safer, quieter place to be. Don't you?
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Old 08-09-2012, 10:12 AM
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Does the WI tag process allow you to shoot multiple wolves?

I think I would feel the same reverence and touch of sadness at killing a wolf that I feel when I kill a deer. Are wolves any less deserving of our respect, simply because they are a predator and not a prey species? I haven't heard of any wolves attacking hunters, despite ~1 million deer hunters in Wisconsin each fall. Is there really a question of what the others would do if you shot a member of the pack? Despite all the movies and stories, I suspect the remaining wolves would immediately begin looking for a safer, quieter place to be. Don't you?
I agree. Pretty sure the rest of the pack would retreat to a safe distance. And a 223 would be very lethal.
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Old 08-09-2012, 02:00 PM
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Jason,

I'm afraid you've fallen for the bunny-hugger side of the wolf reintroduction. The wolf packs in the west have decimated game and destroyed the local economies in many areas. Quite a lot of the west makes a living off of logging or hunting, or both. With logging down due to ever-increasing regulations, and a poor economy, having fewer hunters really takes its toll.

And, when the wolves run out of deer and elk to eat, they start eating sheep and cattle. Ask the ranchers and think about it next time you notice the price of meat going up.

There is no free lunch. The wolves consume, too, and ultimately the land produces less - whether its domestic livestock, venison, or hunting dollars. And wolves do attack. Probably less common when the people are armed, but it happens. Do some searching.

Having a bunch of 'protected' wolves is going to do far more damage to the deer population that any form of deer management ever did.
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