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  #1  
Old 04-29-2007, 02:54 PM
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Hunting moose with a .270 Winchester


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Has anyone got experience using a 270 on moose? What is a good load? What would you consider practical ranges for the 270 on moose?

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Russ
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  #2  
Old 04-29-2007, 03:06 PM
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Had a buddy up here (Alaska) that used one for years. He used the 150 grain Nosler Partition and typically took heart/lung shots, taking care to avoid the shoulder/leg bones. He got his every year that he got a shot. I don't know what his exact load was, though. I can't speak how far he actually killed moose, but know of at least one kill of just of about 225-250 yards. Placement is key, probably avoiding those big bones helps a lot.

The Alaskan/Yukon variety of moose is a bit larger than its eastern cousin, so I'd feel comfortable in taking the 270 stoked with a good premium 150 grain bullet such as the Nosler Partition, North Fork or Barnes TSX.

One thing worth mentioning, I think. Moose, at least in my experience and that of my hunting buddies, aren't really that hard to kill, but they take a long time to die. I have seen them go down as if poleaxed, but more often than not, they'll flinched or take a few steps then trot off a ways and stop. They are just big animals and they take time to expire. A lot of people take that to mean they need a bigger rifle. I have noticed larger caliber rifles do seem to put them down quicker, but the 270 Win did a fine job for my friend.
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Last edited by alyeska338; 04-29-2007 at 03:10 PM.
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  #3  
Old 04-29-2007, 09:04 PM
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Welcome to the forum notso. Rules are simple, be nice and join in.

I'll agree with alyeska. I spent five years in Alaska and did a moose every year. There don't seem nearly as hardy as elk are. As long as your do good shot placement and use a premium such as the Nosler mentioned you should do fine.

It's once there down that the job begins. Try not to shoot one in a swamp. I won't tell you the nightmare that was.
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  #4  
Old 04-30-2007, 04:45 PM
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Over the years I've had one hunter who used a .270. As with alyeska, I'm not sure I can positively recall his actual load, but I do know that we talked about it before the hunt. I always point them to a NP bullet, so I'm sure I did with him. He whacked a big heavy bull, at around 140 yards, and the one shot to the lungs was just what the doctor ordered. I'd use a .270 with an appropriate bullet with no qualms. Funny thing, I have a couple of guides that always say "A big bull will carry off a lot of lead." They are right to some extent. That's why I like the lesser leads used in the .270, .280, or sevens!

Practical range w/ .270: Your ability to shoot accurately combined with suitable terminal f.p.e. of 1500, and shot placement. That is, no Texas heart shots at 300 yards, but I can't see why a broadside into the lungs at that range wouldn't put bullwinkle down. Have fun.
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  #5  
Old 05-03-2007, 01:50 PM
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Thanks for the quick and helpful replies!

I had assumed that with the right bullet and good placement that the 270 would be adequate for moose. From what I understand we are going into Quebec for them but I don`t yet have any more detail. I also have a few other guns including a model 77 MKII in 30-06 and a Herter`s J9 in 300 Win Mag that ought to do the job but I just like my model 700 270 a little bit better than the others. I have made shots over 300 yds on woodchucks with this gun and feel pretty confident using it although my friend who is leading this pack of newbie moose hunters says that we may be faced with a long shot on powerline right-of-ways so he leans heavily toward the 300 Win although he has killed many Ontario moose with a .308.

Given a choice of guns/calibers for moose, what would any of you recommend as an ideal choice?
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  #6  
Old 05-05-2007, 03:52 PM
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I'd use any one of those three, and from what you say, it sounds like maybe you are most comfortable w/ the .270. Use it, and have a great time.
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  #7  
Old 05-07-2007, 06:33 PM
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I would feel very good with my 25-06. I used a 308 when I lived in Alaska. Just use a good bullet.Q
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  #8  
Old 05-12-2007, 01:25 PM
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Nothing can withstand punched out lungs. They all work, but take what you shoot best.
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  #9  
Old 05-16-2007, 02:12 PM
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Not exactly but friends in AK suggest the 165 gr in 30-06-If caribou hunting they use 150s. Soak up lead yes-but bullet in heart/luings and they are dead but it does take them a while to realize it.
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  #10  
Old 05-25-2007, 03:24 PM
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Hey Bud, a very good freind uses a .270 for moose here in NH. He just has to shoot them on land, not swamp. 150's take them easy!
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  #11  
Old 07-11-2007, 09:52 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jpattersonnh
Hey Bud, a very good freind uses a .270 for moose here in NH. He just has to shoot them on land, not swamp. 150's take them easy!
Last year a friend of mines 10 y/o kid got a moose permit and asked me to make him some reloads that would work well in a .308 and I thought it was a bit light because he wanted to use 150 gr bulletsand nothing more. Anyhow I loaded him up some Sierra Game Kings 150 gr. They went up the forks somewhere and his son shot a moose broadside and the moose just went down right there, dead as a doornail.

Any how a .270 can throw a 150gr just as fast as a .308 so I wouldn't see the problem with taking one with well aimed shot placement.

I personally like to use my 300WM.

BTW I use a 140 Barnes Triple Shock in my .270 last year and took a nice doe a 200 yard and the bullet did a phenomenal job. You may want to try one of those. My Ruger M77 liked 58.5 gr of RL19 which is actually .05 gr more than the Barnes manual tells you to load but I tested it all the way up to 60gr without any signs of pressure. I would definitely start out low and work your way up no matter what you end up with. Good Luck
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  #12  
Old 07-12-2007, 08:38 AM
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Thanks driftpin.

As I stated earlier, my friend who will be taking us hunting normally uses a .308 with a light bullet(165 gr.) for his moose harvesting which is done at close ranges, infact he claims that he shot one on the run at about 5 yds. The fact that the moose was running up the small knoll that he was atop and straight at him makes it a more interesting. Dead with one shot though!

I believe that he is planning on using his .270 Weatherby for this hunt so I figured if there is a .277 bullet good enough for his cartridge there must be one for my favorite gun.
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  #13  
Old 07-13-2007, 07:13 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by notso
Thanks driftpin.

As I stated earlier, my friend who will be taking us hunting normally uses a .308 with a light bullet(165 gr.) for his moose harvesting which is done at close ranges, infact he claims that he shot one on the run at about 5 yds. The fact that the moose was running up the small knoll that he was atop and straight at him makes it a more interesting. Dead with one shot though!

I believe that he is planning on using his .270 Weatherby for this hunt so I figured if there is a .277 bullet good enough for his cartridge there must be one for my favorite gun.
Just a note on that I was able to push out a 140gr Barnes TS at .270 Weatherby velocities, which I found out real quick that Weatherby owners will calll you a liar, tell you you're chronograph is off and call you ever name in the book. The only bullet I was able to do it with is the 140 Barnes TS though. Good luck hunting.
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  #14  
Old 12-13-2012, 11:17 PM
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Moose guns.

I realize this is an old thread but with hunting seasons in full swing this topic is still often debated and most often by those that have never shot a moose. Moose are a very big animal but not that tough. There are many that still think an animal the size of a moose needs a powerful cannon to bring it down. There are also some that believe that it takes a .300 Winchester or .338 to kill a small deer. It doesn't. Up until the early 1970's, more moose were taken here in Ontario with the .303 British with iron sights than all other cartridges combined. That is most often a 180 GN soft point bullet at 2400 FPS. Clearly no super duper magnum. Moose are easier to kill than Elk and are most often taken in heavy bush at close ranges or across small lakes. As always shot placement is always much more important than caliber. If you really think you need a big magnum then at least make sure you can shoot it well. .270 Winchester, .308, 3006 are all more than enough to bring down a big moose if you can place your shot in the vitals. If your an experienced woodsman with good stalking or calling skills, a neck or head shot can drop them where they stand with almost any center fire bigger than a .22.
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  #15  
Old 12-14-2012, 09:42 AM
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Way back in 1967 I had the opportunity to moose hunt in Alaska.

I was in a tree where mooses had already been killed from, a couple. I saw/heard the moose coming, about 175 yards. I shot my 30-06 (1903A3) the five rounds and it was still standing. I didnt know if Id hit it or not. I felt quite confident I had. I loaded 2 more and shot them.

My friend was military and we had hunted on/of for the previous 3 weeks. I had heard a lot of stories about fellows shooting moose and that they could soak up lead.

By the time I had shot the 7th round the bull was getting a little shakey, at about 165 yrds. I noticed he went down to his front knees and then all the way down. Probably less than 2 minutes had passed since shot #1 and he had walked 20 yards, at most.

When we gutted him we saw 6 shots in the shest cavity and one pulled back to just about on the diaphram. He was dead from shot #1 (or #2 for sure).

We did find a couple of the 180 gr Winchester silver tips, mushroomed nicely and lots of weight retention. I managed to loose them out of a sweatshirt pocket so I never did get to weigh them.

I had heard the stories and travelled a long ways. Ammo was cheap in comparison.

Moose is excellent eating, does have a distinct aroma when cooking.
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  #16  
Old 12-14-2012, 11:45 AM
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You got the tough old boy. He probably would have died in the next 2 or 3 min from the first shot but given that he didn't or couldn't run and you could shoot again, I would have done the same thing. They are big and it takes a while for the oxegen to run out and the organs to shut down but they do die from any good shot to the vital organs like any other animal. Your 30/06 did the job it was supposed to do. Penetrate and tear up the vital organs. At 160 yards your bullet was still moving at approximately 2400 to 2500 FPS. More than enough to get to the vitals and they did. People in Alaska often carry bigger than needed guns for moose because moose and Grizzlys share the same turf. Grizzlys can also take a long time to go down on a fatal shot and that can be really bad for you if he is charging. Then a cannon seems appropriate for the job.
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  #17  
Old 12-14-2012, 04:11 PM
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Up there there are all kinda of calibers. 30-06 and 300 Win mag were popular then. I wonder about the WSMs now?

Bullets most popular--Caribou 150 gr (in 30 cal) and moose 180s.
Where both may be encountered they seemed to lean to 165s.
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  #18  
Old 12-14-2012, 04:47 PM
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A buddy of mine moved to Alaska a few years back on the Kenai. There are a lot of big coastal bear in that area. He wanted a gun to moose hunt and was happy shooting Model 70 .270 and his Ruger M77 .30-06. But, he felt way under-gunned if he ever had bear problems. He tried a .338 Mag but was struggling with the recoil. I suggested he try a .35 Whelen. He got himself a Remington .35 Whelen and loves it for moose.

Strangely, he did have to put a bear down once, but not while hunting. Some idiot shot one in town (with a hand gun) that was assaulting his garbage. So this wounded female Brown was stumbling around town, all kinds of pissed off as night fell. My friend shot and killed it with the .30-06. It took a bit to die though; after he shot it, it ran out of town into the brush. I think the game warden was a little apprehensive the next morning tracking it into the brush;-) It was dead though.
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  #19  
Old 12-14-2012, 11:22 PM
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Big brown bears can have an unbelievable adrenalin rush when shot. Most drop right away to a good shot from a .30 caliber rifle but a few are like bears from **** that refuse to die. Too many hunters have been killed by bears they shot at short range that were good fatal hits including heart and double lung shots but the bear was still was able to charge and kill the hunter before expiring. In Alaska there are hunters guns like .300 Winchester or .338 and a slew of magnums but the guides often carry bigger .375 H&H or .458, Winchester and the .Rem 416 loaded with heavy bullets. These are stopping rifles used by guides to stop a bear charge at close range where you don't have the luxury of waiting a few min for the bear to die. The bears and moose share the same habitat, often in dense brush and often moose hunters unintentionally surprise a Grizzly at very short distances. They are very territorial creatures and **** hard to stop in the few seconds it takes them to charge you from 30 Yards away in the brush.
The .35 Whelen is an excellent big game cartridge that can push a 200 Gr to a heavy 275 Gr bullet with a lot less recoil than most big .35 calibers. Hard to find ammo in most stores but it is available and easy to hand load from 3006 parent case.
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  #20  
Old 12-15-2012, 01:37 PM
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Outside of dangerous game and even sometimes then. Anyone of those cartridges would kill any of those animals dead if the hunters would do their homework and find out where the vital organs are on the particular animal it is they are hunting and then make a responsible clean killshot. Shooting an animal on a dead run or while its behind heavy brush is something I hear all the time and sometimes it pays off but most of the time they lose the animal by hitting it with a shot that isn't fatal (in which the animal suffers) or it dies and the hunter due to the sun going down loses it to coyotes. If people would just take time to make sure their rifles are sighted in every year and maybe get in some range time halfway in between so when they see a that nice moose or whatever animal it may be, they can deliver to that animal what it deserves, a clean quick humane kill right in its vitals and not just emptying your 7400 into where the brown is or was.

As to a 130gr or a 140gr in a .270 Win, Im not even touching that one. Read Jaack O'conner vs Elmer Keith articles.
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