» Advanced

Go Back   Shooters Forum > Rimfires > Rimfire Ammunition
Register FAQ Members List Donate Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rate Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 05-23-2010, 05:51 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 51
How is rimfire case primer manufactured?


Registered Users do not see the above ad.


I've been wondering for some time, and web searches haven't turned up any answers: Does anyone know how they form a rimfire case around the primer compound?

I just can't think of any way to do that without pressing or stamping -- precisely the sort of thing that should ignite the primer! Forming the rim and then squeezing primer paste in there doesn't seem any safer.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 05-23-2010, 06:03 PM
hailstone's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,405
Formed rimfire case has a drop of liquid priming mixture deposited inside the case at which time the case is spun. Centrifical force moves the liquid priming mixture into the rim where it drys. That's how come your can hit the rim anywhere and it will fire.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 05-24-2010, 09:33 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 51
Very clever. Do you know what solvent they use to liquify the primer compound?
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 05-24-2010, 04:03 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: rural Iowa
Posts: 4,077
It sure would be educational and entertaining to tour a munitions factory on a 22LR production day!

From what I've read, hailstone is correct. The "primer mix" is fairly safe as long as it is "wet". It becomes "sensitive" after it dries(or cures). What the solvents might be, I have no clue? Probably best that I don't know.

I "wonder" how many rounds come off the line per hour?

Cheezywan
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 05-24-2010, 04:15 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Townsend, Mt
Posts: 70
Thats real interesting i've always wondered how they made them.

seems thy could just put a little extra primmer in a 22 and they wouldn't even need any powder i've always wonderd if there are any like this?
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 05-25-2010, 07:39 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Posts: 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by geneus View Post
seems thy could just put a little extra primmer in a 22 and they wouldn't even need any powder i've always wonderd if there are any like this?
Indeed they have: .22 "BB" or "CB" were among the first rimfire cartridges and contained no propellant other than the primer. They are still produced for "gallery" shooting -- indoors they're about as loud as an air rifle.

I have com across boxes of .22LR that were accidentally manufactured without powder. These "squib" loads still generate 200-300fps, though you have to be careful to ensure the bullet makes it out of the barrel each time!

Last edited by dbooksta; 05-26-2010 at 05:31 AM. Reason: Fixed typo MontyF pointed out -- thanks!
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 05-25-2010, 04:07 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 5,856
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbooksta View Post
I have com across boxes of .22LR that were accidentally manufactured without primers. These "squib" loads still generate 200-300fps, though you have to be careful to ensure the bullet makes it out of the barrel each time!
Do you mean without powder?
__________________
Still Learnin' as I go!

NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 05-25-2010, 04:11 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 5,856
I've had numerous cases where a rimfire round wouldn't go off. Turning the case 180 degrees, usually it will fire.

What happened there? Was it just an instance where the firing pin struck the first time there was no primer mix?
__________________
Still Learnin' as I go!

NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 05-26-2010, 03:03 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Michigan
Posts: 721
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbooksta View Post
Very clever. Do you know what solvent they use to liquify the primer compound?
Chances are it is the universal solvent: water.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 05-27-2010, 05:57 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Wadena ,Iowa
Posts: 121
I had some the would not go off and I taken it apart later and the powder that was to set it off was not stuck to the brass. it fell out with the powdert that charged .
__________________
Life Member of the NRA,NTA,DAV,ITA ,also member of FTA,CBA
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 05-27-2010, 02:25 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: MT
Posts: 287
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheezywan View Post
It sure would be educational and entertaining to tour a munitions factory on a 22LR production day!

I "wonder" how many rounds come off the line per hour?

Cheezywan
probably more like how may per second
anyway I'll bet it's a bunch
..
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 05-27-2010, 03:42 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: rural Iowa
Posts: 4,077
Quote:
Originally Posted by twodot View Post
probably more like how may per second
anyway I'll bet it's a bunch
..

Might be a whole bunch of folks operating Lee-Loaders?

I have no idea what that would look like.

Cheezywan
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 05-27-2010, 06:10 PM
hailstone's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,405
I have a book written by an executive in the Olin manufacturing plant explaining every aspect of ammunition manufacture. When I return home from my work site this holiday will look up the name and post it here for anyone interested.

"Ammunition Making" by George E. Frost is a publication of the National Rifle Association of America copyrighted 1990. You would have to check the NRA source to determine if its still in print and available. Mr. Frost worked for nearly six decades in the ammunition business before retiring. He started at Western Cartridge Co of East Alton IL staying for nearly 27 years.

Last edited by hailstone; 06-03-2010 at 02:57 AM. Reason: Added book/author information
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 05-27-2010, 07:45 PM
mattsbox99's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Havre, Montana
Posts: 6,283
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaguarxk120 View Post
Chances are it is the universal solvent: water.

You are exactly right, primers are handled wet, and the solvent used is water. That is precisely why you can douse a box of primers, and they will be fine if you let them dry, and why water isn't a safe muting agent to "kill" primers.

The CCI plant in Lewiston, ID makes about 1 million .22LR cartridges a day, most are destined for the various "bulk" packs. Federal in Anoka, MN makes a little over a million a day, I don't know what Remington's production is, although I'm sure its right around a million a day. All these lines run 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and are completely automated.

Funny thing is that they also make about 1 million primers each every day, most of those are destined for factory loaded ammunition. Remington's plant in Lonoke, Arkansas is the largest in terms of square footage.
__________________
Buy American, it may be your own job you are saving.
UTU, TY&E Service, BNSF
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-10-2010, 08:07 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 7
abes books on internet has the book

Ammunition Making: An insider's story (ISBN: 0935998578 / 0-935998-57-8)
George E Frost
Bookseller: A Castle of Books
(Long Beach, CA, U.S.A.)

Bookseller Rating:

Quantity Available: 1
Book Description: National Rifle Association of America, 1990. Paperback. Book Condition: Used: Good. Crease to the spine. 8.5'' x 11'' (aprox.), Softcover bound book. * * * * * * * * * * {Any images shown next to the listing that have our 'aCastleofBooks' watermark on them are the exact item you will receive, all other images are for reference only. Free delivery confirmation for domestic orders. Books with Author signatures are guaranteed authentic. We understand collectors needs in terms of accurate grading and proper packaging. We stand behind our descriptions 100%. May have small easily erasable pencil markings on first page. All items will be shipped securely to insure that they arrive in exactly the same condition in which they left. Our Packing Slips do not contain any pricing information so you may order items as Gifts or for Dropship without concern. We ship every Monday, Wednesday & Friday morning. All items subject to prior sale. Images available for any item.}. Bookseller Inventory # 010485


$141, why are gun related books so expensive?
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-11-2010, 05:03 PM
hailstone's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: midwest
Posts: 1,405
Guess I better put that book in the safe deposit box. Think I paid something like $12-15 when I bought it about sixteen years ago. Too bad the 401k has increased like that book.
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-14-2010, 10:54 PM
digisol's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Queensland Australia
Posts: 135
I would be interested in watching it made, shooting 22 BR and having to cough up to near $1 per round it might show me what the actual difference is between the stuff that costs $5 per box and the other that cost $50 per box.

Kinda makes c/f rifle more interesting, if not a lot cheaper.

The was a add I saw in a local shooting mag the other month where new unloaded, primed 22 cases were for sale, I would find reloading 22 rounds a new challenge if nothing else, can't find much information on what would be involved in it, powder and charge weights let alone bullets and then puting them all together.

Anyone know what powder they use ?
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-15-2010, 09:12 AM
mattsbox99's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Havre, Montana
Posts: 6,283
Its a fast burning ball powder, most likely not canister grade. The match stuff probably is canister grade due to the consistency required from lot to lot.

Non canister grade powders typically vary greatly from lot to lot.

.22LR bullets are heeled, so they don't get crimped in the cases. Its probably quite difficult to do with typical handloading tools. You would likely need tools specifically designed for .22 LR.

.22 WMR can be loaded with better bullets using .22 Hornet dies, but its not a heeled bullet, nor is it as short as the .22 LR.
__________________
Buy American, it may be your own job you are saving.
UTU, TY&E Service, BNSF
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-21-2010, 04:20 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Montmorency Co, MI
Posts: 1,325
One of the Aquila line has no powder. I dont recall which. Many suggest it for use in 'populated' areas for rodent etc control-low noise.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Clean primer cup every time? ghh3rd Handloading Procedures/Practices 16 01-27-2011 08:27 AM
Primer Pockets: Care & Feeding Bongo Boy Handloading Procedures/Practices 27 03-05-2010 12:03 PM
headspace v's fireforming AaronS Gunsmithing 22 06-02-2009 05:05 PM
Reloading in uncharted territory... DakotaElkSlayer Handloading Procedures/Practices 57 03-28-2009 03:40 AM
.44 Spl primers backing out w. NO powder! Fred Handloading Procedures/Practices 14 10-07-2006 10:50 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 11:00 PM.

< Contact Us - Shooters Forum - Archive >

 
 

All Content & Design Copyright © 1999-2002 Beartooth Bullets, All Rights Reserved
View Privacy Policy | Contact Webmaster | Legal Information
Website Design & Development By Exbabylon Internet Solutions
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2