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Old 11-29-2011, 04:36 PM
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Keeping powder dry


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I am shooting a .50 round ball traditional flintlock. I am committed to the last 2 days of the Wisconsin muzzleloader deer season this weekend and the forecast is for intermitted rain changing to snow showers. My experience is off the bench sighting in with reasonable weather conditions. I know enough to duct tape the muzzle after loading the main charge but how does one keep the primer powder dry in conditions short of a steady rain?

Brad4
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Old 11-29-2011, 05:02 PM
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You can make a frizzen cover, (cow) out of a piece of flexible leather. The COW, wraps around the gun lock and ties underneath, keeping the rain off the lock. I have also smeared a small amount of grease around the edges of the pan where it meets the frizzen to keep water away from the powder. Glad to see some more traditional muzzle loaders here. I shoot a custom built 62 cal (20 ga) Fusil De Chase smoothbore flintlock musket. Nothing like, CLICK, PSSST, BOOM.
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Old 11-29-2011, 06:15 PM
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Jodum...thank you for the reply. You refer to lightly greasing the pan/frizzen joint...do you suggest something like Vasaline or something more serious? Ia a "cow" cover available commercially as a one size fits most deal or is there a pattern available somewhere for a DIY effort...I am somewhat mechanically challenged!

Brad
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Old 11-29-2011, 07:11 PM
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For the frizzen, I carry a birthday candle with me. Open the frizzen and put your powder in there like normal. Then take that birthday candle and rub it where the fizzen meets the pan. Wax will come off and seal that joint for you.

Then take a chunk of plastic tarp or water proof canvas. Cut a 2x2 foot square. Wrap the lock and frizzen with that chunk of tarp. This is a cow knee. When you get to your stand, sit down, and leave the tart right where its at.

I even saw a person sitting with a shower cap ... you know to keep the wife's hair dry... it was hooked under the trigger guard then pulled up and over the lock. It worked I guess.

For the muzzle get some latex doctors gloves, and cut the fingers off them. Stretch that over the end of the barrel as a muzzle mit. I never like to put tape over the end as duct tape as it gets wet, starts to let go. But if tape is what you like.. then use it.
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Old 11-30-2011, 06:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brad4 View Post
Jodum...thank you for the reply. You refer to lightly greasing the pan/frizzen joint...do you suggest something like Vasaline or something more serious? Ia a "cow" cover available commercially as a one size fits most deal or is there a pattern available somewhere for a DIY effort...I am somewhat mechanically challenged!

Brad
Cows are available from Dixie Gun Works or Track of the Wolf suppliers. I have used vaseline or axle grease to seal the pan. I like the idea of a birthday candle though. I carry a small can (snuff can) of grease in my shooting bag for general use. Here is a link to a lock cover.

Track of the Wolf - Lock Covers
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Old 12-01-2011, 12:49 AM
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wow great info as i shoot a custom 54 cal cap lock but i have a flint that I also want to try out in the hunting woods supose my mink oil for patches would work as well
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Old 12-01-2011, 11:07 AM
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To help keep the priming powder dry I use chapstick. I put a smear around the bottom of the frizzen where it contacts the pan. On the end of the barrel I put a small piece of duct tape. It very seldom rains here during hunting season, usually it is snow falling.
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Old 12-01-2011, 05:45 PM
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Gentlemen...excellent feedback...all I need now is a shot opportunity!

Brad
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Old 12-02-2011, 10:53 AM
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good luck to ya!
keep us posted.
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