» Advanced

Go Back   Shooters Forum > Rifle and Rifle Cartridges > Rifles and Rifle Cartridges
Register FAQ Members List Donate Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 10-12-2004, 08:24 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Waunakee, WI - near Madison
Posts: 296
Firearm wooden stock care/maintenance


Registered Users do not see the above ad.


I was just wondering what methods people use to keep wood rifle or shotgun stocks maintained.

I have always used Hoppe's gun oil and just put a thin coat on after each cleaning. Always seemed to bead up water when rained or snowed on the stock for me so I assumed that this was a decent way of protecting the wood.

I've heard of others using the likes of Pledge furniture polish.

What other "snake oil" treatments are out there? I'm assuming this is on a satin finish and not a high gloss/mirror finished stock.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 10-12-2004, 08:32 PM
mattsbox99's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Havre, Montana
Posts: 6,283
I normally spray them with aerosol RemOil and then give em a good scrubbing with a shop towel. I've been told I have nice wood
__________________
Buy American, it may be your own job you are saving.
UTU, TY&E Service, BNSF
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 10-12-2004, 08:39 PM
MikeG's Avatar
The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Posts: 27,332
Paste wax, if I do anything at all. Same stuff I use for release agent when glass-bedding them, so saves on inventory cost
__________________
MikeG

Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb
Welcome to the forum. Rules are simple, be nice and join in.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 10-12-2004, 08:47 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,595
I wax wood gun stocks.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 10-13-2004, 06:51 AM
FNMAUSER's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Cody, WY
Posts: 170
I use danish oil and rub it in very well with a coat a pasted wax over the top.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 10-14-2004, 08:25 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Waunakee, WI - near Madison
Posts: 296
Mattsbox99.

It's always nice to be told you have nice wood!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 10-15-2004, 09:36 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 783
What you should use really depends on the finish on the wood. The normal varnish finish that is found on most, if not all, factory stocks should require very little in the way of anything to protect the finish. I say that because the finishes are quite thick and usually quite water repellent. If you are using Hoppes gun oil, you are probably doing nothing more than cleaning off the finish and leaving a thin film of oil that appears to make the finish look better.
If the finish is some type of oil finish, using a gun oil could eventually damage the wood. The oil could soak into the fibres of the wood and cause the wood to become soft.
Wax finishes applied to varnish or even some hard oil finishes can help when the finish is scratched or worn.
You also want to make sure the inletting is completely sealed, and that includes under the buttplate. End grain of wood will soak up water very quickly.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 10-16-2004, 07:30 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Waunakee, WI - near Madison
Posts: 296
Quote:
Originally Posted by al_sway
What you should use really depends on the finish on the wood. The normal varnish finish that is found on most, if not all, factory stocks should require very little in the way of anything to protect the finish. I say that because the finishes are quite thick and usually quite water repellent. If you are using Hoppes gun oil, you are probably doing nothing more than cleaning off the finish and leaving a thin film of oil that appears to make the finish look better.
If the finish is some type of oil finish, using a gun oil could eventually damage the wood. The oil could soak into the fibres of the wood and cause the wood to become soft.
Wax finishes applied to varnish or even some hard oil finishes can help when the finish is scratched or worn.
You also want to make sure the inletting is completely sealed, and that includes under the buttplate. End grain of wood will soak up water very quickly.
I don't understand why if a gun is "oil finished" why putting gun oil will do harm to the stock. Is there some place where you can get this same oil finish as say Marlin uses on their new guns?
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 10-16-2004, 08:44 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Posts: 1,595
A real oil finish on a wood stock is done with linseed oil, not the petroleum based oil that is used in firearms lubricants like Hoppe's gun oil.
Petroleum based oils are great for the metal parts, but not really any good for the wood parts.
To give a really stupid example, think what Valvoline would be like to cook with, and olive oil in your car's engine.....yeah, they're both oils, but they have specific uses
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 10-16-2004, 09:41 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Alberta, Canada
Posts: 783
Just an addition to the last post.
Most of the "oil finish" stocks on factory guns is not oil, but a matt varnish type of finish. They are designed to look like an oil finish.
It is unlikely you will find a true oil finish on a modern stock unless you have done it yourself or it is a custom stock and you know the gunsmith used an oil finish. For the do-it-yoursel, an oil finish is most likely based on linseed oil or tung oil. The linseed oil is the foundation for products such as Linspeed.
Most of these oils penetrate into the very top layer of wood, and then harden. It is this hard layer of finish that repels water.
A gun oil is not intended to harden, although it may get gummy with age. Before that, as I mentioned, it will tend to soak into the wood fibre and make the wood flexible, or soft. Definitely not desired.
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 10-18-2004, 02:42 PM
dartonvpr's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Where ever my truck is parked
Posts: 104
Any of the factory stocks that I have not refinished are pretty much left alone, I will wipe the metal down with Remoil, but petroleum based oils will eventually discolor the wood where it comes into contact with it.
All stocks that I finish or refinish get 5-10 coats of tung oil, then hand rubbed Carnuba wax for the final finish. I have tried other waxes, but pure Carnuba wax has given me the best results. Some waxes that say they are pure Carnuba, like turtlewax and mothers, actually have other chemicals, and I try to stay away from anything other than pure.
__________________
JABROWN
By the questions we pose, ourselves we deceive..........
So limited in thought, by what we choose to perceive...
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 10-18-2004, 09:42 PM
mattsbox99's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Havre, Montana
Posts: 6,283
Quote:
Originally Posted by eagleeye
Mattsbox99.

It's always nice to be told you have nice wood!

I was beginning to think you guys were a little dry.


The only wax that is pure carnuba is Meguiars #26. I finish raw wood with any color of Watco finish that looks best, with the Watco part being the most important. I then seal the stock with a nice hard lacquer. After a few weeks, its generally good to go.
__________________
Buy American, it may be your own job you are saving.
UTU, TY&E Service, BNSF

Last edited by mattsbox99; 10-18-2004 at 09:46 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 10-23-2004, 06:32 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Waunakee, WI - near Madison
Posts: 296
Meguiars #26 it is.

Like I said I'm getting a new Marlin and I want to keep it nice for my kids someday. In say 50 years or when I become too old, whichever comes first.

Have you ever heard of anyone using Pledge spray furniture polish? Seems to me putting on this with its lemon scent may not be the most desireable from a hunting scent perspective.

Then again furniture is finished in polyurethane varnishes probably like the new Marlin stock. So maybe what's good for the goose (my end tables) is good for the gander (my rifle).
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 10-23-2004, 07:15 PM
mattsbox99's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Havre, Montana
Posts: 6,283
I wouldn't use lemon scented...

Just wiping it down with a good gun and scrubbing it with a nice high quality paper towel to get the dirt out is the best way to go.
__________________
Buy American, it may be your own job you are saving.
UTU, TY&E Service, BNSF
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 10-24-2004, 05:21 AM
m141a's Avatar
Nawth East Moderatah
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: Madison, NH.
Posts: 5,408
I sort of have a side business/hobby of refinishing stocks and grips, and have done several for MikeG, the moderator here...[one of my best customers... ]
I use a tung oil to seal the wood, whether satin or high gloss, only after the wood has been stripped of all of the old finish.
Tung will harden and seal the pores/grain of the stock....my experience has been that linseed, although good, will always weep out of the wood over time.

Once the tung oil is cured, I use a four-O steel wool to polish the wood and then seal it all with Minwax furniture wax. I've yet to have a complaint, and the stocks will hold well in weather.

FWIW,

Chris~
__________________
Chris in NH.

"some days, I wish my dogs could talk"
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 10-25-2004, 09:05 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Waunakee, WI - near Madison
Posts: 296
Thanks guys!

I think both the Carnuba wax and the Minwax furniture wax makes sense for my needs.

I think I mentioned I have a brand new gun and stock. So I only want to keep it looking brand new and don't need to do any restoration.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 11-06-2004, 08:48 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Waunakee, WI - near Madison
Posts: 296
I can not seem to find Meguiars #26!

Where do I get this? I did not see this on Meguires web-site. Does this go by another name?

At most stores all I can find is Turtle and Mothers "carnuba car wax". And they do state "blend" . I even saw Johnson floor wax. All it said was "original" but did not say if it was pure carnuba or contains some other blend or chemical.

I assume that Marlin's new stocks are some sort of polyurethane. Will tung oil hurt a polyurethane finish?
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 11-06-2004, 09:21 PM
mattsbox99's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Havre, Montana
Posts: 6,283
You'll need to find an auto parts store. The Meguiars #26 is a line of waxes, polishes, cleaners, and touch ups. Its about $10 a bottle...

If you are just trying to keep it nice you don't need anything more than a little RemOil aresol sprayed onto a shop towel (the blue ones). You can have an over oiled/waxed stock, and it will look really bad... Take it easy, and it will look good.
__________________
Buy American, it may be your own job you are saving.
UTU, TY&E Service, BNSF
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Savage 116 stock Tony Black Gunsmithing 7 02-06-2008 11:13 AM
870 stock bolt changes. Ralph McLaney Shotguns, Shotgunning, and Shotshell Reloading 1 08-09-2004 05:57 PM
bedding a model 70 w/ wooden stock idzombie Gunsmithing 12 03-31-2004 09:29 PM
model 70 stock, removing and reinstalling stock idzombie Rifles and Rifle Cartridges 11 02-09-2004 04:56 AM
Shortening Synthetic Stock lossking Gunsmithing 3 02-08-2004 09:21 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:20 PM.

< Contact Us - Shooters Forum - Archive >

 
 

All Content & Design Copyright © 1999-2002 Beartooth Bullets, All Rights Reserved
View Privacy Policy | Contact Webmaster | Legal Information
Website Design & Development By Exbabylon Internet Solutions
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2