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  #1  
Old 03-22-2009, 04:21 PM
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Daniel Boone's rifle


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Out of curiosity I tried to find the maker and school of Daniel Boones's favorite rifle "Tick- Licker". It was not "ol Betsy" like some might think. That was Davy Crockett, and another time frame too. It was called that because he claimed he could shoot a tick off an animal without injury to the beast. It was supposedly given to him by his gunsmith as a gift. Daniel Boone was also a gunsmith if I am not mistaken. I am not talking about the old tv show starring Fess Parker. You remember?... Daniel Boone was a man, he was a big man... (the theme song, for those who are younger than I am). I already knew He was born in Berks County Pennsylvania. It may be a Berk conty rifle but there seems to be no proof of what it was. Doe's anyone have any idea's or information about "Tick-Licker". Here is what I looked at so far. I was just bored as usual and wanted to find something of interest. I know what interests me is not what interests others sometimes. Here are the links I looked at briefly just in case anyone wants to read up a little on the real man behind the folk lore.

http://books.google.com/books?id=1V-...esult#PPA69,M1

Daniel Boone's knife

I knew of this also and I want to make one from an old file and durable yellow heartwood of hedgeapple so that I can throw it occasionally if it is suitable for that. I can throw tomahawks but never really tried practicing with knives. I like the design too. I am interesting in Viking artifacts and runes also. It is the same blade as a Viking Sax.

http://www.dixiegunworks.com/product...78&osCsid=dced

Further reading

http://books.google.com/books?id=63G...m=10&ct=result

http://www.everettarea.org/tales/v06/v06c18.htm

http://www.berkshistory.org/articles/boonegift.html

Hope I am not boring anyone with this. Daniel Boone is cool... ( To me anyway) I bought an uncirculated silver US Mint Commemorative Daniel Boone 50 cent piece many years ago. It was only minted in 1934 to 1938. The likeness is much different than pictures above. 0n the reverse of the coin Boone is speaking with an Indian. The butt of his longrifle rests on the ground and the Indian holds a tomahawk at rest. The coin was made way before the tv series was. There are other U.S. silver 50 Cent Commemoratives with a pioneer theme to them. I also had a 1936 Elgin Illinois Centinial that was mint state 66 of 70 the coin scale. Very Nice! Forgive me If I bore you with any of this.

Last edited by @bullseye; 03-22-2009 at 04:53 PM.
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  #2  
Old 03-22-2009, 05:13 PM
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I've seen that fake Daniel Boone rifle personally.
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  #3  
Old 03-22-2009, 06:17 PM
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I don't know but the stock style just looked all wrong to me. Maybe a well done portrait would be helpfull but still you dont know if it is posed by him or someone else or if therifle pictured is his. You could decuce from datelines about the rifle but its guesswork at best. If the story is true about the rifle being a gift maybe that could be looked into. I am just curious. Berks county rifle sounds logical but who knows for sure? I don't know why it makes me curious. It just does. Whatever it was there's a good chance the tv show rifle is nowhere close. That's worth investigating anyway tho. the Patriot motion picture and Last of the Mohicans (Killdeer) seemed pretty much correct. There used to be a "replica" of Killdeer for sale but I'm not sure if it is made now. It's interesting too but the book was not fact. I read Deerslayer in 5th grade and I never lost interest in things like this. I was born too late I guess. What ye think?
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  #4  
Old 03-22-2009, 09:47 PM
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Ticklicker - The .29 caliber frontier long rifle owned by Daniel Boone (1734-1820), legendary folk hero who lived in the North Carolina-Tennessee-Kentucky areas during the days of the Revolutionary War.
.................................................. ..........
At this hearth Daniel Boone probably studied the little he learned of reading, writing and arithmetic. Above the fireplace hangs a Conestoga (or "Pennsylvania") Rifle, presented to the Homestead by Daniel Beard, another great scout and first National Commissioner of the Boy Scouts of America. The Pennsylvania Rifle was Daniel Boone's chief instrument in opening up the West. It was the "secret weapon" of that day, for it possessed greater accuracy than the smooth bore British shotgun. The people of Kentucky later claimed this rifle, and called it the "Kentucky Rifle," as they have also claimed Boone (!). It has been proven, however, that the Pennsylvania Rifle was first made by our Pennsylvania German (or "Dutch") craftsmen, and was first manufactured in the water-power mills along the Wyomissing Creek in Berks and the Conestoga in Lancaster County.
...........................................

His rifle was a Kentucky Long Rifle he named "Tick-Licker".
............................................

this is what I found out when I searched Daniel Boone also spelled Boon's rifle. The small caliber and the Pennsylvania rifle makes sense as many of them were very small caliber. In some reading I did a while back, they used small calibers and as they wore the rifling out, would re-bore them bigger and bigger. Also when they hunted very large game, a lot of people back then used smoothbore muskets and shot "buck and ball" also bird shot out of them. As they found them more value for hunting.
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  #5  
Old 03-23-2009, 07:30 AM
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I'd say any details of Boone's rifle are lost to history. No doubt Boone owned several rifles in his very long life as a hunter and explorer. That life was hard on equipment. He was several times captured by Indians and it's doubtful he retrieved his own rifle when he escaped. As for a .29 caliber rifle, I very much doubt it. Such a ball would only weigh about 37 grains, about like a .22 rimfire. Would you trust a .22 on bear and buffalo or against Indian attack? And caliber wasn't even designated that way in Boone's time. It would have been so many balls per pound, for a .29 caliber it would be about 190 balls per pound. By far most of the rifles of that day were 40-60 balls per pound, or .45-.50 caliber. Boone may have been presented with a small bore rifle as a gift but I don't think "Ol' Ticklicker" would have been such a toy. Indeed, it may have been 29 balls per pound, which would be about .55 caliber.
Bottom line, it's all speculation and no known fact.
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  #6  
Old 03-24-2009, 11:59 AM
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When I read that .29 caliber thing.. I was taken back as well. It would have made a good small game rifle IMO but hardly anything for an explorer and hunter. Although as the bores were shot out, they often increased the caliber of them. I too would have guessed he had at least a .45 caliber or larger. But like you mentioned a lot of the true facts have been lost in history.
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  #7  
Old 03-25-2009, 07:29 AM
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Actually, the small bore "squirrel rifles" many poeple think of as being a typical "Kentucky rifle" were a later development, after the big game had been killed off, the Indians driven out and the War of 1812 was history. By the early percussion era there was not so much use for a big bore rifle in the Eastern US. The rifle became a toy for small game and Sunday afternoon target matches. That's where you begin to see the .30-.38 calibers come into vogue. In the earlier flintlock anything under .40 caliber would be rare and calibers over .54 were not scarce at all.
I built my Bucks County replica in .50 caliber because that was about mid-range of the calibers in common use at that time, circa 1800 + or - 20 years.
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  #8  
Old 03-25-2009, 11:10 AM
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As an FYI......

In Taos NM, there is a museum which houses many articles which belonged to Daniel Boone. As the story goes, he lived there at one time. I remember seeing a rifle there which was very interesting to me. It didn't have a forearm as I recall. The barrel was also wrapped in a covering of rawhide, "to prevent glare from the sun on the rifle barrel, giving away his position". Not sure how true that was, but whatever.

Might be worth looking into if you like Daniel Boone stuff. When I lived near Taos I would go there from time to time.
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  #9  
Old 03-25-2009, 11:57 PM
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I have an old book from 1930 that I've read a few times called "The Long Rifle" by Stewart Edward White that is about Daniel Boones rifle and the boy who inherited it and went out west and became a mountain man.

Now, the book is fiction. However, like all good fiction, it lays a ground work of fact to make the authors fiction more believable. There is also an author's note at the end giving historical credit to quite a few others in a single page as opposed to using footnotes throughout the book.

Since the book itself deals with a fictional character named Andy Burnett, the prologue leading up to chapter one is a 59 page fact based story about Daniel Boone coming into possession of what is supposedly the first rifled barrel disigned to be used with a patched round ball.

Short version is basically this: Dan'l Boone is journying to Pennsylvania from the then frontier farther west when he comes to a town where a large shooting competition is about to be held. He stops at a local tavern to read the sign about the shoot and while there sees a small dog (description makes it sound like maybe a poodle but basically, it's not a "regular" dog) go into the crowd. Another mongrel dog attacks it and everyone starts yelling "fight, fight!" except for a little girl who the dogs belongs to. Boone figures it' won't be much of a fight as it's not much of a dog and the little girl crying prompts him to step in and stop the fight. Of course, several of the local roughs don't like that and one big fella figures to whup on ol' D. Boone. Dan says he has things to do but will come back at sundown and if he still wants to fight then they'll fight. He walks the girl home and she just happens to be the grand daughter of a Pennsylvania gunsmith named Farrell who is planning to unveil his newly designed rifle at the big shoot the next day. They get to talking guns and Boone finds out that Farrell is nearly an outcast to the other local gunmakers because of his ideas on gun design. He figures all the local gunmakers are stuck in a rut and only make guns that are copies of those made by European makers. Farrell wants to make a gun designed for the american frontier. Longer barrel for better sighting. Smaller bore for powder and lead savings. (52 balls per pound is the size given for his new gun.) A smaller less ornate trigger guard and of course, a patch box in the stock. Other makers of course were making rifled barrels but in this story, Farrell is the first to use a greased patch for an undersized round ball. His theory being to reduce lead fouling and ease loading.

Dan goes back to the tavern, fights the big guy who called him out and ends up breaking the guys arm after learning he didn't fight fair. Next day he finds out that the big guy was a local expert marksman contracted by Farrell to shoot his gun in the big shoot. Boone goes looking for Farrell to tell him the bad news. In the end, Dan'l Boone is asked by the smith to shoot in the other mans stead and totally creams the competition. Farrell is so pleased and gets so many orders for new guns that he gives the rifle to Boone as a gift.

Don't know how much of that is true and how much is fiction, but it's as good a story as any.
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Old 03-26-2009, 07:30 AM
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Truth= zero, fiction= 100% I saw an episode of the TV show very much like that except that it was all Boone's idea and he had a difficult time convincing a gunsmith to build it for him.
No one person "invented" the Kentucky rifle, it was a process of evolution over a span of many years. There are what's called "transitional Kentucky's" which show some of the form of the earlier Jaegers with some of the form of the later, fully evolved, Kentucky rifle.
Whether or not the greased patch was an American invention is debatable. Some writers state as an absolute fact that it was developed in America but there is evidence that German and Swiss Jaeger rifles and British rifles also used a greased patch and no one can say where the idea originated.
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Old 03-26-2009, 08:01 AM
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I did a little research and stand corrected. It was actually Kit Carson who lived in Taos, NM. Sorry about the mis-information.
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  #12  
Old 03-26-2009, 01:10 PM
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It may have been a 29 bore which is a tad over .50 I believe.
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Old 03-26-2009, 03:28 PM
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I don't know, but read somewhere that Boone's rifle was more like a Tennessee Poor Boy. Sure he had several fancy rifles that were presented to him, but his main rifle was a rather plain built rifle. The article said that an explorer would not go through the woods,hunting game or fighting Indians, with a fancy rifle covered with shiny brass and silver. Makes sense to me, but like I said, dob;t know how true it is.
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Old 03-26-2009, 05:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Swampman View Post
It may have been a 29 bore which is a tad over .50 I believe.


That Swampman, would make sense. While the artical I quoted did say caliber, most of the people that write these information history things would not know a caliber from a bore or a rifle from a musket.
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  #15  
Old 03-27-2009, 09:48 AM
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I found a replica of Davey Crocketts first rifle. I love looking at places like this.

http://www.sitemason.com/page/cuV87S
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  #16  
Old 03-27-2009, 11:56 AM
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I found thewe sites. The first one has a picture of one of Daniel Boone's rifles. The second one is referred to earlier about his rifle being .29 caliber.

http://hoover.archives.gov/exhibits/...Who/Boone.html

http://www.tvacres.com/weapons_ticklicker.htm

I think the .29 caliber is more fiction than fact.
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  #17  
Old 03-27-2009, 12:26 PM
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Using Beartooth's Round Ball calculator give me a .54 calibre ball for 29.5 balls to the pound (or gauge).

http://www.beartoothbullets.com/resc...=.54&v2=2876.1

Bye
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  #18  
Old 06-04-2009, 08:30 PM
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Old Ticklicker was NOT a .29 caliber rife.....It shot a ONE OUNCE ball. That would make it a heavy rifle with a bore diameter equal to a 16 guage shot gun. Boone said it was his heaviest rifle, and he used it with great authority for long shots during the Shawnee indian seige of Boonesboro. My source is John Bakeless's Daniel Boone biography written in the 1930s. Unlike so many books written about Boone, Bakeless spent decades researching the real historical Boone, not the mythical Boone. This book is considered to be the best research work ever written on Daniel Boone. It's an amazing story of a true American hero of very high personal integrity. I found it very inspiring.
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Old 06-06-2009, 01:09 PM
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What Jack wrote makes sense to me. If the firearm was a fowler or a musket I could see how this would make sense too. I automatically think of a rifled longrifle but that is an assumption. It's histor-me not history. If it was used for long shots then It makes sense that it was rifled. Maybe a .69 caliber Jeager or transtional rife. a .72 caliber is about equal to a 12 gauge. Its a guestimate. That throws me of track. I sold my Daniel Boone U.S commemorative silver 50 cent piece. It was a nice one but I needed cash. The likeness on the obverse does not look like the paintings I've seen. I think he is speaking to Chief Blackfish on the reverse. If I am not confused about his name. This was minted in the 1930's I believe. it was MS 65 and I didn't want to let it go.
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Old 06-26-2009, 11:58 PM
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A few links I found on the subject.

http://d21c.com/moonbud/Daniel.Boone.jpg

http://books.google.com/books?id=hiX...zOFYmSyASz0Mld

http://www.unicover.com/images/G4574435.JPG
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