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  #1  
Old 09-05-2004, 10:40 PM
SFT SFT is offline
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Question .35 Rem or .35 Whelen pump gun? Which would you choose?


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Model 7600™ (.35 Calibers) Perhaps one of the best kept deer hunting secrets, .35 caliber cartridges have been taking deer (and lots of them) for almost 100 years. As a special production run for 2004, we've re-introduced two of the most revered .35's, the 35 Remington and the 35 Whelen, in our best, close-quarters deer gun—the Model 7600.
Each rifle sports a non-embellished receiver and barrel with blued finish, and an American walnut stock and fore-end with satin finish. And of course, these rifles include the same features as all Model 7600 rifles so that you can be certain that you'll have the dependability, durability, and accuracy you need in the field.
These rare Model 7600 rifles will only be available in limited quantities. Have your local dealer contact Grice Wholesale for ordering details.
MODEL 7600™CaliberBarrel LengthRate of TwistOverall LengthAvg. Wt.
(lbs.)Order No.MSRP*35 Remington18 1/2"16"39 1/8"7 1/426490$58835 Whelen22"16"42 5/8"7 1/224665$588LOP: 13 3/8"; Drop at Comb: 1 3/16"; Drop at Heel: 2 1/4"
*NOTE: U.S. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual price may vary.
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  #2  
Old 09-06-2004, 11:14 AM
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Have to go with the whelen on that one all the way. Load down to 35 rem performance, load up to top whelen performance you have a gun capable of taking any north american game out to 300 yards easily. I use a whelen for my general purpose big game rifle, hard hitting, soft on the shoulder, and very versitile.
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  #3  
Old 09-06-2004, 01:20 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Thebear_78
Have to go with the whelen on that one all the way. Load down to 35 rem performance, load up to top whelen performance you have a gun capable of taking any north american game out to 300 yards easily. I use a whelen for my general purpose big game rifle, hard hitting, soft on the shoulder, and very versitile.
Always easy to make a big case perform like a little case (if that's your goal)...much harder (and dangerous) to try to get a little case to perform like a big one.
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  #4  
Old 09-06-2004, 02:29 PM
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I'd love to have another .35 Remington, but I couldn't afford to get both, and maybe not even one right now, but what are your opinions as to the accuracy and quality of Remington's pump guns? I couldn't find where the gun is drilled and tapped for a scope or not, so what are your thoughts on the type of sights you'd put on it if you where getting one?
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  #5  
Old 09-06-2004, 02:40 PM
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I am not much of a pumpgun guy! However, between the two calibers you listed, I would certainly go with the .35-Whelen and never look back. It has the power on the upper end to do anything you would want in North American hunting, including the big bears really. Especally with the bullets that are offered today buy bullet manufacturers.
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  #6  
Old 09-06-2004, 02:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFT
I'd love to have another .35 Remington, but I couldn't afford to get both, and maybe not even one right now, but what are your opinions as to the accuracy and quality of Remington's pump guns? I couldn't find where the gun is drilled and tapped for a scope or not, so what are your thoughts on the type of sights you'd put on it if you where getting one?
I would NOT put a scope on the rifle right away until I became acustomed to the operation of the gun. I would just use the iron sights until I knew for sure that I was handling it very well, without adding extra weight to the guns balance.

Once you passed that bridge, I would certainly give the Leupold scope, mounts and rings a try. I like the Leupold shotgun scope for such a rifle, in a 2 x 7 x 32mm variable power. It has a very good up close clear range on 2 power and very wide width of view.

It has thick reticules that won't let you get lost in the dark woods or vine tangles of trees etc. It also has lots of eye relief too. I have 2 of these scope on big bore rifles and they haven't failed me as yet over the passed 3 years.
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  #7  
Old 09-06-2004, 02:55 PM
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Drilled and taped...scope mounting not a problem.

Like the pumps better than the semi-autos; seem to give fewer problems and you may as well work the slide while coming down out of recoil, so the speed of accurate fire isn't much different. Personal opinion: the normal pump effort of pushing that fore end foreward while cycling seems to HELP get the gun back on target.

Don't seen any at benchrest competitions, but for any hunting use, they've hade all the accuracy needed. OFten are two-groupers...by the 3rd. shot, they've heated up a bit and tend to walk impact. But for a hunting rifle. it's where the first round lands that counts, not the 5th.

Not my favorite type of action to try warm loads.
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  #8  
Old 09-06-2004, 03:58 PM
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The sad thing is that here we have another limite run Gun that probably never hit the Canadain border.
In Protest, I avoid the builder.
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  #9  
Old 09-06-2004, 06:17 PM
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given the ballistics of the two rounds the 35 whelan wins hands down, but I doubt ballistics is first and fore most in your decision.

I think a person should have a gun capable of 200 yard shooting as this is about the max the average person with a modest amount of practice could expect to shoot and hit a deer sized target. 35 rem is just too marginal at past 150 yards, but if your never going to shoot anything but whitetails at less than 100 yards, why not a 35 Rem? Ammo would be cheaper and easier to find.
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  #10  
Old 09-06-2004, 08:31 PM
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First to Harry Snippe -- don't blame Remington because Grice comissioned this run of 35 Whelen's. No one else has them for sale but Grice.

Original question: 35 Whelen IF you are willing to handload AND IF 30-06-level recoil is comfortable.

I have 35 Rem in Marlin 336 and 35 Whelen in Rem. 700 Classic. As others have said, the Whelen can go either way with handloads but not vice versa for the 35 Rem.

I have taken antelope and mule deer with the 35 Rem. With the Whelen I have collected whitetail, antelope, mountain lion, and spike elk (one each). I like them both but would give up the 35 Rem. in a heartbeat if forced to keep only one.

I am presently tuning up my Whelen (old Weaver K2.5 scoped) for coming elk season. Here is yesterday's load and range data.

Speer 250 gr. Spitzer over 53.0 gr. Re15 in R-P brass with CCI 200 primer and COL 3.33". After adjusting the sights I fired 5-shot group from bench at 100 yds. into 2.172". BUT first four shots went into 1.132"...I flinched...because the recoil is right at my tolerance limit.

Then I fired 2 shots from a field-type sitting position at the 200 yd. gong...two hits. Then I hit the 300 yd. gong from the sit. Like a dummy I couldn't leave well enough alone and fired my last loaded round at 300 yd. gong again...and...missed. Shoulda quit while I was ahead. These gongs are approx. the size of large deer or elk vitals.

This is an off-the-shelf Model 700 Classic except for having the trigger adjusted to a 3 lb. let-off.

No way I could do that with the Marlin/35 Rem.!

'Nuff said. ;-)
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Last edited by naumann; 09-06-2004 at 08:35 PM.
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  #11  
Old 09-06-2004, 08:50 PM
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PS --

About 40 years ago I bought a Rem. 760 pump rifle in 270 Win. for my Dad. It is the only centerfire rifle he has ever owned and he is now 80 years old. That rifle has worn three or four different scopes over the years but has always served well in the field.

When it was new, and I was young, it took a handful of groundhogs at moderate ranges. And through the years Dad has taken a truckload of whitetails along with three antelope. Last November he fired one three-shot group (about 2") and declared Old Betsy "good to go" for another season.

Bottom line: the Rem. pumps have adequate accuracy for hunting, no doubt about that.
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  #12  
Old 09-07-2004, 06:39 AM
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I would like to see Remington offer the 35 whelen and 35 remington in the 7400/7600 rifles instead of going through a whole sale firm that can not export to Canada. Have the same problem with Marlin 94's and Winchester model 92's from Davidsons.
It is like telling a child that the store across the road now has a new soft ice cream machine ,but they can not have one.
So as far as I am concerned I hope the rifles rust on the self.
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  #13  
Old 09-07-2004, 07:06 AM
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Well, I have both. I wanted a 7600 .35 Whelen when they were a standard catalog item back in the late '80s-early '90s but always ended up buying something else. Then they were dropped and became "collectors items". Back in '02 I learned that Grice had a limited run of synthetic stocked 7600s in .35 Rem. in both rifle and carbine versions. I always thought a 7600 carbine in the little .35 would be fabulous and I'm a .35 freak anyhow so I ordered one. I really wanted a wood stocked gun but it wasn't offered. After getting the gun and putting a matte finished Weaver 1-3X on it, I grew to like the synthetic stocks and matte finish after all. The little gun handles like a dream and shoots groups less than 1 1/2". It is a great little brush rifle.
In '03 I learned that Grice was doing a run of the Whelens so naturally I had to have one. I put a Burris 1.5-6X on it and it shoots as good as the .35 Rem. carbine. I missed a huge buck with it the first time I took it in the woods but that was no fault of the rifle! The '03 run of Whelens sold out VERY fast so obviously Grice decided another batch was in order and they now have the wood stocked .35 Rem. carbine I originally wanted. Oh well, the synthetic stocked gun looks "mean" and is a better choice for climbing trees anyway. As fast as Grice moves those Whelens, Big Green should really put them back in the catalog.
BTW, I really like the Remington pumps. I also have a model SIX in 6mm Rem. and it shoots well under an inch. Other than the triggers, I can't find much to complain about with them.
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  #14  
Old 09-07-2004, 10:27 AM
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SFT - Get the 35 Whelen. Very versatile cartridge and will cover anything you want on this continent. I got one when they first came out and now my son uses it and I got a 7600 Synthetic Carbine for myself. Accuracy is as good as any bolt I've ever owned and very reliable rifles even in extreme climates. Scopes are an individual taste but we've been using 2X7 Burris Compacts with good results. Don't have any qualms about a pump action. I wouldn't be surprised that if you start using one, your bolts will stay at home more often.
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  #15  
Old 09-07-2004, 12:15 PM
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I have a 760 in 30-06 and love it. It has a Bushnell Trophy 1.75-4 on it, works fine. As to the 35 whelen, its all been said already, that's my vote.
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  #16  
Old 09-07-2004, 03:49 PM
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Well, Happy I'm sorry your feel that way, so I won't send you one for Christmas, or accidentaly leave mine there when I come up to go hunting with you. Really though, I feel for you buddy, and that's no way to treat your neighbor, but your gun laws (import laws/taxes too!) are so ridiculous it's a wonder you have access to any new firearms.
And I don't have any bolt guns other than a pellet rifle, as I'm a lefty, and special order bolts just add to my misery of poverty hunting. I think I may call Grice and see what the supply left is, as well as see if they have a layaway system. Who knows, maybe my buddy at Walmart can order one ( or a couple) and let me put it on layaway. Christmas presents to myself you know. I'd get the .35 Whelen laminated stock first, then the walnut .35 Remington. Ya gotta dream!
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  #17  
Old 01-29-2005, 06:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SFT
Model 7600™ (.35 Calibers) Perhaps one of the best kept deer hunting secrets, .35 caliber cartridges have been taking deer (and lots of them) for almost 100 years. As a special production run for 2004, we've re-introduced two of the most revered .35's, the 35 Remington and the 35 Whelen, in our best, close-quarters deer gun—the Model 7600.
Each rifle sports a non-embellished receiver and barrel with blued finish, and an American walnut stock and fore-end with satin finish. And of course, these rifles include the same features as all Model 7600 rifles so that you can be certain that you'll have the dependability, durability, and accuracy you need in the field.
These rare Model 7600 rifles will only be available in limited quantities. Have your local dealer contact Grice Wholesale for ordering details.
MODEL 7600™CaliberBarrel LengthRate of TwistOverall LengthAvg. Wt.
(lbs.)Order No.MSRP*35 Remington18 1/2"16"39 1/8"7 1/426490$58835 Whelen22"16"42 5/8"7 1/224665$588LOP: 13 3/8"; Drop at Comb: 1 3/16"; Drop at Heel: 2 1/4"
*NOTE: U.S. Manufacturer's Suggested Retail Price. Actual price may vary.
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SFT,
Hi I would choose the 7600 .35 Whelen for Deer & Bigger Game. Have Rifles in Both Calibers,only the .35
Rem. gun is a 760A (First Model)
Also Have a 700 Classic in .35 Whelen Shot 4 Bucks w/ that,
using a Federal Premium 225 Gr. Trophy Bonded ,Never again on deer though,Maybe on Bear or Bigger!

Whelenizer :
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  #18  
Old 01-30-2005, 12:39 AM
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SFT
You know I have a nice 35 Remington in the box. Another one like the 1954 336 RC would be grand, as I would have the wife covered .Ever one seems to want to borrow that rifle during the hunting season

Other than that I think I got things covered with a 358 then up to the 3006.
If I were to hunt game that would need a bit more horsepower than the '06, maybe then one should look towards a 325WSM , and be in the 338 winchester class.
The biggest animal I will probably hunt other than moose would be a 400+ bear.
So if you came to hunt maybe a 35 whelen would be the gun to bring on a moose or bear hunt . As for deer , I might lend you my 35 Marlin. We would just have to see.

Last edited by Harry Snippe; 01-30-2005 at 12:42 AM.
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  #19  
Old 01-30-2005, 04:51 AM
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I missed this topic when it first appear... bad time in my life... but I will be the odd ball here. 35 Remington for me. I'm not going to buy one though as I'm too deep into the levers. I bought a Savage Model 170 in 35 Rem and it just about put me over the edge in looking at other pumps! Actually, I guess I'm more of a 35 Rem-nut than pump-nut. I'm presently looking for a Remington 600 in 35 Rem.
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  #20  
Old 01-30-2005, 12:34 PM
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Thanks Harry, I hope someday I'll be able to take you up on that offer, or maybe you can join me here in Texas for a wild hog hunt.
I was looking at Marlin rifles on Gunbroker.com, and found several new and used .35 Rem 336 models, including one older model with ballard type rifling. I also noticed two or three 336 .375 models! Nothing in .356, but I think a .375 would fill the niche beyond the power levels of hot loading my .35 Remington.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Harry Snippe
SFT
You know I have a nice 35 Remington in the box. Another one like the 1954 336 RC would be grand, as I would have the wife covered .Ever one seems to want to borrow that rifle during the hunting season

Other than that I think I got things covered with a 358 then up to the 3006.
If I were to hunt game that would need a bit more horsepower than the '06, maybe then one should look towards a 325WSM , and be in the 338 winchester class.
The biggest animal I will probably hunt other than moose would be a 400+ bear.
So if you came to hunt maybe a 35 whelen would be the gun to bring on a moose or bear hunt . As for deer , I might lend you my 35 Marlin. We would just have to see.
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