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  #1  
Old 08-11-2012, 08:12 PM
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New to scopes with windage/elevation knobs


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I just received my first scope, Bushnell Elite 3200 10x40 mildot, with windage/elevation knobs. I have read through the manual but it doesn't explain where the knobs should be set when zeroing the scope. Should the knobs be turned all the way down to the bottom, so you have the maximum amount of turns for elevation? Or should the be in the middle, so you have flexibility in going up and down in elevation? I figure if you zero at 100 you probably don't need much reduction in elevation. Maybe it just depends what your zero is. Any information is appreciated
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  #2  
Old 08-11-2012, 08:46 PM
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There should be some set screws that hold the adjustment knobs tight to their shaft.

Sight-in as you normally would. When done, loosen the set screws and rotate the knobs till hash marks align on both the scope and the knob. Tighten the set screws.

The hash marks will be your return-to-zero after you make shooting adjustments for either elevation or windage.
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Old 08-11-2012, 09:03 PM
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If you haven't messed with the knobs from their factory setting in the box, then it's pretty easy. If you've fiddled with them, it's another proposition.

Everyone wants to initially zero at 100 yds - wrong! You should start at 25 yds to zero, then move out to 100.

If you haven't played with the knobs, they should be somewhere near midrange in both vertical and horizontal. Mount the scope in the rings with the rings tightened just enough to apply some friction on the scope body, but still able to rotate and slide back and forth. Adjust the scope to the eye so that you have a full scope picture when looking through it while shouldered, not just a small field of focus in the middle of the glass. This is the distance you want to set it. Now, turn the scope so that the elevation knob is leveled and the crosshairs are both straight up vertical and level horizontally. Tighten the scope rings.

If a bolt action or single shot, remove the bolt or open the breech, secure the rifle with a rifle vise or sandbags (even a cardboard box with "V" notches cut into the top to cradle the rifle will work) securely so that the rifle doesn't move around. Line the bore up on an object such as a mail box, etc., that can be seen through the bore with some light all the way around the object. Without moving the rifle, look through the scope and align the crosshairs centered on the object. May have to do this several times if the rifle gets nudged a bit between alignments.

Once you're satisfied you've adjusted the center of the bore and matching crosshairs, set a target at 25 yds and adjust the shots until you can group at least 3 consistent shots dead center on the target. Moving the target out to 100 yds should put the group somewhere about 2" - 3" high at 12 O'clock on the target. Now, adjust the group to whatever height above dead center you desire.

All this is anticipating you're shooting a modern centerfire rifle and using factory ammo or equivalent.
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  #4  
Old 08-14-2012, 05:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cvc944 View Post
I only buy good glass, and I buy it new or used. Either way, the first thing I do is center my cross-hairs in the middle of the scope using a mirror. Lay the mirror flat on a table, put the scope objective lens down on the mirror, look into the scope, make the adjustments. The mounts I use have adjustments for windage and I use them to center the scope left-right with a collimator. Elevation is what it needs to be. The idea is to keep your reticle adjusted as close to center as possible as earlier mentioned.
I think I know what your saying but why not just turn it all the way one way then count the total clicks divide by 2 turn back that much? Or better yet just mount the dang thing then use kdubs redneck boresighting method, which is what I do.
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Old 08-15-2012, 01:30 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kdub View Post
If you haven't messed with the knobs from their factory setting in the box, then it's pretty easy. If you've fiddled with them, it's another proposition.

Everyone wants to initially zero at 100 yds - wrong! You should start at 25 yds to zero, then move out to 100.

If you haven't played with the knobs, they should be somewhere near midrange in both vertical and horizontal. Mount the scope in the rings with the rings tightened just enough to apply some friction on the scope body, but still able to rotate and slide back and forth. Adjust the scope to the eye so that you have a full scope picture when looking through it while shouldered, not just a small field of focus in the middle of the glass. This is the distance you want to set it. Now, turn the scope so that the elevation knob is leveled and the crosshairs are both straight up vertical and level horizontally. Tighten the scope rings.

If a bolt action or single shot, remove the bolt or open the breech, secure the rifle with a rifle vise or sandbags (even a cardboard box with "V" notches cut into the top to cradle the rifle will work) securely so that the rifle doesn't move around. Line the bore up on an object such as a mail box, etc., that can be seen through the bore with some light all the way around the object. Without moving the rifle, look through the scope and align the crosshairs centered on the object. May have to do this several times if the rifle gets nudged a bit between alignments.

Once you're satisfied you've adjusted the center of the bore and matching crosshairs, set a target at 25 yds and adjust the shots until you can group at least 3 consistent shots dead center on the target. Moving the target out to 100 yds should put the group somewhere about 2" - 3" high at 12 O'clock on the target. Now, adjust the group to whatever height above dead center you desire.

All this is anticipating you're shooting a modern centerfire rifle and using factory ammo or equivalent.

Good information. Using Kdub's procedure I can usually sight in a rifle with 3 rounds. Can't tell how much ammo I wasted in the past trying to start at 100 yards.
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  #6  
Old 08-15-2012, 11:23 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cvc944 View Post
Both methods will work. Since there is always more than one way to skin a cat, you can choose the method of your choice. The mirror is my choice because I can see the reticle is centered rather than trying to remember the clicks I have counted. Collimating works best for me because I'm not the best bore-sighter this world has ever seen.
Gott ya. Different strokes for different folks. Everyone marches to the beat of a different drummer. I've never had the windage mounts so i guess I never even gave it a second thought. We learn something every day. Thanks for sharing.
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