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  #1  
Old 02-05-2006, 10:40 AM
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How long will an Elk last after processing and packing? How many lbs. of meat do they average? Looking to hunt more frequently so smaller game seems more suitable but I'm trying to get an idea anyhow.
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  #2  
Old 02-05-2006, 02:38 PM
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Cut, wrapped (properly) and frozen elk meat should last at least a year - I've eaten it when almost 2 years old and it was still good. Proper wrapping is the secret - get all air out of the package. The new shrink wrap kits are great.

Amount of elk meat depends on how you process the meat and how large the animal is. A mature bull elk can yield up to 350 lbs of boned out meat if you know what you're doing. Cow elk are about 2/3rds the size of mature bulls, along with raghorn bulls.
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  #3  
Old 02-05-2006, 10:39 PM
bru bru is offline
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Smile 350 lbs of deboned elk

Thanx kdud. 350 lbs sounds like just about a lb a day for a year. I guess thats oneday to think of it. I'm trying to understand the facts in different ways so that my understanding of humans and game might broaden. It seems important to be practical and deliberate. There is no substitute for field experience but your input helps me internalize the responsibilities and good practices that a good hunter employs.
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  #4  
Old 02-06-2006, 07:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdub
Amount of elk meat depends on how you process the meat and how large the animal is. A mature bull elk can yield up to 350 lbs of boned out meat if you know what you're doing. Cow elk are about 2/3rds the size of mature bulls, along with raghorn bulls.
Hmmmm, I think my processor is skimming some winter meat from me, and I always take my quarters in very clean. Maybe if I take them in dirty I'll get more back.
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  #5  
Old 02-07-2006, 01:54 PM
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It's a sure bet if your's is the cleanest and best taken care of carcass, that's the one the processor and help will take their "going home" meat from!
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  #6  
Old 12-03-2010, 03:21 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdub View Post
It's a sure bet if your's is the cleanest and best taken care of carcass, that's the one the processor and help will take their "going home" meat from!
Thats why you shouldnt take anything in if you can help it. One thing to keep in mind when considering how much meat you will get off an elk is, what subspecies of elk it is, whether its a cow or bull, how mature the said cow or bull is.

Your avg rosie mature bull is gonna significantly outweigh its rocky mt. cousin. tule elk are going to be small as well. I believe theres another subspecies about the same size as rocky mt elk, a lot depends on the food source too.
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  #7  
Old 12-04-2010, 06:56 AM
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Vaccuum packers are the one tool I cant live without now for packaging meat. I de-bone all of my animals and do all the cutting of steaks and roasts. But the best part of the vaccuum packers are the fact you can make one very long bag and throw all your meat your going to use for sausage, hamburger, or whatever in one and preserve it for as long as you need. A few years money was tight and getting the meat done up right away wasnt possible. Butchers like it too when you bring in meat like that. Good luck with your elk hunt, stupid work got in my way this year. Oh well lots of good stuff left from last year, thanks to my vaccuum paker hahahahaha
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  #8  
Old 02-04-2011, 05:40 PM
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Care of the meat and processing IS VERY IMPORTANT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I just took a pack of deer meat out to thaw today, from the 2008 season.

The key is clean meat and tight, VERY VERY tight and air free wrapping.

By the way, that meat from 2008 is still in great condition!

Keep em coming!

Crusty Deary Ol'Coot
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  #9  
Old 02-08-2011, 11:11 PM
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The weight that butcher gives back allso varies a lot with the butcher (ethics) and the condition it came in, I would butcher your own if much blood shot or dirt occured. The bucher will not take the time required to save as much of the meat as possible.

Would 350 lb of deboned meat mean allmost 1000lb in live wt?.

Field dressing is somewhere in the 50-60% range - I have little clue about deboned precentages.

Last edited by Kev7griz; 02-08-2011 at 11:21 PM.
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  #10  
Old 02-09-2011, 01:53 PM
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My cow elk have averaged 220lbs-cut and wrapped.Most rag horns will be about the same.
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  #11  
Old 02-09-2011, 01:57 PM
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I bucher my own and seldom measure cut and wrapped weight so thanks.
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  #12  
Old 02-10-2011, 11:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Kev7griz View Post
The weight that butcher gives back allso varies a lot with the butcher (ethics) and the condition it came in, I would butcher your own if much blood shot or dirt occured. The bucher will not take the time required to save as much of the meat as possible.

Would 350 lb of deboned meat mean allmost 1000lb in live wt?.

Field dressing is somewhere in the 50-60% range - I have little clue about deboned precentages.
No offense meant here, but if you're looking at 55% of live weight for field dressed weight, you're taking out a lot more than I am....
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  #13  
Old 02-10-2011, 11:48 AM
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Haven't checked on the final out come with an elk, but I took my once in a life time bull moose in Sept of 1995 here in Ideeeeeeho.

Field dressed, - guts out and legs cut off at the knee joint, the critter went over the scales at about 800lbs.

From that, I had something over 400lbs of bone free meat ready for the freezer.

The shot was an in/out - 30 cal. 200gr Nosler Partition - through the ribs, so meat loss was minimal.

I know that an elk will be less, but just the head/horns and hide of this moose accounted for about 150lbs of the loss.

The live wt. on this critter must have been in the range of 1100 - 1200lbs, so if that is true, the boneless meat came up to a bit over a 3rd of the live wt.

Keep em coming!

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  #14  
Old 02-10-2011, 02:28 PM
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Originally Posted by Tnhunter View Post
No offense meant here, but if you're looking at 55% of live weight for field dressed weight, you're taking out a lot more than I am....
No offense taken.

I was just trying to come up with what size of animal would give 350 lb of meat and my best guess was 1000lb - just a guess.

I have never weighed a game animals live weight or prior to field dressing so it is just a rough estimate based on what people say.
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  #15  
Old 02-10-2011, 03:33 PM
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I weigh 268 and if you boned me out and took all the fat and gristle off, you would have 26 pounds of muscle.....FYI
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  #16  
Old 02-10-2011, 03:58 PM
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I weigh 268 and if you boned me out and took all the fat and gristle off, you would have 26 pounds of muscle.....FYI
Well Like me you might have some good bacon and my estimate you would have at least 70lb of muscle.


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  #17  
Old 02-10-2011, 04:42 PM
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Numbers I'm more used to seeing are 25%-30% of estimated animal live weight is what you'll get back in butchered and packaged meat when taken to a processor. I don't know about most of you, but I've never taken an animal into a processor with guts, hide, and head so 'live weight' (or dead with guts in) has to be an estimation based on....the processed meat you get back! Chicken, or the egg...!

The only time I somewhat paid any attention to what I got back in processed meat weight was when I got an unusually large-bodied muley buck, and an unusually small-bodied spike elk and took them both in to the processor at the same time. I got 100 lbs of packaged meat back from the buck, and 132 lbs back from the elk, weighed on the typical bathroom scale. So, something around 330-400 lbs on the buck, and 400-530 lbs on the elk, live weight. I've never seen a bigger-bodied buck or smaller-bodied elk since. Maybe they mixed some of the meat??! These carcasses were very clean taken in.

I don't agree that you'll likely get a bit more return on meat weight if you do it yourself. I really trim up the meat when I do it myself so I end up with a lot of dog-food scraps. The processor is not going to take that time. Ethics of the processor is another factor, however, and how are we going to know?
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  #18  
Old 02-10-2011, 05:06 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Shawn Crea View Post
Numbers I'm more used to seeing are 25%-30% of estimated animal live weight is what you'll get back in butchered and packaged meat when taken to a processor. I don't know about most of you, but I've never taken an animal into a processor with guts, hide, and head so 'live weight' (or dead with guts in) has to be an estimation based on....the processed meat you get back! Chicken, or the egg...!

The only time I somewhat paid any attention to what I got back in processed meat weight was when I got an unusually large-bodied muley buck, and an unusually small-bodied spike elk and took them both in to the processor at the same time. I got 100 lbs of packaged meat back from the buck, and 132 lbs back from the elk, weighed on the typical bathroom scale. So, something around 330-400 lbs on the buck, and 400-530 lbs on the elk, live weight. I've never seen a bigger-bodied buck or smaller-bodied elk since. Maybe they mixed some of the meat??! These carcasses were very clean taken in.

I don't agree that you'll likely get a bit more return on meat weight if you do it yourself. I really trim up the meat when I do it myself so I end up with a lot of dog-food scraps. The processor is not going to take that time. Ethics of the processor is another factor, however, and how are we going to know?
I agree I was guessing a roughly a 1/3 back from the butcher with 1 being an estimate of live weight.

The 50-60 % was Field Dressed with hide on.
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  #19  
Old 02-10-2011, 05:44 PM
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You can get a pretty good percentage back with pigs. I have weighed a few, both when first picked up in the field with my game hoist. Then again at home when it's all boned out except for the main leg bones.

Can't recall the exact percentages but I think on a pig in good shape you can get close to 40% back from what it was on the hoof.
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