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  #81  
Old 01-26-2017, 11:24 AM
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Time for a TPV story.
When I was in high school a long time ago, I went bow hunting with a friend one evening. In October down here in Texas, we have a lot of snake movement in the evening. My friend let me out and went on to his stand. I walked toward my stand. When I put my foot down near the log, a big rattler came back and hit me hard right on the instep of my boot. Well, I thought I was going to die right there, especially when I could see venom and one fang in the boot. I hollered to my friend, "Rattlesnake, he got me!" ( just like in the movies) My buddy gunned the truck trying to get to me , hit a pothole and broke two teeth and busted his lip.
As I took my boot off, my whole leg was turning numb, I figured I had one hour left so I said a few prayers. Got my sock off and found out that the fangs didn't make it through the boot. Good ol pair of Irish Setters.
My friend had blood all over his face and fared a lot worse then me. My friend is the guy in my avatar fifty years later. I had to clean his deer for that!
I hate snakes!
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Last edited by tpv; 01-26-2017 at 11:38 AM.
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  #82  
Old 01-28-2017, 09:15 PM
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Is there a problem with knockoffs regarding this product? Just wondering why the questions regarding the originality.
The smell is distinctive. Being as that is the only product I have been exposed to, I cannot vouch for its originality by the smell. I will go back to the can and see what I can find. Better yet, i will go to the invoice and pull up the website and do some reading.
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  #83  
Old 01-28-2017, 10:36 PM
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"Is there a problem with knockoffs regarding this product?"

Sorry, I am not sure I know what you mean by that, Calico? Then I may be able to answer the question.

This is the real stuff:

http://www.ballistol.de/44-1-NEO-BAL...ausmittel.html

Largest container is one litre (about two pints).
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Last edited by MusgraveMan; 01-28-2017 at 11:34 PM.
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  #84  
Old 01-29-2017, 04:00 PM
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Sorry for the slang. "Knockoff" as in a fake or a copy.

I got mine through this website. www.ballistol.com
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Last edited by 1Calicocat; 01-29-2017 at 04:03 PM.
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  #85  
Old 01-29-2017, 08:13 PM
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Ahh, "goddit"., thank you Calico. I am still in a learning process regarding the American language and to my embarrassment often find myself at a loss.

Unless they import the oil in bulk from Germany and re-package it they may possibly have re-engineered it. The German product lists the original mix of ingredients, and with the original packaging the pharmacology of the medicinal properties are also described.

Their claims for its outstanding ability in gun cleaning and wide application of uses certainly is no false boast. Being an American company they will not even mention the medicinal abilities or even the fact that these were the original drivers and not gun cleaning. Next time you suffer a burn (or cut) try it. First application on a fresh burn may let you immediately regret the advice - but soon all the pain will subside. As soon as the wound appears to be dry it is time for another light application. The quick recovery of damaged tissue is incredible.
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Last edited by MusgraveMan; 01-30-2017 at 02:57 AM.
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  #86  
Old 01-30-2017, 07:23 AM
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Originally Posted by MusgraveMan View Post
Ahh, "goddit"., thank you Calico. I am still in a learning process regarding the American language and to my embarrassment often find myself at a loss.
Yeah, I find myself in the same situation at times.

Thanks for the information. I may run into a dead end, but I am going to look into this a little more. I would hope that it is the original product I have. It certainly works well for what I use it for.

Edit: The website refers customers outside the United States to Klever in Germany. Whether or not the association is real or merely implied, I have no way of knowing. I have sent an email to the company with the question as to whether or not this is the original formula or if it has been re-engineered.
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Last edited by 1Calicocat; 01-30-2017 at 08:10 AM.
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  #87  
Old 01-30-2017, 09:43 AM
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Certainly when I am back in Colorado I shall check it out as I hate being without it. Brought three small bottles with me last time and TSA wanted to confiscate it so I emptied the bottles into a trash bin and gave them the bottles.
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  #88  
Old 02-04-2017, 12:38 PM
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I flew out of Luanda within a day or two of the ban on liquids coming in, in 06.

There were bottles of all sorts being a passed back along the line to the first security/third bribe taking point; whisky, fancy aftershave. They even tried to confiswipe a stick of lip balm from one guy, he flicked the stick onto the floor and ground it in with his foot, and gave them the container.

I'm not going to insult snakes or parasites by likening those...
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  #89  
Old 02-05-2017, 02:19 PM
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I like all reptiles but especially snakes. I grew up in and lived in Georgia for 62 years. We were in prime canebrake rattler territory. These can be huge snakes with 6 & 7 foot specimens documented. The eastern diamondback gets much bigger but are rare above the (Ga) fall line. We constantly had them on our porch, all over the yard, in the outbuildings and in the road. I would usually stop and move them off the road because too many people will kill them just for being snakes. There were also copperheads and pygmy rattlesnakes by the truckload. A little farther north was timber rattlesnake habitat. Cottonmouths were very common anywhere there was water. We were a little too far north for coral snakes.

Copperheads and pygmy rattlers are very pugnacious and will readily strike without hesitation if disturbed. The little pygmy is very tiny and not in the crotalus genus with the timber, and canebrake (a subspecies of the timber) crotalus horridus. Their rattle is so tiny one has to be uncomfortably close to hear it. It sounds much like a buzzing housefly. But their venom is extremely toxic; but due to their small size, only a small amount is delivered with each bite unlike the others. I've kept copperheads over the summer in terrariums but let them go in time to fatten up for the winter. Canebrake rattlers are, in general, loath to strike and will often endure much poking and prodding without striking; this is also true of diamondbacks. All these snakes are very valuable since they consume large quantities of rodents. It's the diamondback that commonly eats larger animals. One of my dogs was bitten by a 3' copperhead. I caught the snake and make him serve time in my maximum security terrarium. The dogs head swelled alarmingly until there was virtually no muzzle showing. We kept her inside and closely monitored her and made sure she could breath. She recovered without aftereffects. Had it been a canebrake, even a small one, she would have died very quickly.

Despite my statement concerning the "docility" of canebrakes, a man was bitten and died shortly before we moved. The incident occurred in our general area of the county. As reported, the man was deer hunting that fall with relatives - a son and a nephew, I think it was. He had climbed down out of a tree stand and was immediately bitten by a rattler. Within moments his son and nephew came to his aid and called the EMTs. It took about 15 minutes to get him out of the woods to the ambulance. He was pronounced DOA by the EMT. So the bite was lethal within 15 or 20 minutes. Nothing in this world is guaranteed and there are always exceptions. But to put this in perspective, also near us there was a married, retired couple from UGA. When the wife didn't make a timely return home from her morning jog, her husband drove out looking for her. The following morning they were found dead, lying by the husband's car. They had been mauled to death by a pack of wild dogs that were using an old farm shack as shelter. Turned out the land owner knew about the animals and had let them remain there unmolested. The sheriff's Dept managed to kill all the dogs and also charged the owner with a criminal charge. Wild dogs were a constant problem where we lived. I'd encountered them on occasion, myself. The problem is actually state wide. C'est la vie!
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  #90  
Old 02-18-2017, 03:29 AM
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Great write up MM. Thankfully living in Northern Idaho I never deal with poisonous snakes. My only experiences with poisonous snakes comes from almost two years spent in Guyana and Colombia working in private security. Most of those two years were spent in the bush, in the deep reaches of the Amazon and its tributaries. There were two snakes I was always on the look out for, the Bushmaster and the Lancehead. I had several very close encounters with large Bushmasters, the largest was killed and slightly over ten feet long and 13lbs in weight. I skinned that one, but wasn't able to bring the skin back to the states. I actually stepped on that one.. very scary experience. I was never bitten, but snake pants saved my life twice. Miserable pants to wear in the jungle but were worth ever single penny and bead of sweat. On a lighter note, found baby Anacondas, very neat snakes, and lots of Rainbow Boas, another absolutely gorgeous snake!! The largest Rainbow boa I saw was measured at 12 ft!!! I never saw any giant anacondas, but caimans were every where. Those are sure nasty critters as well!
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  #91  
Old 02-18-2017, 10:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IDTrapper View Post
Great write up MM. Thankfully living in Northern Idaho I never deal with poisonous snakes. My only experiences with poisonous snakes comes from almost two years spent in Guyana and Colombia working in private security. Most of those two years were spent in the bush, in the deep reaches of the Amazon and its tributaries. There were two snakes I was always on the look out for, the Bushmaster and the Lancehead. I had several very close encounters with large Bushmasters, the largest was killed and slightly over ten feet long and 13lbs in weight. I skinned that one, but wasn't able to bring the skin back to the states. I actually stepped on that one.. very scary experience. I was never bitten, but snake pants saved my life twice. Miserable pants to wear in the jungle but were worth ever single penny and bead of sweat. On a lighter note, found baby Anacondas, very neat snakes, and lots of Rainbow Boas, another absolutely gorgeous snake!! The largest Rainbow boa I saw was measured at 12 ft!!! I never saw any giant anacondas, but caimans were every where. Those are sure nasty critters as well!
Wow... I have had a wish since being 11 years old, learning in school geography about the Amazon to work there. Wow again.

Know the Bushmaster but not the Lancehead - shall look it up.
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  #92  
Old 02-18-2017, 10:32 AM
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I looked them both up MM. Further reinforces my position on keeping my blaster near by.

Cheezywan
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  #93  
Old 02-18-2017, 11:12 AM
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Ugly as sin. Amazing experience I have just had: I know all our snakes quite well and they do not scare me. I know how to avoid them when confronted. Rattle snakes also do not scare me. These two create a distinct feeling of uneasiness within me. A possible threat I know very little about. Also understand now the apprehension every visitor here has for our snakes, while we think it is unnecessary.
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  #94  
Old 02-18-2017, 01:58 PM
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The Lance head or Fer de Lance, is a very agressive snake. They will lay over a path or trail and often look like a stick or at night it's impossible to see them. When you step over them they strike repeatedly in quick succession, they will give chase, it's quite a rush especially at night. But they mainly are on the move hunting. The Bushmasters will lay along logs next to trails, or in tall grass they are mainly a ambush snake, living in brush piles etc. They are huge. There was also a assortment of adders, vipers and rattlesnakes of different kinds. I just finished reading your spider post MM, I will have to share several fun spider stories as well. The area I worked in had high concentrations of the Goliath Birdeater spider among others. I believe they are one of the largest spiders in the world. I've seen and handled a few, quite the predator!!!!
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  #95  
Old 02-18-2017, 09:53 PM
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Originally Posted by Cheezywan View Post
I looked them both up MM. Further reinforces my position on keeping my blaster near by.

Cheezywan
Bushblastermaster.

I do not like the looks of that Bushmaster at all. It seems obviously dangerous.
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  #96  
Old 02-18-2017, 10:26 PM
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For all cytotoxic venomous snake bites

This is long and the critical treatment is repeated, but anyone near the viper species must have knowledge of it. The first action of limb bandaging and immobilising the limb is of utmost importance. Lack of doing it is the main reason for death even after proper polyvalent antivenom is administered. Immediate and subsequent treatment is critical. Even when treated properly 52% of patients die from these.

It is dedicated to the puff adder but valid for all cytotoxic venomous snake bites

Puff Adder
(Bitis arietans)
The bite of the Puff Adder with subsequent envenomation is a medical emergency and can be fatal if the patient is not treated appropriately. Please read the attached Medical Management Protocol and respond appropriately.

The seven most dangerous snakes in South Africa-puff-adder.jpg
First Aid:
Bandage and immobilize the bitten limb with crepe bandages and splint as described in the Immediate First Aid section. Rest this extremity below the level of the patient's heart (if practical).
Transport to U.C.S.D. Medical Center Trauma Service.

Medical Management:
Call your local Poison Control Center.

Observe for Signs and Symptoms of Envenomation.
If significant systemic signs or symptoms are present, perform the following:

Administer Lactated Ringers Solution at 200 to 250 mls per hour.

Draw samples and collect initial laboratory data.
Dilute the contents of 5 vials of SAIMR Polyvalent Antivenom in Lactated Ringers Solution to a total volume of 300ml. Administer the antivenom I.V. piggyback over 75 minutes at a rate of 240ml/hour (i.e. one vial per 15 minutes). The combined rate of diluted antivenom and Lactated Ringers Solution is now approximately 500ml/hour. The rate of Lactated Ringers Solution may be adjusted accordingly to avoid fluid overload, however a brisk urine output should be a treatment goal.
When one complete vial has been infused (i.e. 15 minutes, 60 cc), remove the splints and crepe bandage slowly over a period 10 minutes. If symptoms progress rapidly, reapply the bandage, wait 10 minutes, and then again release the bandage slowly over 10 minutes while antivenom administration is continuing.

Allergic or untoward reactions to the antivenom should be treated with Benadryl, Epinephrine, and/or Corticosteroids. A patient with known sensitivity to horse serum may be pretreated with 1 gm of Solumedrol, administered I.V. push.

Monitor Signs, Symptoms, and Laboratory data, and administer additional antivenom in 1 vial increments at a rate of one vial every 15 minutes as necessary to control the progression of symptoms.

The required amount of antivenom will vary with the severity of envenomation. One should anticipate using (including the initial dose):

5 vials for a minor bite with envenomation

10 vials may be necessary for moderate or severe bites.

The use of less than five vials of antivenom in the treatment of a bite with systemic envenomation increases the risk for complications and may even result in death.

MEDICAL MANAGEMENT
for bites by
Puff Adder
(Bitis arietans)

Studies have shown that more than 50% of severe envenomations left untreated result in death. Envenomation may cause severe hypotension/shock as well as hemolytic, coagulopathic, hemorrhagic, and local reactions. Death may ensue rapidly but more commonly occurs in 12-24 hours.

Please read and execute the following procedures without delay.

A crepe bandage and splint have been applied as immediate first aid adjuncts to retard the absorption of the venom. DO NOT remove until the patient has arrived at the hospital and is receiving the antivenom.

Make sure 10 vials of SAIMR Polyvalent Antivenom are present with the patient. This antivenom is specific and is only available directly from the San Diego Zoo Reptile Department. Refrigerate the antivenom upon arrival to the hospital.

If the patient has been envenomated, the treatment is at least 5 vials of intravenous antivenom. Envenomation is diagnosed by the presence of characteristic signs and symptoms. Necessary information follows and is organized into the following sections:

Signs and Symptoms of Envenomation:

Local Affects:
  • Pain and swelling: onset almost immediately after bite
  • Blistering, bleb formation
  • Ecchymosis
  • Tissue necrosis: onset usually days after bite
  • Cardiovascular:
  • Hypotension: onset immediately
  • Bradycardia
  • Tachycardia
  • Hematological:
  • Coagulation defects
  • Thrombocytopenia: onset within four hours after bite
  • Spontaneous bleeding:
  • Mucosal bleeding: within 4 hours after bite
  • Epistaxsis
  • Ecchymosis
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Internal hemorrhage
  • Hematuria
  • Anemia: secondary to bleeding into bitten limb,
  • spontaneous bleeding, microangiopathic hemolysis etc.
  • Renal/Urinary:
  • Hematuria
  • Hemoglobinuria
  • Myoglobinuria
  • Renal failure

General:
  • Nausea/Emesis
  • Fever
  • Regional Lymphadenopathy

Fang Marks: The presence of fang marks does not always imply envenomation as the Puff Adder is known to bite without injecting venom into the victim. However, the absence of fang marks does not necessarily preclude the possibility of a bite, nor does it give any indication of the severity of the bite. Fang marks may be present as one or more well defined punctures, as a series of small lacerations or scratches, or there may not be any noticeable or obvious markings where the bite occurred. Finally, multiple bites inflicted by a single snake are possible and should be noted if present.

Those signs and symtoms which give strong evidence for systemic envenomation include spontaneous bleeding, thrombocytopenia, hypotension, bradycardia, and local swelling of more than half the affected limb. Antivenom should be administered without delay in such cases.

Medical Management:

Admit patient to the Trauma Service and call consultants listed on the last page.

Begin a peripheral intravenous infusion (16 gauge catheter) of Lactated Ringers Solution at a rate of 250 cc/hour.
Draw blood from the contralateral arm, and collect urine for the following laboratory tests. Mark STAT.
Type and Cross Match TWO units of Whole blood. Obtain fresh, frozen plasma.
CBC with differential and quantitive platelet count.

Coagulation Parameters:
a. Prothrombin Time (PT)
b. Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT)
c. Fibrinogen Levels
d. Fibrin Degradation Products

Serum Electrolytes, BUN/Creatinine, Calcium, Phosphorus.

Lactate Dehydrogenase (with Isoenzyme analysis). Isoenzyme analysis may indicate multiple targets of the venom components which may dictate further management.
Urinalysis (Macroscopic and Microscopic Analysis).

Must include analysis for:
  • Free Protein
  • Hemoglobin
  • Myoglobin

Electrocardiogram (Sinus Tachycardia would be expected).
Continuous Urine Output Monitoring (In dwelling Foley Catheter if unconscious). Watch for possible oliguria or anuria.

Additional tests as needed or indicated by the patient's hospital course.
The patient's vital signs should be monitored frequently the first 48 hours after the bite for evidence of hypotension, bradycardia, or circulatory shock.

Coagulation parameters should be repeated at four hour intervals until coagulation factors begin to recover.

CBC with platelet counts should be repeated periodically. Plateletes and hematocrit levels may continue to decline up to 48 hours after the bite especially in the undertreated patient.
It may be necessary or practical to repeat some of the above serum and urine tests over the hospital course to monitor the effects of antivenom therapy or to detect late changes in laboratory values.

OBSERVE PATIENT CLOSELY for signs and symptoms of envenomation which usually manifest between 15 minutes and two hours after the bite occurred.
If NONE of the signs or symptoms have been noted after TWO hours, there is the possibility that the patient received a dry bite (no venom injected).

VERY SLOWLY begin to remove the bandages and splint watching carefully for any changes in the patient's status. If any changes occur, assume the patient has been envenomated and prepare to give antivenom immediately (as directed below).
If signs and symptoms still fail to manifest, continue CLOSE observation of the patient for an additional 12 to 24 hours.

IF SIGNIFICANT SYSTEMIC SIGNS OR SYMPTOMS become apparent, begin antivenom therapy as follows:

Dilute the contents of 5 vials of SAIMR Polyvalent Antivenom in Lactated Ringers Solution to a total volume of 300ml. Administer the antivenom I.V. piggyback over 75 minutes at a rate of 240ml/hour (i.e. one vial per 15 minutes). The combined rate of diluted antivenom and Lactated Ringers Solution is now approximately 500ml/hour. The rate of Lactated Ringers Solution may be adjusted accordingly to avoid fluid overload, however a brisk urine output should be a treatment goal.
Should any signs of ALLERGY/ANAPHYLAXIS (e.g., coughing, dyspnea, urticaria, itching, increased oral secretions, etc.) develop, immediately discontinue the administration of antivenom, and treat symptoms with Corticosteroids, Epinephrine, Benadryl, Atarax and/or Antihistamines. As soon as the patient is stabilized, continue the antivenom infusion at a slower rate. (i.e. 120ml/hour).

After 15 minutes of antivenom administration, the splint and the bandages may be removed. This should be done VERY SLOWLY over a period of 10 minutes to prevent a bolus release of venom. If the patient's condition worsens, reapply the crepe bandage, wait 10 minutes and release the bandage again slowly over 10 minutes while antivenom administration is continuing.

Antivenom Therapy is the mainstay of treatment for Puff Adder snake envenomation. Many of the symptoms are ameliorated or entirely eliminated by the antivenom alone. Other symptoms will require additional therapeutic modalities in order to be corrected.

Cardiovascular status: The administration of antivenom alone will help correct hypotension, bradycardia, and signs of circulatory shock provided the patient is not hypovolemic. Intravenous administration of Lactated Ringers Solution is warranted in all cases. Cardiovascular stability and a brisk diuresis are desired.

Hematological signs and symptoms: Puff Adder venom has both procoagulant and anticoagulant activity, and thus bite victims may show a variety of responses. In addition the venom is toxic to vascular endothelial tissue and has hemorrhagic activity as well. Bite victims frequently develop thrombocytopenia, decreased fibrinogen levels, and spontaneous bleeding. Disseminated intravascular coagulopathy and anemia may likewise occur. Case reports reveal no consistent change in the PT or PTT; these parameters may be normal or prolonged. Death from severe envenomation is usually the result of internal hemorrhage and circulatory shock. The patient should be monitored closely and blood products including whole blood, packed RBC's platelets, cryoprecipitate, and fresh frozen plasma should be given when indicated.

Renal: Puff Adder venom binds to renal tissue resulting in hematuria. Hemoglobinuria and myoglobinuria may likewise affect renal function, and if severe, acute renal failure may necessitate peritoneal dialysis.

Neurological symptoms are uncommon with Puff Adder bites.

It is important to keep venom neutralization current and continuous. The best method to accomplish this is to monitor the patient's status. If the present condition does not improve, or should it worsen for any reason, additional antivenom should be administered. Give all additional antivenom in one vial increments. Dilute the antivenom in Lactated Ringers as before and administer the antivenom I.V. piggyback over approximately 15 minutes. Bites with envenomation require at least 5 vials but severe envenomations may require up to 10 vials of antivenom.

It is advisable to perform periodic serum and urine analyses during therapy (as outlined above).
It is always best to keep the patient in an Intensive Care setting until free of major symptoms for 24 hours. The patient should be observed in the hospital for at least 24 hours after all symptoms abate.

General Considerations:

It is important that the patient remain resting and warm. Avoid unnecessary movement.
Symptom variability: There is a marked variability of symptoms in response to a Puff Adder bite. It is important to note the continual progression of signs and symptoms throughout the course of therapy and to give additional antivenom as necessary.

Circulatory Shock: Hypotension and bradycardia are frequent complications of Puff Adder bites. Plasma expanders and/or vasopressor agents may be given when appropriate, but will be most effective if adequate antivenom has been appropriately administered.

Fluid Management: The patient should be well hydrated, and a brisk urine output should be maintained. Blood products should not be given until circulating venom has been neutralized with antivenom.

Compartment Syndrome: It should be noted that fascial compartment syndromes in Puff Adder bites are uncommon. Limbs may swell significantly, but rarely involve specific fascially bound compartments. If however the logistics of the bite raise a high index of suspicion for compartment syndrome, monitoring with a Wick Catheter or appropriate pressure device may be necessary. Fasciotomy is rarely, if ever, recommended.

Tetanus Prophylaxis should be current.

Antibiotics are not recommended prophylactically.

Antivenom is the best treatment for all signs and symptoms of Puff Adder bites and should be utilized prior to other treatment modalities.

Special Considerations:

Multiple Bites:

It is possible for a Puff Adder to deliver more than one bite in a single attack. If there is evidence that such an attack occurred (i.e., history or multiple bite sites), give the initial dose of 5 vials but be prepared to give a total of 10 vials to adequately treat the bite. Titrate antivenom administration to signs and symptoms as discussed previously.

Testing for Equine Protein Sensitivity:

It is NOT ADVISABLE to utilize subcutaneous or intradermal testing for sensitivity to equine products in that such testing may be unreliable, and may unnecessarily delay antivenom therapy which must be used if any signs of Puff Adder envenomation are present.

If there is reason to believe that the patient may be sensitive to equine protein products:
Premedicate the patient with 1 gm Solumedrol, administered I.V. push. Assuming the patient's condition is stable, wait 15-30 minutes before administering the antivenom.

Administer the diluted antivenom at a rate as tolerated by the patient beginning at a rate of 120ml/hour (as opposed to the normal 240ml/hour rate). If the patient tolerates this, increase the rate up to 240ml/hour.

Monitor Pulse and Blood Pressure carefully. Be prepared to treat for Anaphylaxis.

Clinical Experience with the Puff Adder:
The Puff Adder (Bitis arietans) probably accounts for more deaths than any other snake in Africa. An adult Puff Adder may have enough venom to kill 4-5 men and studies show severe envenomations have a 52% mortality rate. The utilization of antivenom dramatically reduces the mortality rate but deaths have occurred when inadequate amounts of antivenom (i.e. four vials or less) have been administered.

Prompt recognition of clinical envenomation, and adequate amounts of antivenom delivered early in the treatment course will facilitate a good recovery. The use of at least 5 vials of antivenom reduces the incidence of serious complications.
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Old 02-19-2017, 04:29 AM
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It would seem (reading between the lines), that I have convinced MM of the wisdom of keeping a blaster available when in venomous snake habitat.

Cheezywan
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Old 02-19-2017, 07:56 AM
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My last post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheezywan View Post
It would seem (reading between the lines), that I have convinced MM of the wisdom of keeping a blaster available when in venomous snake habitat.

Cheezywan
A Commanche .45/.410 with rifling compensator and No. 6 shot. And ONLY if stepping back and avoiding him is not possible. ALWAYS when he is in MY habitat.

I am posting this series from my manuscript file into my blog, which is here:

http://realtimedata.wixsite.com/bullet-behaviour/about

You guys are welcome to subscribe and contribute. It still is in the beta version but accessible.

This is my last post on the forum.
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Old 02-19-2017, 10:34 AM
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Originally Posted by MusgraveMan View Post
A Commanche .45/.410 with rifling compensator and No. 6 shot. And ONLY if stepping back and avoiding him is not possible. ALWAYS when he is in MY habitat.

I am posting this series from my manuscript file into my blog, which is here:

http://realtimedata.wixsite.com/bullet-behaviour/about

You guys are welcome to subscribe and contribute. It still is in the beta version but accessible.

This is my last post on the forum.
Nothing to keep you from coming back but you. I have enjoyed the crossing of paths with you.
Black Mamba-wise , Bond Arms 10 gauge derringer. 3 inch barrel(s) chambered for 3.5 inch shells (open choke both barrels). We do agree on the #6 shot.

Cheezywan
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