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  #1  
Old 12-15-2012, 02:01 PM
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375 Taylor


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Hello everyone!
I know that this caliber has been talkled about quite much, but i hope you can help me annyway.
Iīm from Sweden, in the middle/north of the country. I almost hunt annything that is legal, moose and bear is my favourite. I have been started to be intressted in some American calibers, and one of them is 375 Taylor. (The other ones is 270W, 416 Taylor and 458WinMag). The reason of the short cartridges is that i hunt with dogs and walk quite much each day. Annyway, my questions about this cartridge is some good loading data. The bullets Iīm qurious about is Barnes TSX 300gr and TTSX 250gr. Over all length and loading data. I donīt know if you are using Norma or Vihtavuori powders? Thatīs the powder Iīm able to get annyway.
I hope you guys could help me with this. Iīm not that good at english, but I think I will get better by time.
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  #2  
Old 12-15-2012, 03:01 PM
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Hasse
I knew of the 416 Taylor, which the 458 Winchester necked down to .416, did not know of the 375 Taylor.
I'm not a admirer of the belted magnums other then the 264 Win mag. I do shoot and load for the 375 Whelen which is the 30-06 necked to 38 caliber. Actually having a second 375 Whelen made based on the Winchester 1895 action.
Good luck on your 416 Taylor adventure.

Jim
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  #3  
Old 12-15-2012, 05:35 PM
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What length action are you using

Dear Hass-91,

It all may come down to how long your magazine box is. The two obvious ones are the 375 H&H or the new 375 Ruger. The 416 Taylor has a dinky shoulder, when you head space on it, instead of the belt. The 375 Taylor or the 375 Ruger, or 38 Newton for that matter, will have plenty of area for head spacing on the shoulders, instead of the belts. The larger diameter of the 375 Ruger case will help with efficiency. A 38 Newton will be dead on. I had to trim my 375 Ruger wildcat, back, shorter than 2.5 inches, if I wanted a 285 Speer Grand Slam to work through an military Mauser M-98 magazine, made for the 7.92 x 57.

I've heard tell of a British 375 made on a belted 30-06 diameter case. That might give you an extra round in your magazine. There is a 375 x 338 Win Mag, that is right in the slot too. I would work backwards from your preferred bullet, and the length of your magazine box. They are all about the same, in the field, and now the rimless Ruger case makes a fine parent for the Newton, which is still the prettiest of the lot, if you have a 30-06 magazine length, instead of one made for the shorter 7.92 x 57 mauser.

I respect your wanting firepower for tangling with Russian Brown Bears, but the .416 x 40 Newton case that an acquaintance mailed to me looks hard to beat. It's made from the 375 Ruger, reformed parent.

Perchance you might consider a 375 x 350 Rem. Mag. in a lighter carbine styled rifle. That would solve the long pointy bullet problem, and still have plenty of "Whump", at close range. I'm taking for granted, that you will put open sights on for close range encounters, with bad tempered Moose and Brown Bears. And that you will have a low enough stock comb, to use them. I have a large, fat, head, and that stopped me from buying a Ruger 375 Ruger Hawkeye. Those rifles have open sights, but with stocks as straight as 2 x 4 boards.
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  #4  
Old 12-15-2012, 11:53 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arkypete View Post
Hasse
I knew of the 416 Taylor, which the 458 Winchester necked down to .416, did not know of the 375 Taylor.
I'm not a admirer of the belted magnums other then the 264 Win mag. I do shoot and load for the 375 Whelen which is the 30-06 necked to 38 caliber. Actually having a second 375 Whelen made based on the Winchester 1895 action.
Good luck on your 416 Taylor adventure.

Jim
Hello Jim!
Well the 375 Taylor is also known as 375/338 WinMag, 375 chaterfield taylor. Itīs a 338 WinMag case thatīs blown out for a 375 bullet. Not as much firepower as 375 Ruger, but itīs far from the original 375 H&H Mag. Wow, i didnīt know about 375 Whelen! I have only heard about 35 Whelen. How is the performance on that caliber? Thanks annyway Jim!
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  #5  
Old 12-16-2012, 12:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carpooler View Post
Dear Hass-91,

It all may come down to how long your magazine box is. The two obvious ones are the 375 H&H or the new 375 Ruger. The 416 Taylor has a dinky shoulder, when you head space on it, instead of the belt. The 375 Taylor or the 375 Ruger, or 38 Newton for that matter, will have plenty of area for head spacing on the shoulders, instead of the belts. The larger diameter of the 375 Ruger case will help with efficiency. A 38 Newton will be dead on. I had to trim my 375 Ruger wildcat, back, shorter than 2.5 inches, if I wanted a 285 Speer Grand Slam to work through an military Mauser M-98 magazine, made for the 7.92 x 57.

I've heard tell of a British 375 made on a belted 30-06 diameter case. That might give you an extra round in your magazine. There is a 375 x 338 Win Mag, that is right in the slot too. I would work backwards from your preferred bullet, and the length of your magazine box. They are all about the same, in the field, and now the rimless Ruger case makes a fine parent for the Newton, which is still the prettiest of the lot, if you have a 30-06 magazine length, instead of one made for the shorter 7.92 x 57 mauser.

I respect your wanting firepower for tangling with Russian Brown Bears, but the .416 x 40 Newton case that an acquaintance mailed to me looks hard to beat. It's made from the 375 Ruger, reformed parent.

Perchance you might consider a 375 x 350 Rem. Mag. in a lighter carbine styled rifle. That would solve the long pointy bullet problem, and still have plenty of "Whump", at close range. I'm taking for granted, that you will put open sights on for close range encounters, with bad tempered Moose and Brown Bears. And that you will have a low enough stock comb, to use them. I have a large, fat, head, and that stopped me from buying a Ruger 375 Ruger Hawkeye. Those rifles have open sights, but with stocks as straight as 2 x 4 boards.
Hi Carpooler!
The magazine box is almost like a standard M98. The rifle is a Husqvarna 1651. I could fit 86,5mm/3,4" cases in there. Itīs the 375/338 WinMag aka 375 Taylor Iīm intresred about. 3+1 will fit in the magazine.
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  #6  
Old 12-16-2012, 06:37 AM
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In one of my manual they call the 375 Taylor the 375/338 Chatfield-Taylor and another one off the 338mag called 375 Durham Magnum has little more case capacity than 375 Taylor. On the 375 Durham they shorten neck length
blew body forward gave little more capacity.

Always fun wildcats
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  #7  
Old 12-16-2012, 06:52 AM
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I strongly considered the 375 Taylor for my lighter African rifle. I thought it a fine cartridge. In 375 I load the Hornady spire point 270 grain, it is very accurate and deadly.

I have never liked the all copper bullets as they foul the barrel and either cut into the powder charge or increase the cartridge overall length. I have loaded them in the 416 Weatherby mag, but thy just showed no accuracy.
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  #8  
Old 12-16-2012, 09:07 AM
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I would think that being from Sweden it would be very simple to neck the 358 Norma Magnum to 375 caliber. You might even find a gunsmith who has already done this in Sweden. You could then use 358 Norma data as a guideline.
Volume 2 Handbook For Shooters & Reloaders has information about the 375/338 Chatfield Taylor. This book is out of print but still available on various auction sites, maybe even on e-bay.
About 35 years ago I had a friend who used the 375/338 C.T. every year moose hunting in Alaska's bear country. His chronographed velocities were only about 50-75 fps below the 375 H&H. He used Noslers old style partitions if I remember correctly and said this rifle and cartridge killed extremely well.
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  #9  
Old 12-16-2012, 09:08 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old roper View Post
In one of my manual they call the 375 Taylor the 375/338 Chatfield-Taylor and another one off the 338mag called 375 Durham Magnum has little more case capacity than 375 Taylor. On the 375 Durham they shorten neck length
blew body forward gave little more capacity.

Always fun wildcats
Hi old roper!
Hmm, never actuly heard of the 375 Durmham Magnum. It really sounds interesting. Itīs some kind of Ackley Improved, right? Yes, you are right about itīs namned 375/338 Chattfield-Taylor. I totaly forgot that. I wounder about wich one of them thatīs most easy to get load data to? And wich of them is the most known?
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  #10  
Old 12-16-2012, 09:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HarryS View Post
I strongly considered the 375 Taylor for my lighter African rifle. I thought it a fine cartridge. In 375 I load the Hornady spire point 270 grain, it is very accurate and deadly.

I have never liked the all copper bullets as they foul the barrel and either cut into the powder charge or increase the cartridge overall length. I have loaded them in the 416 Weatherby mag, but thy just showed no accuracy.
Hi HarryS!
It sounds awsome! I like the copper bullets, rapid expansion, accurate and has not much problem with bones.
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  #11  
Old 12-16-2012, 09:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swampshooter View Post
I would think that being from Sweden it would be very simple to neck the 358 Norma Magnum to 375 caliber. You might even find a gunsmith who has already done this in Sweden. You could then use 358 Norma data as a guideline.
Volume 2 Handbook For Shooters & Reloaders has information about the 375/338 Chatfield Taylor. This book is out of print but still available on various auction sites, maybe even on e-bay.
About 35 years ago I had a friend who used the 375/338 C.T. every year moose hunting in Alaska's bear country. His chronographed velocities were only about 50-75 fps below the 375 H&H. He used Noslers old style partitions if I remember correctly and said this rifle and cartridge killed extremely well.
Hi swampshooter!
Itīs actuly a 358NM rifle that I`m gonna build on. The Husqvarna 1651 is only made in 358NM if Iīm not totaly wrong. 338WinMag and 358NM is quite similar to each other. I will fireform the magnum cartridges I will get my hands on.

That handbook i need to get my hands on! Would be great if SAAMI would accept the 375/338C-T or the 375DH and maby start to build some firearms in the caliber. But now when the 375 Ruger exist itīs no use to it. Yea, i have been reading about someone in Alaska who is using the 375/338C-T on moose and bear, and he said that itīs the best caliber he ever been used.

I like the magnum belt on the cartidges, dono why actuly.
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  #12  
Old 12-16-2012, 09:44 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hasse-91 View Post
Hi old roper!
Hmm, never actuly heard of the 375 Durmham Magnum. It really sounds interesting. Itīs some kind of Ackley Improved, right? Yes, you are right about itīs namned 375/338 Chattfield-Taylor. I totaly forgot that. I wounder about wich one of them thatīs most easy to get load data to? And wich of them is the most known?

The 375 Durmham Mag maybe sort of Ackley but haven't seen shoulder angle and I'm sure there may be reamer print plus case have to be fireformed.


I neck down the 338mag case to 30 and I've been shooting the 30-338mag about 27 yrs now just had my 3rd one build couple years ago. Don't get me wrong I do like the Ackley's one of my favorite ones is the 35 WhelenAI along with few others.

One thing I've done on belt mag cases is having gunsmith headspaced on the shoulder instead of the belt little easier on cases.

Hard to say which one would be better know and one problem is most avid wildcater look at manuals for wildcats as never know what may be next project vs someone who may just focus on one that their interested in.

I always enjoy Carpooler post he come up with some good idea's.

I don't mind blowing cases out even shorten a wildcat case that's my fun but for most necking case up down is lot easier and you can spend more time shooting so you have to pick what you like.

Other problem is access to reamers/dies.
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  #13  
Old 12-16-2012, 10:16 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by old roper View Post
The 375 Durmham Mag maybe sort of Ackley but haven't seen shoulder angle and I'm sure there may be reamer print plus case have to be fireformed.


I neck down the 338mag case to 30 and I've been shooting the 30-338mag about 27 yrs now just had my 3rd one build couple years ago. Don't get me wrong I do like the Ackley's one of my favorite ones is the 35 WhelenAI along with few others.

One thing I've done on belt mag cases is having gunsmith headspaced on the shoulder instead of the belt little easier on cases.

Hard to say which one would be better know and one problem is most avid wildcater look at manuals for wildcats as never know what may be next project vs someone who may just focus on one that their interested in.

I always enjoy Carpooler post he come up with some good idea's.

I don't mind blowing cases out even shorten a wildcat case that's my fun but for most necking case up down is lot easier and you can spend more time shooting so you have to pick what you like.

Other problem is access to reamers/dies.
I know that RCBS has tools for 375/338C-T. I dono about reamers...
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  #14  
Old 12-16-2012, 10:31 AM
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Too many cooks spoil ---

Hasse-91.

There are probably five or six iterations of the 375 Taylor, Chatfield Taylor, et al.. Problem is they all head space on the belt. The Whelen is over bore on what the factories will accept for shoulder to head space on. The 38 Newton, the 375 Ruger, and the wildcats, made on the WSM's all have to head space on a shoulder.

The belt worked best on the H&H model, with gently sloping shoulders. It leads to double head spacing on sharp shoulders in bottle neck cartridges. Remember that anything made from the 375 Ruger as a parent is like boring an automobile engine, to +.030". The new case heads are the same as the belt's diameter, but no more double head spacing, and no more multiple chambers and reloading dies to trip over.

I've put the 375 on the back burner, because I didn't want my wildcat to drop into a factory 375 Ruger chamber. I went with a .416, which also can drop into the newer 416 Ruger, but I use either basic brass or 375 head stamped brass. That way my bullet keeps it out of any 375 Ruger chamber.

In your neck of the woods, a 38 Newton, made from Ruger brass, or the new wildcat from Cody, Wyo., the .416 Newton, which has exactly the same volume as my slightly longer, and more streamlined 10.6 x 375 Ruger, will also do what you want. You just load it with a 350 gr. Speer Mag Tip, at 2400 fps. These don't kick you in your teeth, and shoot flat. They are close to the older 400 Jeffery, not the bigger 404 Jeffery. My military Mauser M-98 is still under 9 lbs, with a scope. But it does have the mag box opened up to accept a 3.5 inch long round. There's still plenty of steel in the bottom, behind the bottom bolt lug. And of course the more modern looking 416 is shorter, albeit, while I can resize a 375 Ruger case, and barely have to kiss the mouth in a trimmer, the man from Cody has to really go at it to get each one of his, trimmed back to 2.5 inches.

After all is said and done, I am a little surprised that you don't just go with the new C.I.P. 375 Holderlin. It must be very close to what you are looking for, and just like the Taylors. And it has been legitimized, by C.I.P., so there's only one, spec drawing. But unless you've been having trouble with 35 cal. bullets, that 358 Norma Magnum is murder on both ends, in a light rifle. So is the factory ammo for the 375 Ruger. If you are looking for the big push, instead of being slapped silly, remember this comes at the cost of the Norma's flat trajectory. Those 285 gr. Grand Slams I want to use in my future 375, have really long noses, ahead of their cannelures. That detail, brings one right back to your 375 Taylor, or the 375 x 338 Win. Mag./38 Newton. They look to be a little on the heavy side for a 375 WSM, as the shank will protrude down into the belly of the short necked cases. As a parting shot, the developers of the Holderlin said they kept the 8 x 68 Schuler's profile for reasons of controlling recoil. They knew they could get more volume, but the trade off was too much punch on the back end.

I feel the same way. My 375 x 8mmx66mm would have the volume of the 300 Win Mag, necked up 375 caliber, but mine is only 2.4 inches long, in the original 3.3 inch long magazine box, made for the 7.92 x 57mm military rounds. If I open this one up too. I can have 2.5 inches, or a little more.

But this would only be for me to use the particular bullet that I want, not worry about a few more feet per second.
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  #15  
Old 12-16-2012, 11:55 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carpooler View Post
Hasse-91.

There are probably five or six iterations of the 375 Taylor, Chatfield Taylor, et al.. Problem is they all head space on the belt. The Whelen is over bore on what the factories will accept for shoulder to head space on. The 38 Newton, the 375 Ruger, and the wildcats, made on the WSM's all have to head space on a shoulder.

The belt worked best on the H&H model, with gently sloping shoulders. It leads to double head spacing on sharp shoulders in bottle neck cartridges. Remember that anything made from the 375 Ruger as a parent is like boring an automobile engine, to +.030". The new case heads are the same as the belt's diameter, but no more double head spacing, and no more multiple chambers and reloading dies to trip over.

I've put the 375 on the back burner, because I didn't want my wildcat to drop into a factory 375 Ruger chamber. I went with a .416, which also can drop into the newer 416 Ruger, but I use either basic brass or 375 head stamped brass. That way my bullet keeps it out of any 375 Ruger chamber.

In your neck of the woods, a 38 Newton, made from Ruger brass, or the new wildcat from Cody, Wyo., the .416 Newton, which has exactly the same volume as my slightly longer, and more streamlined 10.6 x 375 Ruger, will also do what you want. You just load it with a 350 gr. Speer Mag Tip, at 2400 fps. These don't kick you in your teeth, and shoot flat. They are close to the older 400 Jeffery, not the bigger 404 Jeffery. My military Mauser M-98 is still under 9 lbs, with a scope. But it does have the mag box opened up to accept a 3.5 inch long round. There's still plenty of steel in the bottom, behind the bottom bolt lug. And of course the more modern looking 416 is shorter, albeit, while I can resize a 375 Ruger case, and barely have to kiss the mouth in a trimmer, the man from Cody has to really go at it to get each one of his, trimmed back to 2.5 inches.

After all is said and done, I am a little surprised that you don't just go with the new C.I.P. 375 Holderlin. It must be very close to what you are looking for, and just like the Taylors. And it has been legitimized, by C.I.P., so there's only one, spec drawing. But unless you've been having trouble with 35 cal. bullets, that 358 Norma Magnum is murder on both ends, in a light rifle. So is the factory ammo for the 375 Ruger. If you are looking for the big push, instead of being slapped silly, remember this comes at the cost of the Norma's flat trajectory. Those 285 gr. Grand Slams I want to use in my future 375, have really long noses, ahead of their cannelures. That detail, brings one right back to your 375 Taylor, or the 375 x 338 Win. Mag./38 Newton. They look to be a little on the heavy side for a 375 WSM, as the shank will protrude down into the belly of the short necked cases. As a parting shot, the developers of the Holderlin said they kept the 8 x 68 Schuler's profile for reasons of controlling recoil. They knew they could get more volume, but the trade off was too much punch on the back end.

I feel the same way. My 375 x 8mmx66mm would have the volume of the 300 Win Mag, necked up 375 caliber, but mine is only 2.4 inches long, in the original 3.3 inch long magazine box, made for the 7.92 x 57mm military rounds. If I open this one up too. I can have 2.5 inches, or a little more.

But this would only be for me to use the particular bullet that I want, not worry about a few more feet per second.
I have actuly been thinking about 375 Ruger, but Iīm still "in love" with the magnum belt. There is tools for both of them, shells for ruger but itīs not hard to create shells to 375/338C-T. It maby doesnīt really matter wich one i choose, I just know that ruger has slightly larger case capacity than 375 H&H. And it doesnīt seem to be hard to get the C-T in similar speeds as 375 H&H
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  #16  
Old 12-16-2012, 12:06 PM
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If penetration is what you want; thing about keeping the 358 Norma mag. At 250 grains I believe it has better sectional density than the 300 gr 375 bullets. Sectional density with a stout bullet means more penetration in my book.
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  #17  
Old 12-16-2012, 07:18 PM
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I doesn't like the 358NM, the recoil is so rappid and sharp. That's why i climb up to larger calibers. I like the recoil long and heavy. My 9,3*62 is just like that. Penetration also depends on wich bullet i use.
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  #18  
Old 12-17-2012, 05:50 AM
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Only for the ambitious...

If you must have a belt, Hornady offers belted Basic brass under p/n 8798 for about $52 a box of 50. My wildcat uses the 375 Ruger Basic, a case having a .532" head (13.51 mm) and no belt. They come about 68 mm in length. You design the wildcat around those parameters and go from there. Once you're all done, you'll have something unique in all the world and will feel something truly special the first time you drop some game with it.

I'm presently working on a .358-caliber version of my successful .30-caliber round. Gunsmith has much of it, but we're still waiting on Lilja to produce the barrel. My round could be made into a .375, but there are plenty of those already. No need for that...
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  #19  
Old 12-17-2012, 06:05 AM
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What about the .375x300 Magnum? It's a 300 WinMag case necked out to .375 and keeps the parent case its original length. It's been around a while, and Mike Belm says they shoot like varmint guns. I'm sure reamers and dies should be available. Check to see what RCBS has in regard to this cartridge...

http://ammoguide.com/?catid=526

Last edited by nvshooter; 12-17-2012 at 08:09 AM.
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  #20  
Old 12-17-2012, 08:29 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nvshooter View Post
If you must have a belt, Hornady offers belted Basic brass under p/n 8798 for about $52 a box of 50. My wildcat uses the 375 Ruger Basic, a case having a .532" head (13.51 mm) and no belt. They come about 68 mm in length. You design the wildcat around those parameters and go from there. Once you're all done, you'll have something unique in all the world and will feel something truly special the first time you drop some game with it.

I'm presently working on a .358-caliber version of my successful .30-caliber round. Gunsmith has much of it, but we're still waiting on Lilja to produce the barrel. My round could be made into a .375, but there are plenty of those already. No need for that...
I actuly have no experiens of wildcats at all.... I tough the 375/338C-T was quite common in US, Canada and Alaska? I doesnīt know at all where to go to get reamer, tools or loading data if i made a wildcat from scratch. Thatīs why i would like to get something thatīs possible to get the tools and reamer and then i have my rifle. And some clue on what load weight i will start and stop at.
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