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  #61  
Old 09-08-2016, 04:14 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BearBio View Post
I wonder if some of the respondents have ever hunted wild birds or, some of them have even read the OP. The poster wanted something that:

D. Not be outrageously heavy or bulky: not in the way of my shotgun but easily accessed, too.
My dog and I will be hunting chucker partridge.


The idea of carrying an extra long gun, along with bird vest, shells, water, birds (?), dog first aid kit, etc. is the very epitome of stupidity! If you have a spare hand, you usually need it for climbing! And the birds don't wait for you to say "ready, set, go!"

For those of you who're unfamiliar, chucker is a medium-small game bird that favors rocky and steep mountains and sagebrush. The steeper and rockier, the better they like it. They require little water. They were imported from southwest Asia (Pakistan and Afghanistan) in the 1960s and have made the intermountain west their home. They're now our premier game bird.
AND they taste like chicken.....
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  #62  
Old 09-08-2016, 05:40 AM
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Originally Posted by 91Carcano View Post
You nailed it!



I've never had one that chased deer. Anything else that would run, though. Tried a shock collar on one but he wouldn't break off chasing a bunny even with it set to the highest setting.
Never had porcupine quills; did have skunk!


Yes, you're right. I'm looking at the Garmin Alpha.
This dog was sired by a Chocolate Labrador and dammed by a German Shorthair Pointer.
Yup, another dammed GSP!
I've had several GSPs. My buddy used one for wild pigs. My brother's chased elk on us once. You forgot, they can be hard-headed unless you make them think it is their idea. My brother knew Bodo fairly well and was involved in NAVHDA when he lived near Grizzly Island (only place in the lower 48 with Alaskan emigrant mosquitoes!). My first one had a favorite ball==I once saw her chase a jack 400 yards and never drop that da-- ball!
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  #63  
Old 09-08-2016, 08:09 AM
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"make them think it's their idea"???

NO! You give a command, they do it without any thinking involved, IDEALY. One of Bodo's techniques was called force training. "Thinking about" or not obeying a command should not be an option. BTW Bodo used to train dogs for the Nazi's during WWll, so I guess they could be a little strict.
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  #64  
Old 09-08-2016, 01:09 PM
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There is a thinking amongst so called experts that you should not teach a dog anything till it is past six months old. Absolute rubbish. All of my dogs where taught their manners first, as soon as they arrived in my home. 8 weeks old and the puppy waited until I said OK before he could eat his food. I then make them sit and wait and so on. We have fun, don't get me wrong but the dog has to learn when it is fun time and when it is serious time. My dogs instinctively knew when. They also lived in with us as family just like kids and the training is very similar .... I could add wives to that but it might get me a thick lip :-) It is hard work with no let up, but by six months you should have a dog you can take anywhere without embarrassment BUT there are exceptions. STORY but TRUE. We lived in a small town at one time and my wife took our Labrador with her to do some shopping, as they walked down the street a lady came out from the florists that she knew and like women do they got chatting ...and chatting ...and chatting .. Muffin just could wait no longer for a lamp post and out of the corner of her eye my wife just saw the last couple of sprays go into the large bunch of flowers the lady had in her bag. She quickly broke the conversation and said goodbye. Funny that lady never spoke to her again :-)
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  #65  
Old 09-08-2016, 03:42 PM
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There is nothing hard about training a dog. It only takes about 15 minutes.

Every day.

For about six months.
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  #66  
Old 09-08-2016, 03:55 PM
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15 minutes a day?

Short daily training sessions are a great idea. Field training (in the field with live birds) takes longer than 15 minutes to set up. Dogs can be very smart so different techniques like getting a stranger to plant the live birds (pigeons in our case) or using a bicycle so as not to leave a scent trail may need to be used. Dogs can learn to simply follow your footsteps to the birds. A training table in your back yard is a great investment & will save your back & precious time. The daily 15 minutes a day on the table can really help master the basics. Some training does need to be done in the field though.
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  #67  
Old 09-09-2016, 04:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BearBio View Post
I wonder if some of the respondents have ever hunted wild birds or, some of them have even read the OP. The poster wanted something that:

D. Not be outrageously heavy or bulky: not in the way of my shotgun but easily accessed, too.
My dog and I will be hunting chucker partridge.


The idea of carrying an extra long gun, along with bird vest, shells, water, birds (?), dog first aid kit, etc. is the very epitome of stupidity! If you have a spare hand, you usually need it for climbing! And the birds don't wait for you to say "ready, set, go!"

For those of you who're unfamiliar, chucker is a medium-small game bird that favors rocky and steep mountains and sagebrush. The steeper and rockier, the better they like it. They require little water. They were imported from southwest Asia (Pakistan and Afghanistan) in the 1960s and have made the intermountain west their home. They're now our premier game bird.
It's obviously not practical to carry a 2nd long gun, (though there are over and under rifle/shotgun combos available).

It's even less practical to accept the premise that if "a pack of coyotes" is mauling your dog 200 yards away, that you are going to save him with a pistol, other than by the sound of the gunshot which can just as easily be made with the shotgun already in your hands.

I can and do frequently carry a pistol while shotgun hunting (with dogs), for targets of opportunity beyond shotgun range, but it's usefulness in the scenario upon which this thread is based is not something I would consider.
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  #68  
Old 09-09-2016, 09:22 AM
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The scenario envisaged could be solved with a couple of shots in the air from the shotgun BUT that dog needs to know it should heel without delay, no ifs no buts. I have never used a collar on my dogs and never ever beaten them, BUT one little trick I used to gets their attention works a treat. I had a young viszla which was eventually to be transferred to a professional friend who did not have the time to train the puppy. I agreed to have him for six months and he could come over and have fun with him so he became like an uncle or lets say a god father to the dog. The dog was pretty well steady for shooting and was a killing machine, pointing etc., and was about five months old, but our property ran alongside a busy small back road and he showed signs of wanting to chase these cars up the walkway of our wood. He couldn't get into the road because of a sheep fence but it needed stopping.
I took him round the wood for a walk with my other dogs and on the way I cut a real thin new growth 7ft nut wand and we walked slowly up the roadside track. I heard the car coming and saw him look back. As the car went by the dog set to take off after it, only to receive a very sharp stinging pain from the nut wand I had ready across his rear. No damage done and I reprimanded him very strongly. That dog never chased again. He would look back, then at me as if to say no, no I've learned my lesson. After that as with other dogs I have had who went through the same training, if they started to show signs of ignoring me or stepping out of line, I would simply reach up and break as small twig of the nearest tree. They amazingly appeared stuck to my legs:-) I suppose in a way the collars have the same effect if used properly. They should never feel that you have abused them and should revere your presence. I think the photo probably covers this.
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  #69  
Old 09-09-2016, 03:06 PM
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I'd save the weight of an additional firearm and simply stuff some high base 4, 5, or 6 shot shells in your pocket for your shotgun!

Nice pic, that is definitely chukar country!
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  #70  
Old 09-10-2016, 12:42 AM
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I got quickly and hopelessly addicted to chucker while living in South Dakota, oh, what a bird, that and pheasant actually. Dove hunting is fun, but it's more along the line of shooting clays for us. We live in very dove rich country, it's not at all unusual to limit out within a 1/2 hr, thus the reason why it resembles clay busting for us. Quail OTOH are an extremely challenging bird to hunt, even when doing so over good dogs. I don't care how much experience one may have, a covey of quail busting out from under your feet will send a flood of adrenaline through your body like no other bird.

Sorry for getting off topic, now back to the OP's issue.
I would think a good E collar jolt along with a whoa command should stop his dog in his / her tracks. I would stuff some #4 NP magnums in a light weight 18" SG, or bigger shot size even, but something that will confidently put it down. You could go with a handgun if preferred if you can shoot it well enough to nail a running coyote. But IME, a SG is much easier to make a quick and successful shot at something as fast and skittish as a yote. I don't know if you've ever tried to hit a coyote that's on the run, but it's more than just a little challenging with any firearm.

I don't know about anyone else, but I'm not willing to risk unintentionally shooting my dog, the E collar gives me the ability to focus on the coyote without having to worry about where my dog is when I pull the trigger.

SMOA
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  #71  
Old 09-10-2016, 01:33 PM
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"The .460 S&W x frame revolver is flat shooting and powerful. It is also scope ready. But it is very bulky and heavy for a pistol. Recoil is also going to be a little punishing. It's also a little overkill."

For pure distance the .460 hands down. Agree that it's bulky, I carry mine in a shoulder holster across my chest. It's an amazing handgun.
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  #72  
Old 09-10-2016, 01:55 PM
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Question Overcompensating for shortcomings or what?

Quote:
Originally Posted by dls56 View Post
"The .460 S&W x frame revolver is flat shooting and powerful. It is also scope ready. But it is very bulky and heavy for a pistol. Recoil is also going to be a little punishing. It's also a little overkill."

For pure distance the .460 hands down. Agree that it's bulky, I carry mine in a shoulder holster across my chest. It's an amazing handgun.
Maybe you could tote around a bag of cement & give those yotes cement overshoes.
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  #73  
Old 09-11-2016, 04:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nachogrande View Post
Maybe you could tote around a bag of cement & give those yotes cement overshoes.
Ha, been toting bags of concrete for over 40 years. Think they've been getting heavier lately somehow?
You could put a hurting on a yote with a .22 pistol, not exactly an ideal choice to put its lights out quick, but would be a deterrent.
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  #74  
Old 09-11-2016, 05:05 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nachogrande View Post
Maybe you could tote around a bag of cement & give those yotes cement overshoes.
My choice would still be my 10" Contender in 22 mag {pic on #27} because of the size and weight as compared to most of the other suggestions, you wouldn't even notice it in a daypack, ammunition is light as well.
Although as with everyone else that is serious about Chukar hunting this op is probably a masochist and would prefer to have a very difficult solution to the problem!!!
Not sure what kind of terrain they live in where he hunts but here they only live on the steepest rockiest nasty hillsides near timberline you can find, if your lucky enough to find them before your legs or heart gives out they might hold long enough for you to get firm footing before they launch themselves off the edge of the mountain at mach 4 so at least there easy to hit, no that's not right there **** near impossible to hit!!!
My forays into the mountains for birds is limited to an occasional turkey hunt or blue grouse hunt, while not on flat ground they are easily found at 7000 to 8000ft not far off "walking" trails not mountain climbing terrain!!
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  #75  
Old 09-18-2016, 08:54 PM
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I wouldn't use a revolver at all. A running coyote is hard to hit, and six shots would be a handicap. If you could limit your shots to within 100 yards, then a Glock 20 in 10mm would be ideal.
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  #76  
Old 01-05-2017, 07:58 PM
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I'm thinking that my Yote gun is going to be my T/C contender. I have either a .22 Hornet or a 7mm Int. R barrel for it. I've carried my 7R many times deer hunting. It is easy to put a sling on it, but you have to get a split ring to go around the barrel. I am thinking of going to a reflex sight on one or the other and see if I like it. Sometimes it is difficult to get the proper eye relief on the pistol scope. Especially when you have to shoot fairly quick.
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  #77  
Old 01-06-2017, 10:11 AM
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I'll stick with my S&W Model 48, it's a 22 WMR with a 6" barrel, works well for me.
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