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  #1  
Old 12-10-2003, 10:31 AM
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Savage/Springfield Mod. 840


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Does anyone have any information on the Savage/Springfield model 840 ? What I'm intrested in is its accuracy and any other tidbits you may have on it. I just bought one for $125 in mint condition in .222. Thanks. Also looking for pet loads.
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  #2  
Old 12-10-2003, 10:53 AM
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Do you mean a 340? I had one years ago. Accuracy wasn't bad, but it seemed to throw a flier in every group. I didn't try to sort out the problem, and probably didn't know where to start back then.

Stick to the 50 grain bullets rated for .222 velocities like the Hornady SX, Sierra Blitz and the Speer model (can't recall the name). IMR 4198 or Hodgdon H322 are good powers to start with, but there's half a dozen more good ones.

Bye
Jack
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Old 12-10-2003, 11:03 AM
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Think you do mean 340 and not 840...don't believe there was an 840, but as Savage sold a lot of these rifles under house-brands (Sears/Western Auto/Monky Wards/ets) it could be.

Have played with several and still keep one. The only thing to watch with the .222's is that some of them were made with 1:16 twist barrels...have read about it, didn't believe it, but ran across one (under the Revelation trademark...Wester Auto). Nothing to worry about, even the 1:16 twist will shoot most 50gr. factory loads well, they just won't shoot bullets heavier (longer) than that.

Simple rifles...pretty ugly in many ways...socpe mount is an after thought (but notice B-Square still lists a mount)...one locking lug, but for the rounds chambered that's evidently enough as the rifles don't have problems.
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Always thought the 1:16 twist .222's were either a mistake on Savage's part or an attempt to use up an overstock of 1:16 twist they used on the .22Horent versions...the barrel blanks start out the same, so it's possible it was just a boo-boo...also possible it was done to lower costs for the house-brand rifles.
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Old 12-10-2003, 03:58 PM
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No, the gun is a Savage/Springfield model 840. I thought the same thing before looking at the gun but it is stamped on the barrel. I do think it is the same as the 340 but with different parts, Iíve seen the schematics. Wanted to find out about the guns past and accuracy.
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  #5  
Old 12-11-2003, 03:52 AM
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Savage/Springfield

It is the same rifle. Savage made them under a few names. My wife has a Savage 340 and a Stevens 325, each in .30-30. We just mounted a scope on the Stevens, and it will shoot 1" groups with no problem. They were an inexpensive rifle made in the 50's and 60's, I think. They originaly came in .222, .225, and .30-30. My wife got another fine buck this year with the open sighted Savage.
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  #6  
Old 12-11-2003, 04:39 AM
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Been looking, but still haven't come up with an 840...probably a version of the 340, but haven't found who/why of the 840 designation.

To be sure, lets see if this description fits your rifle. Detachable box magazine, the detaching lever is pretty much a shaped end of a flat spring. Large barrel nut. The single action screw in the back, barrel band screw (and barrel band) at the fore end. "Split top" action (this is where the bolt handle's base runs through a slot on top of the action). Threaed holes along the left side of the action for a scope mount (it's a side mount that curles over to top center).
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Old 12-11-2003, 12:27 PM
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Check this out on the above mentioned gun. Hope the attachment goes through.
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  #8  
Old 12-11-2003, 06:25 PM
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Adding attachments is a mite tricky. Click on "Manage Attachments". Type in the drive, directory and file name in the usual C:/dir/file.ext format or click "Choose" and navigate to the file. Click "Add this file". Be sure it's name appears in the box below. Click on "All done" when you've selected all the files you want to attach. I attached the little fellow below just to be sure I got it right.

From "Bolt Action Rifles" by Frank de Hass

INTRODUCED in 1947, the Savage-Stevens Model 340 became a popular rifle because it was the lowest priced bolt action centerfire repeating rifle available in the United States for quite a long time. It started out as the Stevens M325, but soon afterward it was designated as the Savage. It also underwent many changes and improvements and has been sold under many model designations and trade names. The Savage component parts catalog lists this rifle as having been given the following model designations: Stevens Model 322, and Model 325, Springfield Model 840, Savage Model 340, Model 342 and Model 340 Series B, C, D, and V. It was also marked and sold under the Ward's Western Field trade name, one being the Western Field Model 712. At any rate, all were the same basic turnbolt action.

When last made (this model was discontinued in 1985) it was available in calibers 22 Hornet, 222 Rem., 223 Rem. and 30-30. At one time, it was also made in the 225 Winchester caliber. Depending on caliber and style, barrel lengths are 20", 22" and 24", with the barrel being round and tapered. Open sights on the barrel were always standard and for a long time the receiver was drilled and tapped for a scope mount. The Model 340 features a one-piece stock made of walnut, a detachable single-column magazine, side safety that locks the trigger and bolt, and a barrel band that holds the barrel and forend together. Its action is a rather simple one with only one locking lug up front and the root of the bolt handle serving as the other.

Bye
Jack
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Last edited by Jack Monteith; 12-11-2003 at 06:28 PM.
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  #9  
Old 12-13-2003, 12:12 PM
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Thank you very much this was very helpful.
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  #10  
Old 12-13-2003, 01:21 PM
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Jack:
From measureing four of them, that bolt handle is at best a safety lug, it doesn't make contact. Works fine for the .22horent, .222, .223, and 30-30 it was chambered in, but chambering that 340V for the .225W. was a mistake (and it didn't last on the market for long). IT's not an action for 55K rounds of that head size.

The one 340 I kept (mentioned in earlier post) is a 340V. Everything is fine up to about 40-44K pressure....past that, the action does very odd things to brass and to accuracy. If I run it like a .219Ziper, it lives happy..
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