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  #21  
Old 02-27-2006, 09:13 PM
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Well, your used to it then. Why not get yourself a 10/22 and put a reciever mount sight on it. They make all nice ones for the 10/22. Looks nice mounted too.

I agree with what you said. I have two 10/22's and are much easier to load without looking even in the day when looking up in the tree's for squirrels.
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  #22  
Old 02-27-2006, 09:16 PM
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Heres a nice peep for the 10/22.

http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpag...eitemid=527477
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  #23  
Old 02-27-2006, 09:27 PM
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Originally Posted by Gismo
Well, your used to it then. Why not get yourself a 10/22 and put a reciever mount sight on it. They make all nice ones for the 10/22. Looks nice mounted too.

I agree with what you said. I have two 10/22's and are much easier to load without looking even in the day when looking up in the tree's for squirrels.
Well, this may sound silly, but I've got a young grandson who I've been designated to teach about shooting, gun safety, etc. We will start with a Daisy Red Ryder of my wife's, then it's on to .22, and I want either a slide or lever for this. Yes, a bolt would be good, but I want it for myself too, and I don't want a bolt. But it does sort of rule out a semi-auto, don't you think?

So, there you have it. Slide or lever for me, no semi-autos for him. Oh, and besides that, no scopes for him. And I like plinking with open sights, too, but my trifocals have trouble with stock open sights. Funny the things we do, right? ;-)

eljay
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  #24  
Old 02-27-2006, 09:40 PM
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I like the henrys , but I would'nt look past the Rossi pumps either or even a little Browning Trombone (pump action ) I got a Old Remmington for my lad & we both get a lot of fun just plinking away with the iron sights Browning used to make a lever action .22 as well ,I seem to remember ? I think it came out under the Miruko brand .

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  #25  
Old 02-27-2006, 09:44 PM
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Ok, this does change things. Have you thought about a single shot for your grandson to start with, or would you still rather go the lever action way? Since he will start with the Daisy, then maybe the lever gun would be better. He will be used to working the lever by then.
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  #26  
Old 02-28-2006, 04:42 AM
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Here this should give you the info on the Marlin 56:



Marlin’s Levermatic Rifle Line
Offered Untraditional Design
by John Malloy
Contributing Editor to The New Gun Week

The Marlin LThis specimen is one of the first manufactured—a .22-caliber Model 56 with a 24-inch barrel and serial numbered in the 1,000 range. evermatic was a full-size rifle with a unique short-stroke lever action.
The Marlin Firearms Company has been known since 1881 for their line of traditionally-styled lever-action rifles. All Marlin lever guns made today look very much like the rifles that the company made in its earliest days. They have a certain characteristic look about them. They have outside hammers, finger levers that move about 90 degrees to operate the action, and have tubular magazines.
However, for a relatively short time in the late 1950s and 1960s, Marlin made lever-action rifles that were very different from the traditional pattern. With a speed of operation between the traditional lever action and the semi-automatic, these interesting guns were called the “Levermatic” rifles.
The Levermatic story actually began around 1950 with the Kessler Arms Company of Silver Creek, NY. The Kessler company made inexpensive bolt-action shotguns which were sold under many names. The Kessler guns were available at a time when the post-WWII interest in hunting and shooting had increased the demand for affordable firearms. The Kessler company only remained in business for about three years, but during that time, made over three-quarters of a million shotguns. Toward the end of its existence, the Kessler firm introduced a lever-action shotgun, called the Kessler “Lever-Matic.” The Lever-Matic gun was unique among lever-action firearms in that it required a very short stroke of the lever to operate the action. A mechanism with a special accelerator lever allowed this.
When the company went bankrupt, Numrich Arms Company of West Hurley, NY, bought all the remaining Kessler guns and parts. They had occasion to contact Marlin, and supplied complete guns and parts for study.
Opportunity
From that start, the Marlin Levermatic rifles developed. Marlin saw an opportunity to create a new niche in lever-action rifles—a hammerless short-stroke rifle with a different magazine type. Marlin negotiated a royalty agreement with the original inventors, and Marlin engineers Ewald Nichol and Tom Robinson developed the mechanism for the rifles. The short, smooth action used a cam-and-roller accelerator system that allowed a lever movement of less than 1½ inches. This short movement allowed the shooter’s hand to remain on the grip of the stock, and was much faster than a traditional lever action.
A close-up of the Levermatic action shows that, with the action closed, the rear of the bolt has tipped up to lock into the receiver opening. The action was strong and the rifle had a good reputation for accuracy.
There were five distinct variations of the Marlin Levermatic rifle.
The first Levermatic was the Model 56. Introduced in 1955, it was a .22-caliber rifle with a 7-shot box (“clip”) magazine. The new .22 provided a lower-priced alternative to the traditional Marlin Model 39 lever-action .22 rifle. However, the new Levermatic design had advantages of its own. The Model 56 had a one-piece stock, and was bedded into the stock with two bolts. The system was a good one for accuracy, and the new Marlin 56 quickly developed a reputation for excellent accuracy. It was furnished with traditional open sights, but to bring out the inherent accuracy, the Model 56 was drilled and tapped for both receiver sights and scope mounts.
The action was a strong one, with the rear of the bolt rising up to lock into the receiver opening. The locking system was reminiscent of that of the famed Savage 99. Another feature similar to the Savage was the manual safety, located behind the trigger, on the right side of the lever. Differing notably in its short 25-degree lever throw, the new Marlin seemed to be not only a good rifle in its own right, but perfect as a .22-caliber understudy for the 99.
Changes
Some changes occurred during the production of the Model 56. In 1956, the squared steel receiver was supplanted by a curved aluminum receiver that blended into the lines of the stock. At that time, a Monte Carlo stock became standard. The Model 56 initially came with a 24-inch barrel (which was later reduced to 22 inches), and weighed about 6¼ pounds. Furnished with a seven-shot magazine, the Model 56 could use optional 10-round and 12-round magazines which were also available.
With the action open (yes, that is as far as the short-stroke lever moves), the bolt tips down and moves rearward inside the receiver. The Model 56 had a box (clip) magazine. Other .22-caliber variants had tubular magazines.
The Model 56 performed well, and was a fairly popular rifle. In the period between 1955 and its discontinuance in 1964 a total of 31,523 were made.
In 1959, a special version of the Model 56 was made. Called the Model 56 DL “Clipper King,” the rifle came with a 4-power scope already mounted, and a 12-shot magazine was standard. On the barrel was the three-line legend, “Marlin Clipper King,” and a crown symbol. The buttplate was made of red hard rubber (instead of the standard black buttplate). The 56 DL came in a cardboard gun case, and also included were a tube of Marlin Rustopper grease, a game and target record book, a sighting-in guide, a game map, and 50 targets. Only 152 of the special Clipper King rifles were made. It is a little-known variation that may someday be of interest to collectors.
Nineteen-fifty-nine was a busy time for the Levermatic lineup. In addition to the 56 DL, Marlin also introduced two tubular-magazine short-stroke lever rifles. The Model 57 was chambered for .22 Short, Long or Long Rifle, and the Model 57M was made for the new .22 Winchester Magnum Rimfire (.22WMR) cartridge. After Winchester announced the .22 Magnum cartridge in 1959, Marlin required only a slight redesign of the basic Levermatic mechanism to adapt it to the new rimfire cartridge. Thus, Marlin was able to beat Winchester into production. Winchester did not market a rifle to shoot their new cartridge until 1960.
Tubular Magazines
The Model 57 rifles were introduced with curved aluminum receivers, but in 1960, Marlin reportedly reverted back to the squared steel receivers for the Levermatic rifles. The tubular-magazine variants of the Levermatic were more popular than the original box-magazine version. A total of 34,628 Model 57s (1959-1965) were made, while the even more popular 57M, in .22 Magnum (1959-1969) sold 66,889 rifles.
The basic Levermatic action was a strong one, and in 1963, Marlin decided to bring out a centerfire version of the Levermatic. This became the Marlin Model 62. With the centerfire Model 62, Marlin returned to the use of box magazines. In the first catalog listing, the calibers to be offered were .357 Magnum, .256 Winchester Magnum and .22 Remington Jet. (The .256 and .22 Jet were both necked-down versions of the .357.) Subsequent catalogs listed the .256 and the .22 Jet only.
In fact, though, only the .256 Winchester Magnum version was actually produced, and the Marlin Model 62 was the first rifle ever to be produced in that caliber. In some places, the Model 62 is often listed as having been available in .256 and .22 Jet, but the .22 Jet rifles were never made.
However, in 1966, a new caliber was added to the Levermatic line. The .30 Carbine cartridge had become very popular after World War II, but was available in little else beside surplus M1 Carbines. The .30 Carbine chambering was offered in the Model 62, which gave shooters a choice of a fast-operating, accurate rifle suitable for scope mounting.
The Model 62, in both calibers, was discontinued in 1969. The total production was 15,714 guns. The popularity of the .30 Carbine version is shown in the fact that, although it was introduced three years after the .256, over 50% (7,996) of the Model 62s sold were in the.30 Carbine chambering.
Serial Numbers
An interesting sidelight of the Levermatic story involves serial numbering. Today, we are used to the fact that passage of the Gun Control Act of 1968 required serial numbering of all firearms. However, when the Model 56 was introduced in 1955, federal law required serial numbering only of centerfire rifles, but not of .22 rimfire rifles.
At first, Marlin began numbering the Model 56 .22-caliber rifles, anyway. The company had always applied serial numbers to their Model 39 .22-caliber lever-action rifles, and it seemed natural to continue with the Levermatic. However, a Marlin study showed that it was not really cost-effective to continue the numbering, record-keeping and reporting procedures for the new rifles. By that time, serial numbers had been applied only to the earliest-production Model 56 rifles, and then the practice was discontinued.
As new Levermatic models—the Models 56DL, 57 and 57M—were added to the line, the same tradition of not applying serial numbers was continued. This tradition was continued when the Model 62 Levermatic was introduced. However, the Model 62 was a centerfire rifle. To their embarrassment, after about 4,000 Model 62 rifles had been shipped without serial numbers, Marlin belatedly realized that they had been in violation of the law. A recall program was initiated, and owners could return their rifles for serial numbering. Even at the time of this writing, apparently some of the unnumbered centerfire Levermatics have not been returned. Present owners can still contact Marlin for procedures to have their guns numbered.
The Levermatic rifle is an interesting sidelight in the offerings of the Marlin company. It offered an innovative new action type for a .22 rifle, with a fast action and excellent accuracy. It was in the forefront to offer the .22 Magnum when that cartridge was announced. It was the first rifle ever to chamber the new .256 Winchester Magnum. In a niche of their own, the Levermatic variations were fairly popular, and almost 150,000 were made.
The Marlin Levermatic rifle, in all its different variations, is an interesting gun.

Malloy tries out a Marlin Model 56 Levermatic and
finds it to be a fast-handling rifle with good accuracy.
Reprinted by Permission from The New Gun Week (Thanks to Joe Tartaro and John Krull)
Vol. 40 Issue 1811 - Jan. 1. 2005
Visit Gun Week on the web at www.gunweek.com
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  #27  
Old 02-28-2006, 07:45 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim H
Here this should give you the info on the Marlin 56:

Marlin’s Levermatic Rifle Line
Offered Untraditional Design
by John Malloy
Contributing Editor to The New Gun Week
Wow! Now I know about the Marlin 56. Thanks for that! I wonder how often those show up in gun shops, or at the shows. If I make the big Dallas Arms Collectors show in Dallas next month, I may see one or more. If I'm ever going to see one, I suspect it will be there. In Texas, that's the granddaddy of all gun shows.

I also wonder...are they now considered collector's items, and priced accordingly?

Again, thanks for the info

eljay
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  #28  
Old 02-28-2006, 08:04 AM
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Originally Posted by Gismo
Ok, this does change things. Have you thought about a single shot for your grandson to start with, or would you still rather go the lever action way? Since he will start with the Daisy, then maybe the lever gun would be better. He will be used to working the lever by then.
He will not be going out by himself for quite a while, as I'm a strict and conservative teacher. So, in the interest of conserving storage space and cash, I want to get one rifle, that suits me, and that I can teach him with. I believe that any of the lever actions we're talking about, and probably the Remington pump, can be loaded single shot.

And so, I want to go that way. Hope it's a good decision.

Comments on this thread have convinced me to reconsider my position on the Henrys. The one I like the most (up until now) is the straight .22 lever action, I guess because it has the look of the 94 Winnie, of which I am EXTREMELY fond.

Thanks for your inputs,

eljay
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  #29  
Old 02-28-2006, 02:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by william iorg
The Marlin Model 39 (we have the 39M - straight stock, shorter barrel) and the Remington are readily available new.
Slim,

Can you (or anyone else seeing this) tell me when Marlin stopped making the 39M? This is the Marlin I would want, if I could find one. If I go prowling gun shops/pawn shops/gun shows, I'm wondering how hard a time I'll have finding one.

Thanks for all your help,

eljay
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  #30  
Old 02-28-2006, 03:04 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by eljay
Slim,

Can you (or anyone else seeing this) tell me when Marlin stopped making the 39M? This is the Marlin I would want, if I could find one. If I go prowling gun shops/pawn shops/gun shows, I'm wondering how hard a time I'll have finding one.

Thanks for all your help,

eljay
They stopped making the 39M in 1987.
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  #31  
Old 02-28-2006, 03:17 PM
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I have a remington pump that Dad won somewhere in a raffle. I feel it shoots nice and I plan on getting my wife [city girl] to shoot some more. It's a nice plinking gun. Of course there was an old Winchester bolt w/ 5 round clip & tiny scope in 22 too but I like shooting the pump more.
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  #32  
Old 02-28-2006, 03:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gismo
They stopped making the 39M in 1987.
Thanks. How likely do you think it would be to run across one of them at a gun shop, pawn shop, or gun show?

By the way (off topic!) I had read your thread about ghost ring sights on a Marlin, and wanted to mention to you that today I shot my 94 .44 Mag with the XS Ghost Ring sight installed, with the black plastic temporary front sight, which is used to verify the front sight height before installing it. The bad news is I need a different front sight than the one supplied, the good news is that it'll be shorter than the one supplied, which I like. I'll be swapping it out tomorrow in Fort Worth and then I can see if the wide white stripe on the wide blade is as good as I've heard.

What I wanted to say is, that for me, the ghost ring works just like I'd read. As long as I concentrated on just looking at the front sight and the target, it's very fast and accurate. The only time the group opened up is when I started consciously trying to center the tip of the front sight in the ring, which all advice I've read says will produce bad results.

Just wanted to pass that on to you.

eljay
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  #33  
Old 02-28-2006, 04:05 PM
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Thanks eljay, Will keep all that in mind when my turn comes. Should be real soon.

About the 39M... you just never know what you will find at a shop or a gun show. Last year a local shop had 4 old 39A's and two 39M's. I was going to get one of the 39M's, but forgot all about it until you just asked about it. Now I will be looking again.
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  #34  
Old 02-28-2006, 06:34 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gismo
Thanks eljay, Will keep all that in mind when my turn comes. Should be real soon.

About the 39M... you just never know what you will find at a shop or a gun show. Last year a local shop had 4 old 39A's and two 39M's. I was going to get one of the 39M's, but forgot all about it until you just asked about it. Now I will be looking again.
Okay, good. I think I'm going to do some prowling around. And, make that big show in Dallas next month.

Gismo, I only recently joined this forum, and I've got to say that it is, hands down, far and away the best I have ever seen. EVERYONE on it seems to be a serious gun person, and both sincere and helpful. Very, very refreshing. I'm glad I found it.

eljay
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  #35  
Old 02-28-2006, 06:41 PM
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Gismo, I only recently joined this forum, and I've got to say that it is, hands down, far and away the best I have ever seen. EVERYONE on it seems to be a serious gun person, and both sincere and helpful. Very, very refreshing. I'm glad I found it.

eljay[/QUOTE]


Glad you like it here. We sometimes get into debates about our opinions, but you just have to look at everything everyone tells you and decide for yourself. There are many knowledgable guys here. Like I just read in another post... there will usually be someone in here with an answer to what you are asking. With all these guys.. someone will know.
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  #36  
Old 03-01-2006, 02:53 PM
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eljay,
I just picked up a Henry H001T two days ago and took it to the range yesterday. This model is just like the Golden Boy, but doesn't have the brasslite receiver. Let me assure you that there isn't any plastic whatsoever on, or in, my rifle.

If you have handled a Henry, you already know it has the smoothest action on the market. What suprised me was the trigger....light and crisp with no creep. Best factory trigger I have ever squeezed. Finally, this thing is a real shooter!

JIm
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  #37  
Old 03-01-2006, 03:46 PM
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Originally Posted by DakotaElkSlayer
eljay,
I just picked up a Henry H001T two days ago and took it to the range yesterday. This model is just like the Golden Boy, but doesn't have the brasslite receiver. Let me assure you that there isn't any plastic whatsoever on, or in, my rifle.

If you have handled a Henry, you already know it has the smoothest action on the market. What suprised me was the trigger....light and crisp with no creep. Best factory trigger I have ever squeezed. Finally, this thing is a real shooter!

JIm

The H001T is the same model I have. Great shootin rifle.
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  #38  
Old 03-01-2006, 07:29 PM
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Originally Posted by DakotaElkSlayer
eljay,
I just picked up a Henry H001T two days ago and took it to the range yesterday. This model is just like the Golden Boy, but doesn't have the brasslite receiver. Let me assure you that there isn't any plastic whatsoever on, or in, my rifle.

If you have handled a Henry, you already know it has the smoothest action on the market. What suprised me was the trigger....light and crisp with no creep. Best factory trigger I have ever squeezed. Finally, this thing is a real shooter!

JIm
JIm,

Thanks for that input, and glad to hear you like the rifle. It's always rewarding when you buy a gun, and then find you like it as much as you thought you would.

I want to preface what I'm about to say by saying that I've never owned a Henry, only handled a lever and a pump in a store, and that's all the first hand knowledge I have. And it's true that those guns felt good to me.

That said, here's what I get if I try and summarize everything that I've been told by others about Henrys in addition to my reaction to the ones I handled.

1. I have never heard or read a single bad word about Henrys from people who own them. Every owner that I've heard from likes their Henrys.

2. Some dealers like them, some say they're "mediocre at best" (here quoting a dealer I've been buying guns from for about 25 years).

3. Most gunsmiths I've had occasion to talk to don't like them (This could well be an emotional response, I'll agree).

4. The lever action I handled was as smooth as a 9422 (the gold standard, in my opinion), but not smoother.

5. The trigger pull on the gun I handled was, perhaps, the best stock pull I've encountered. The 9422M in my family is equal, but out of the box had a lot of creep, for which I had to design a fix that would not create the possibility of the half cock notch catching the hammer on its way down, by adding metal rather than removing it.

So that's a summary of all the information I've gathered to date about Henrys. Surprising, and somewhat perplexing to me is that, if I search the forums, I can find more people unhappy with their 9422s than with their Henrys. And our 9422M, right now the sweetest .22 lever I've ever handled, took some serious work to get it that way, and I'm not talking about buying and installing a hammer and sear from Volquartson, either.

Also, today I had the opportunity to handle a couple of Marlin Golden 39s. I was really ready to like this gun, had never handled one. And I know that's a small data sample but, well, I guess our 9422M has me spoiled. On both of these Marlins the trigger would definitely have to have work, and the action was not as smooth as the 9422M (I should add, the action has been good on every 9422 and 9422M I've ever handled but on the newer ones, the trigger creep HAS TO BE FIXED).

I think what it is, I like 94s and 9422s. I like blued steel guns with Walnut stocks. But the engineer in me knows that good things can be done with aluminum, and bad things can be done with steel. And there are other woods out there as good as Walnut.

And I said, back when I started this thread, that I was looking for a plinker. Not a hunter, not a target shooter, and definitely not a collector's item. So, what am I gonna do?

Well, I'm going to sleep on it, but right now I seem to be pointing towards either a Remington Model 572 Fieldmaster Pump, or a Henry Lever Action, the standard model.

Strange, huh? Both have Walnut stocks (I think), but both have aluminum receivers, and probably triggers, and I don't know what else.

Oh and by the way...If there's anyone out there who owns, or has owned, a Henry, and is or was dissatisfied with it, JUMP UP AND TELL ME ABOUT IT! I cannot think of any gun I've been involved with that NOBODY was dissatisfied with, not even the S&W 27s and 29s and Colt Pythons that I used to use and work on.

Sorry, I didn't mean to carry on so, and I do appreciate all the inputs.

eljay
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  #39  
Old 03-01-2006, 08:26 PM
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quote:
Strange, huh? Both have Walnut stocks (I think), but both have aluminum receivers, and probably triggers, and I don't know what else...



eljay,
The trigger in the Henry is steel. The Henry also does have a walnut stock. Sometimes you run into one with what looks like AA or AAA fancy walnut on them. Saw one at wal-mart a few months ago that had curl all in the stock. Nothing bad to say about them here.

I do agree that the older 94's were really good, but in the past few years, wood fit and finish was not the best.
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  #40  
Old 03-01-2006, 08:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gismo
quote:
Strange, huh? Both have Walnut stocks (I think), but both have aluminum receivers, and probably triggers, and I don't know what else...



eljay,
The trigger in the Henry is steel. The Henry also does have a walnut stock. Sometimes you run into one with what looks like AA or AAA fancy walnut on them. Saw one at wal-mart a few months ago that had curl all in the stock. Nothing bad to say about them here.

I do agree that the older 94's were really good, but in the past few years, wood fit and finish was not the best.
Gismo, you're getting me closer and closer to going out for the Henry! The 9422M came into the family the last year they made them and, as it turned out, the 94 .44 Mag the same way. I guess that's enough "heritage" for one family. I was not intending to knock the Henry in my last post, I was just trying to summarize what I'd learned, or been told. And again, I appreciate you're input.

I'm going to make two gun shows this month, a small country one, and a very, very big one in Dallas. That is, unless I walk into a shop, pick up a Henry, and like it so much I walk out with it. And that might happen. I've not done well buying guns at gun shows.

eljay
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