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  #1  
Old 08-25-2008, 09:52 AM
row row is offline
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Loctite and scopes


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I recently purchased a system consisting of:

700 ltr .308
super sniper 10x42
millet windage-adjustable rings
weaver-style single-piece base

Now, I used loctite on the base, but my question is concerning whether I should use loctite on the rings as well. If so, do I use them on the upper/lower screws only, or the windage adjustable screws as well? I don't plan on changing the scope/ring/rifle combination, so I don't mind a semi-permanent setup. I just don't want anything to shoot loose.

Also, how does one go about not scratching the finish on the scope? Or is that not a realistic goal?

Thank you,

Greg
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  #2  
Old 08-25-2008, 10:01 AM
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The 242 threadlocker (blue) is pretty mild and I use it on everything, without hesitation.

If you don't want the rings to mark the scope, lap them a bit to ensure they are lined up and don't have rough edges. Also, don't get carried away torquing them down. If you think that slipping under recoil will be an issue, put something sticky on the inside of the rings. There are a lot of products out there but liquid electrical tape works well (scotchkote is one brand) and it's cheap.
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  #3  
Old 08-26-2008, 08:22 AM
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I normally use clear nail polish on my centre fire rifles that have scopes on them.
I have also used blue locktite and had no problems.
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  #4  
Old 08-27-2008, 11:00 AM
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Don't use any thread locking agent of any kind.
On any scope base or scope ring screws.
There's no reason for it.

Tmon
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  #5  
Old 08-27-2008, 12:45 PM
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I've blue loctited the scope bases on all my rifles for years. I have several sets of the Millet adjustable rings and Haven't used any thread locker on those. Lots of guys just use fingernail polish on the base screws and this seems to work fine also. I sure can't see any downside of putting some thread locking stuff on the scope base screws.

Over the years I ran a gunsmith shop I can't tell you how many rifles came thru with loose bases. A thread locker certainly can help with that problem.
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  #6  
Old 08-27-2008, 01:23 PM
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Blue loctite gets used for base screws on all scope mounts. None for the ring screws.
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  #7  
Old 08-27-2008, 04:42 PM
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An alternative to the blue loctite, at least for the adjustable windage screws, is the green loctite. Green goes on after the screw(s) are in place. That way, you get the windage on the rings set and then can put the loctite on. It's great for carburetor screws, too (if anyone still knows what those are or how they work!).
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  #8  
Old 08-27-2008, 05:17 PM
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If you don't want to leave ring marks on your scopes get get some burris signature zee rings, they have the plastic inserts. I've got 3 pair and I switch scopes a lot and never a ring mark. They cost more but are worth it in my case. I use blue loctite and sometimes nail polish on the bases and rings. What ever you do, do not use the red loctite, if you do a torch will probably be required to get'em loose, you may already know, just thought I'd mention it. Dave
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  #9  
Old 08-27-2008, 07:13 PM
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Not necessary a torch but heat is required. Speaking from experience it is not fun removing other peoples mistakes. Know if I was a gunsmith doing it for a living I believe I would raise my rates on this type of problem to either teach the responsible party a lesson or they would decide to take it some other gunsmith.

The last several used firearms I purchased had various mounts for scopes attached. After getting them home and attempting to remove the bases discovered why they were included. A T/C barrel was the latest installment of insanity when the idot prior owner used Locktite Stud and Bearing Mount #640 on the base screws.

After much head scratching and serious though figured out a way of removing the offending screws without damaging the barrel. No, I won't tell how to do it either as its a trade secret and propietary information. You'll just have to figure it out yourself.
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  #10  
Old 08-28-2008, 07:36 AM
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Yes, don't use the red stuff if you want it to come back apart without heat. However, to confuse the issue a bit, there is or at least used to be a 271 grade which was also red, but not permanent.

The green is 'wicking' grade and yes it can be used after the screws are in place.

If you can't get one out, heat up the screw head with the tip of a soldering iron till you smell the threadlocker. That usually works.
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  #11  
Old 08-28-2008, 05:12 PM
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Yes, do be careful with the loctite that requires high heat to disassemble (there used to be more than one item number that required heat?). When properly applied, you will have to heat the metal to bright cherry red in order to disassemble the parts if you use that type. Ask me how I know...
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  #12  
Old 08-28-2008, 05:56 PM
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What most don't understand about Locktite is that two things are required for it too work. There must be an absence of air and the iron molecule must be present. This means that using alumnium bases and then applying locktite between the base and receiver does nothing. It will set up because of the steel receiver but will not adhere to the alumnium base. Same goes for brass and any other metal but iron. Steel is iron with a higher carbon content basically. I have some 222. 242 and 640 that is close to twenty years old. The original plastic bottles would breathe--they were not air tight. After that period of time some has finally seeped through the bottles but when applied and used as directed still work like the day they were bought. Stuff is truely an amazing product when used correctly and in the right applications. I never saw the needed use on any of my firearms.
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  #13  
Old 08-28-2008, 06:27 PM
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I've never heard the iron thing before; how interesting. Dimethacrylate esters are used in things like tooth fillings, and will also lock things like titanium alloys (various loctite formulations are specifically made for 'inactive' materials), so perhaps some formulations need iron, and others don't?

In any event, the loctite's (supposed to be) bonding the screws, not the bases. So, if there's a question about whether the Loctite you have will work on non-ferrous material, you can just try to make sure you have iron in the screws and it'll work fine.
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  #14  
Old 08-29-2008, 07:42 AM
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I think it's just basically glue, that takes up the space. At least that's my understanding.

It doesn't have to bond perfectly to help - as long as it increases the friction needed to remove the fastener, that is going to help. You are supposed to degrease for maximum effectiveness, but it seems to help a little even if you don't.

As an aside, just took out some differential cover bolts. They had been put on with the silicon running into the bolt holes and it definitely made them harder to get out.

If someone has the technical explanation from a thread-locker manufacturer, that would be great. I'm sure it's on the internet somewhere.

FYI most epoxies and glues will break down with heat.
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  #15  
Old 08-30-2008, 01:34 PM
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I used to work in manufacturing and we used many locktite products--mainly glues. We were always dealing with the engineers and techs from Locktite Corporation. Out of curiosity one day I asked them how the threadlock products worked. That's the core of the information relayed to me. From personal use, observation and experience I have no reason to disbelieve or find suspect that information.
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  #16  
Old 08-30-2008, 08:24 PM
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Fascinating - thanks for attributing the source.
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  #17  
Old 08-30-2008, 08:38 PM
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They're (LocTite) VERY specific any more!
http://www.henkelna.com/cps/rde/xchg...and=0000000389
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