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  #1  
Old 05-25-2011, 11:42 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Portland, Tx.
Posts: 34
1885 trigger upgrade


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Anyone heard any new news on options to lighten the trigger on my 1885 Winchester high wall by miroku. I've heard of two kits but they didn't seem safe or practical. I love my gun and don't really want to change the outward appearance of the rifle.
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  #2  
Old 05-26-2011, 05:41 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 97
I have an 1885 Browning also made in Japan that I have been shooting for almost 20 years. I have not had any complaints with the trigger, It was used by my godson acouple of years ago harvesting a buffalo.

Are you feeling creep or grit ? Or is yours exceptionally heavy reull weight.

Ae you having trouble with groups or some other issue with shooting performance?

I am not aware of any aftermarket trigger available.

MJ
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  #3  
Old 05-26-2011, 04:53 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Portland, Tx.
Posts: 34
Sorry for lack of description but the trigger is good and the creep almost nonexistent. I've adjusted it as light as I can and guess it to be around 2.5- 3 pounds. I can drive tacks at 100 yards but at two one usually spreads out a bit and Im fairly certain it's me not gun. The 28" barrel has a 1:14 twist and I upped the grain to help and it did but I still get flyers and usually on the third or fourth shot. I know practice will help but I can't afford tons of ammo as I don't reload yet.
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  #4  
Old 05-26-2011, 06:24 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 97
What caliber is your 1885.

A 2 to 3 pound trigger with a crisp break and no creep is a pretty d*** fine trigger by anyone's standards. It is also a safe trigger.

Unless this is a benchrest gun only I would suggest against changes.

If you hunt with it I would definitely advise against changes.

When you say "drive tacks" at 100 yards what are you talking about as far as a 3 or 5 shot groups size center to center?

If it is in the 1 to 2 inch area you have a fine shooter.

If it is less than that it's a great shooter and the trigger pull is the same whether the target is at 100 / 200 or 1000, so that kind of rules out a trigger issue.

Iron sights or scope?

Also think about the fact that this has a two piece stock which will also limit the achievable repeatability.

A 1 inch group at 100 yards with any rifle is unlikely to repeat that at 200 / 300 / etc. If the spread is 1 inch at 100 the spread is going to continue to expand down range.

If your 1885 is in a caliber with any amount of recoil you may want to have a good coach watch you shoot. Perhaps even loading [or not] your rifle without your knowledge and observing if there is a flinch factor. [ everybody does to one degree or another ]

I don't think the trigger, as you describe it, has any bearing one way or the other on the accuracy of your rifle.

I understand the cost of ammo problem but the sad truth is that almost any rifle will out shoot the shooter who doesn't put rounds downrange on a regular basis.

Tell you what I do is shoot A LOT of rimfire carefully and thoughtfully to get in the right habits and muscle memory at low cost. An then I spend the time and money to shoot my center fires as much as I can afford to [ time & money] with the same thoughtfulness and care. I've done that for a lot of years and everyone of my rifles [and pistols] are capable of much more accuracy than I am.

Then again if it's perfect and easy... how much fun is that?? [boring!!!]

There ain't no magic, and these machine don't shoot themselves, and we are definitely the weakest link.... That's why it is so doggone much fun.

My opinions only, and in reality I know about " two fifths of F***all" about anything.

Have fun

MJ
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  #5  
Old 05-26-2011, 06:30 PM
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 97
Also on those long groups : Let your barrel cool completely between each round 10 to 15 minutes in the shade if necessary and see if that makes any difference. On these 1885 and Ruger #1s for that matter, where the pressure on the forearm [on your rest] can be critical. Mark you forearm with some masking tape where it is firmly mounted and make sure it is always on the rest at that position for each shot.

Barrel heat and forearm pressure changes could be a culprit.

MJ
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  #6  
Old 05-26-2011, 10:57 PM
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Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Portland, Tx.
Posts: 34
I definitely agree with y'all about the flinch as I try to surprise myself as squeezing the trigger to break it over. As far as the two piece stock I'm not sure I understand as the barrel is floated, checked with a dollar bill and no clearance problems, and I'm carefull to maintain consistent position on the rest. I will definitely heed your advice and break out the 22 lr and spend some quality time practicing technique to remedy the flinch reflex. Ohh by the way it's a 22-250 and on a calm day I can usually cover 3 shot groups with a dime. Once thanks again for the advice.
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  #7  
Old 05-27-2011, 05:31 AM
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Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 97
Okay 22-250, so the flinch from recoil is probably less of an issue.

If you can consistently shoot 1/2" groups at 100 yards then you and your rifle are doing well.

Mines a 45-70 so that's close to my 1 shot group.

The rigidity of a 1 piece stock [ie- bolt action] vs two piece will almost always produce more inherent repeatable "accuracy" all else being equal. I;m not an engineer or a physicist so don't know if I can explain it in detail but there it is. Even with a free floated barrel there is still an issue with the rigidity of butt stock / action / barrel base.

If I could diagnose flyers with precision I'd be retired and rich.

I'll go back and repeat that if you can shoot those groups at 100 with that trigger, than you probably are not having problems with the same trigger at 200. And if you hunt with the gun I think the one you have is effective and SAFE.

Barrel Heat? Wind ? Human oops? Anticipatory flinch, Gremlins ? you got me.

Good luck and happy shooting

MJ
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