» Advanced

Go Back   Shooters Forum > Rifle and Rifle Cartridges > Wildcat Cartridges
Register FAQ Members List Donate Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read



Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Rating: Thread Rating: 7 votes, 4.43 average. Display Modes
  #1  
Old 06-06-2008, 07:24 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
6.5 stw


Registered Users do not see the above ad.


any info for the 6.5 stw?
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 06-07-2008, 05:29 AM
faucettb's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Peck, Idaho
Posts: 12,620
I wouldn't expect great barrel life. I've been putting together rifles for near 50 years now and even guys running the 264 Win mag hot are not getting long barrel life from it. If your looking for a long range target rifle the 6.5 by 284 will do a better job. If your looking for a long range big game rifle I'd step up to the 300 Ultra-mag.

My 2 cents.
__________________
Bob from Idaho
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 06-07-2008, 08:35 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Kodiak,Ak
Posts: 36
6.5 Stw

I am with Bob on this one. Not sure about the request unless one is looking for an ultra velocity 6.5. With that said one needs only to look at the published velocities and compare the 270 Win and the Weatherby version. The Weatherby with a lot more case capacity had to have a generous freebore to reduce the pressures and its still not much more velocity than the Winchester. 6.5WSM for a rimless efficient cartridge or the 264 Win Mag with high quality stainless barrels for a long life of "hunting".

Just some thoughts

Neal
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 06-07-2008, 09:49 AM
faucettb's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Peck, Idaho
Posts: 12,620
When 338CE talks about a long life for hunting he means a rifle that isn't shot a lot. Most hunters may not shoot more than 20 to 40 rounds a year and at the outside no more than a hundred. At this rate even guns noted for short barrel life can last a long time.

When Roy Weatherby first came out with his 300 Weatherby magnum with the generous freebore some folks experienced excessive barrel wear once past the 300 round mark and excessive throat degradation after 500 rounds if shooting bullets in the 150 grain range at the highest velocities they could push them. But that was a lot of rounds downrange for a big game hunting rifle and could give many many years of service to a careful hunter.

Folks that target shoot and put lots of rounds downrange simply find these super high performance rounds such as the 6.5 STW and 6.5 Ultra-mag uneconomical because of the high barrel wear and costs associated with changing out barrels often.

One way around the barrel change cost is to use the Savage bolt gun platform. It takes about 15 minutes in your workshop and nothing more than a Barrel nut wrench, barrel vice and a go headspace gauge for the caliber of your new barrel to change out a Savage 110 barrel.
__________________
Bob from Idaho
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 06-07-2008, 07:27 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
its says directly in shooting times that u can expect 2000 plus rounds with a good quality barrel.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 06-07-2008, 07:39 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Oklahoma
Posts: 821
I have't been building rifles quite as long as what Bob has but, I will agree with him and say that barrel life will be short with a cartridge like the 6.5-STW...

Yeah, you can shoot 2,000 rounds through a 6.5-STW but, what kind of accuracy are you going to get? For me personally, when a rifle starts shooting 1-inch groups at 200 yards, it's time for a new barrel. I can tell you for a fact that regardless of what Shooting Times says, if you load a 6.5-STW to it's full potential, you will NOT see 2,000 rounds through the best barrel out there! Load id down to or below 264 Winchester velocities and then you might see 2,000 rounds but if you are going to do that, then go to a smaller and more effecient cartridge like the 2.6-284 or 260 Improved....

A
__________________
By HIS stripes, we are healed...
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 06-07-2008, 08:16 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
heres my plans:
shoot 120-160gr bullets and using the rifle as a light mountain rifle. i do have a friend who has one and has put near 500 rds thru it and still shoots 1/4" groups at 100yds. my intent is to shoot it roughly 100 times a year
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 06-07-2008, 08:17 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
aslo, the other reason is for a switch-barrel rifle. this will include the 6.5 stw, .257 stw, 7mm stw, and .358 sta.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 06-07-2008, 08:42 PM
faucettb's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Peck, Idaho
Posts: 12,620
Quote:
Originally Posted by countryboy View Post
heres my plans:
shoot 120-160gr bullets and using the rifle as a light mountain rifle. i do have a friend who has one and has put near 500 rds thru it and still shoots 1/4" groups at 100yds. my intent is to shoot it roughly 100 times a year
That's pretty good shooting. I spent a lot of years competing in bench rest competition with a 222 heavy bench gun. It averaged .35 groups at a hundred and .75 groups at 200. Your friend ought to get that 6.5. STW into bench rest competition, he'd clean up.

Frankly even given better barrel steels available now than were available 20 years ago I think your expectations of barrel life will prove pretty difficult in the real world. As far as hundred yard 1/4 inch groups from a light hunting rifle, well near fifty years of building, bedding, shooting and tuning accurate hunting rifles kinda says you bet if your shooting one shot groups.
__________________
Bob from Idaho
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 06-07-2008, 08:58 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
keep in mind his rifle is not as light as mine will be. his rifle weighs bout 8lbs, heavy bull barrel. any suggestions as to the build for this caliber
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 06-07-2008, 09:13 PM
faucettb's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Peck, Idaho
Posts: 12,620
If your looking for a switch barrel outfit you've got two choices, Get a Savage long magnum actioned rifle, which is the easiest to deal with a switch barrel or have a gunsmith make you a switch barrel Remington 700. I'd go the Savage both from an accuracy standpoint and a cost standpoint. Savage's with the accu-trigger are proving very accurate and it takes only about 15 minutes to change out a barrel. Midway and others are selling barrels at a reasonable cost along with the barrel nut wrench and barrel vice. Only other thing you need is a go headspace gauge for each caliber you have.

Check out Brownell's tech article on changing out barrels on the Savage to see how it's done. Go here then down to the rifle section, it's the third article down in the rifle section.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/NS/Gun...erarchive.aspx
__________________
Bob from Idaho
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 06-07-2008, 09:36 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
who would u recomend building the savage rifles
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 06-07-2008, 09:53 PM
faucettb's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Peck, Idaho
Posts: 12,620
This is one time that you don't need a gunsmith. Once you have a Savage that will handle the magnum length cartridges you list you can do it yourself. Changing barrels and bolt faces if necessary only takes a few minutes and very few tools. Not lathes, milling machines or any other expensive gunsmithing tools or experience are needed.

You can do your own glassbedding, free floating of barrels and piller bedding. Rebarreling requires no skills other than being careful and following simple directions. Savage's accu-trigger is simple and easy to adjust. The Savage system is easy to work on and with the simple to switch out barrels a dandy gun for trying out different calibers.

If you are into wildcatting you can buy barrels in standard bore diameters and calibers and rent a reamer from several different reamer rental companies to rechamber to a multitude of wildcat's such as the 6.5 STW. Here's a reamer rental company to get an idea of what's available and the rental costs.

4-D Products Rentals
__________________
Bob from Idaho
Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 06-07-2008, 10:12 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
ive never done reaming of a barrel. how is it done?
Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 06-07-2008, 10:13 PM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
here is a list of the calibers i want to do:
8mm rem mag
7x57 mauser
.300 h@h
.257 roberts
7.82 warbird
and a few others
Reply With Quote
  #16  
Old 06-07-2008, 10:42 PM
faucettb's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Peck, Idaho
Posts: 12,620
I'd suggest the following books and DVD's from Brownell's gunsmith supply catalog. There's just to much info to put it in a post on building, installing barrels and chambering to be able to tell you how in a few paragraphs.

THE COMPLETE ILLUSTRATED GUIDE TO PRECISION RIFLE BARREL FITTING

John L. Hinnant. 8½" x 11". Revised third edition 304 pages. Self-covered. Not fancy but a very well illustrated, well written, in-depth analysis that provides both the advanced and beginning student a complete and informative shop manual. Covers literally every aspect of turning, chambering and fitting barrels on bolt action rifles including correct machine lathe setup, tool making and sharpening, threading, chambering, crowning, bolt-facing, plus the proper use and care of reamers. New section devotes 39 pages to action blueprinting.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/sto...RREL%20FITTING

#201 CUSTOM BARRELING BOLT ACTION RIFLES

121 min. DVD. Darrel Holland covers choosing the right barrel, truing the action, machining and lapping locking lugs, plus measuring, turning, threading, chambering and head spacing. Explains crowning and installing muzzle brakes. DVD format only.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/sto...CTION%20RIFLES

#312 BUILDING THE TACTICAL OR VARMINT RIFLE

2 hours, 1 VHS tape. Darrel Holland reveals the secrets of his exclusive V-block bedding system, setup, installation and bedding. Guides you through the process of selecting quality components, plus step-by-step machining and assembly of a rifle capable of putting all the bullets through the same hole. VHS format only.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/sto...ARMINT%20RIFLE

ACCURIZING THE FACTORY RIFLE

M.L.McPherson. 335 pages. 8-1/2" x 11". Softbound. 400+ photos. Well illustrated coverage for all types of actions. Details basic and advanced procedures: fire lapping; muzzle crowning; lapping scope rings and bolt lugs; pillar bedding and glass bedding stocks; installing recoil reducers; barrel removal; receiver truing; bolt way polishing; triggers; sights and new finishes. Plus much more!

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/sto...ACTORY%20RIFLE

RIFLE ACCURACY FACTS

A Common Sense, Plain Language Approach To Improved Rifle Accuracy

Harold R. Vaugh. 290 pages. 6½" x 10 ¼". Softbound. Examines in detail a variety of gunsmithing and handloading issues that affect maximum accuracy from your rifle. Explains topics such as barrel-receiver joint motion, barrel vibration and rigidity, chamber and throat design, plus case neck tension and bullet imbalance.


http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/sto...CURACY%20FACTS

SGBV STOCK 'GLASS BEDDING VIDEO AND KIT

86 minutes, DVD. Gene Shuey shows you how bedding, with Brownells Acraglas Gel®, can help get the most accuracy out of a rifle. Covers wood, fiberglass and plastic rifle stocks, stock strengthening tips, how to match wood colors and more. Includes 2-gun Acraglas Gel kit plus the DVD. DVD format only.

http://www.brownells.com/aspx/ns/store/ProductDetail.aspx?p=25575&title=SGBV%20STOCK%20'G LASS%20BEDDING%20VIDEO%20AND%20KIT


__________________
Bob from Idaho
Reply With Quote
  #17  
Old 06-08-2008, 06:45 AM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 5,856
Quote:
Originally Posted by faucettb View Post
You can do your own glassbedding, free floating of barrels and piller bedding. Rebarreling requires no skills other than being careful and following simple directions. Savage's accu-trigger is simple and easy to adjust. The Savage system is easy to work on and with the simple to switch out barrels a dandy gun for trying out different calibers.
Just to add another comment to what Bob has mentioned, the Savage bolt can be switched to other case sizes as easily as the barrels are changed. I don't like their two piece bolt with the floating head, but I have to admit it works. Also you won't have to cut receiver and bolt lugs to get a good match.
__________________
Still Learnin' as I go!

NRA Life Member

Last edited by MontyF; 06-08-2008 at 06:48 AM. Reason: rephrased for clarity
Reply With Quote
  #18  
Old 06-08-2008, 09:48 AM
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: north carolina
Posts: 24
thank you
that will be a good help. what wildcats do yall mess with
Reply With Quote
  #19  
Old 06-08-2008, 12:15 PM
faucettb's Avatar
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Peck, Idaho
Posts: 12,620
Never been a wildcatter much. Had a Thompson Contender in 357 Herritt at one time, just hated making those cases. I've found that over the years running a gun business that though folks crave to mess with wildcats there's really not anything an existing factory round won't do and when it comes time to move that gun along a wildcat is worth zilch as a trade in or to sell. I killed a full curl Dahl sheep in Alaska at a measured 652 yards with a Ruger 77 30-06 and I'm a magnum fan.

Even the exotic cases like the Ultra-mags and large case Weatherby's are much harder to move than standard calibers. I've got friends whom own pawn shops and they just roll their eyes when someone brings in a wildcat chambering. Basically it kills the value of a nice rifle.

I built a 308 Norma mag when I first started hunting in the early 60's, but loaded ammo and cases were available and still are. In 1978 I went to Remington's 8mm magnum and that was my go to the woods big game gun til a few years ago when I bought a Remington 280 Mountain rifle for a lighter deer gun.

Today if I were going to buy a long range big game rifle it would be a 300 Ultra-mag or a 338 Ultra-mag if I were still in Alaska. I've got a couple of friends shooting those and a 180 grain bullet at 3350 fps has all the reach necessary for any range and game I can think of.

Reality is that shooting big game much over 600 yards is really seldom done and long range target shooting demands a rifle with more barrel life than the large case small bore wildcats give.

Bottom line is have fun and make my friends building guns a bunch of money, it sure can't hurt the economy and if you've got it to spend more power to you.

I shoot the following:

204 Ruger, 32 grain Horned V-Max at 4200 fps
243 Winchester, 55 grain Nosler Ballistic tip at 3900 fps
280 Remington, 139 grain Hornedy SST at 2950 fps
308 Winchester, 150 grain Speer at 2850 fps
8mm Remington mag, 220 grain Hornedy Game King at 3080 fps

I'm not putting down wildcats, lord knows the gunsmiths sure need the business, but in a year or so when the luster wears off and you want to move on to something else it's either another expensive barrel or it's worth nothing but the parts value.
__________________
Bob from Idaho
Reply With Quote
  #20  
Old 06-08-2008, 07:13 PM
Beartooth Regular
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: South Dakota
Posts: 5,856
Quote:
Originally Posted by countryboy View Post
thank you
that will be a good help. what wildcats do yall mess with
I'm pretty much a standard caliber guy too. I have toyed with the idea of screwing a .204 barrel on my Savage model 12 that's in .223. Doing the .204 conversion on my particlar rifle, I wouldn't need any thing but the barrel and the tools Bob previously mentioned.
__________________
Still Learnin' as I go!

NRA Life Member
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes Rate This Thread
Rate This Thread:

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
7mm X .300 Weatherby vs. 7mm STW? Alaska_Man Wildcat Cartridges 123 05-18-2014 05:40 PM
6.5 Jap reloading data fastfreddy Handloading Procedures/Practices 14 06-04-2009 02:47 AM
New Hornedy RCM's and 6.5 Creedmoor faucettb Rifles and Rifle Cartridges 7 07-23-2008 02:24 PM
6.5 Imsha jim johnson Wildcat Cartridges 3 06-06-2008 04:09 PM
7mm dakota or stw? randomblunt Rifles and Rifle Cartridges 7 04-13-2008 05:05 AM


All times are GMT -8. The time now is 05:39 AM.

< Contact Us - Shooters Forum - Archive >

 
 

All Content & Design Copyright © 1999-2002 Beartooth Bullets, All Rights Reserved
View Privacy Policy | Contact Webmaster | Legal Information
Website Design & Development By Exbabylon Internet Solutions
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2