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  #21  
Old 02-06-2017, 12:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBelk View Post
Steel is NOT a good material for cartridge cases and are only used in sloppy military arms. NO WAY would I use it in a nice rifle.
I agree, only time I've seen it work was in a Thompson the guy was to lazy to pick up brass (used a magnet).
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  #22  
Old 02-06-2017, 04:31 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSr View Post
The hardest part about reloading 7.62x39 is finding boxer primed brass. . .
Are you serious? Try Remington, Winchester, and PMC for a starter. There must be more but I've so far only bought these three brands and they were easily found.
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  #23  
Old 02-06-2017, 04:42 AM
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Originally Posted by Hanshi View Post
Long ago I came into a nice lot of steel cased .45acp military rounds. They eventually got all got fired and I started reloading them and still haven't lost one to splits or other damage. They are the preferred cases for my S&W M25-2.
Likely you are using carbide dies?
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  #24  
Old 02-06-2017, 06:11 AM
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for handgun rounds, it's feasible for at least one reload. I read an article a few years ago in Guns and Ammo about doing 45acp and 9mm rounds.

Author bought steel dies and used lots of lube when sizing them. He got good results, but a lot of steel cases have berden primers which rules those cases out.

for your 7.62x39, get brass cases and get a brass catcher for the bench or for the gun and save your cases from flying all over.
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  #25  
Old 02-06-2017, 07:59 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marshal Kane View Post
Are you serious? Try Remington, Winchester, and PMC for a starter. There must be more but I've so far only bought these three brands and they were easily found.
Here's the thing; I was merrily chugging along loading Winchester cases when all of a sudden, the primers wouldn't fit! You see, there were a few Remington cases in the bunch, and they used SMALL rifle primers, as opposed to the Winchester's large rifles! They DO come in both sizes!
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  #26  
Old 02-06-2017, 08:01 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hooknline View Post
Most steel cased ammo sold today is not corrosive. The only exception being mil surp stuff like found in the spam cans.
That's EXACTLY what I was referring to. You're not going to find non-corrosive commercial ammo, brass or steel, for 20 cents/round.

For the record, I think it's nuts to attempt to reload steel.
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  #27  
Old 02-06-2017, 10:32 AM
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Wear out your dies? Illogical. Modern pistol dies use carbide for the "toughest" part of reloading and the steel used in rifle dies are much harder than the soft steel of the steel cases (which is normally coated with a lacquer or zinc plating). The chambers of all my guns are cut in pretty hard, tough steel, much harder than steel cases. I've read studies of steel cased ammo vs. brass and "wearing out" anything faster than brass is a fallicy, the most failures comes with coatings clogging semi-autos after extended fast firing.

The drawback for steel cases is the properties of the metal versus the properties of brass; malleability, "spring back", work hardening/brittleness, etc. There is no reason to not try reloading a few to see what kind of results you get, real life experience not forum "facts"...

I have reloaded a very few steel cased rounds, but due to primers, Berdan vs. Boxer, not many. I'd try some 5.45x39, but no dies nor bullets are available...
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Last edited by mikld; 02-06-2017 at 10:36 AM.
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  #28  
Old 02-06-2017, 10:37 AM
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What he said goes for nickle plated brass cases too.

Cheezywan
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  #29  
Old 02-06-2017, 11:11 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by shawnbo View Post
That's EXACTLY what I was referring to. You're not going to find non-corrosive commercial ammo, brass or steel, for 20 cents/round.

For the record, I think it's nuts to attempt to reload steel.
Not to nitpick but neither of these are corrosive. I also realize shipping isn't included

7.62x39 Ammo 123gr FMJ Klimovsk Russian 1000 Round Case - AmmunitionStore.com. 0.21/Rd

Ammunitionstore.com - 223 5.56x45 Ammo 55gr FMJ Wolf WPA Military Classic for sale. Cheap ammo. Bulk ammo. .20/rd

I also wouldn't reload steel or shoot steel in a good rifle
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  #30  
Old 02-06-2017, 01:51 PM
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No problem - I have to be careful when talking prices, as I'm in Canada and our dollars are worth about 30 cents less than yours.

That Russian non-corrosive 7.62x39 is Berdan primed - good luck reloading that, boys!
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  #31  
Old 02-06-2017, 02:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikld View Post
the most failures comes with coatings clogging semi-autos after extended fast firing.
I'm sure that contributes to the Mosin Nagants' reputation for difficult extraction, as well. My 1938 example feeds and extracts lacquered steel almost as well as my commercial rifles work with brass. I have no qualms feeding it nothing but steel case 7.62x54R ammunition, either corrosive surplus or non-corrosive commercial. My SKS also sees nothing but steel case surplus cartridges.
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  #32  
Old 02-06-2017, 02:29 PM
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Nick Sizing? Don't know if it would work.

I wonder if some gadget could be made to neck size steel cases. Wonder if something on the order of a Lee Collet die could be made up. I don't have any idea of the "spring back." Thinking of conventional reloading gear my be an obstacle. How about bushing dies? Just a thought. We may need this knowledge some day.
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  #33  
Old 02-06-2017, 07:23 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marshal Kane View Post
Are you serious? Try Remington, Winchester, and PMC for a starter. There must be more but I've so far only bought these three brands and they were easily found.
Yes I'm serious, but I'm also too cheap to pay 3 or 4 times as much for 7.62x39 ammo so that I can reload it, and for reason, I've never know anybody else to buy it either, and never found any left behind. You are the first!
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  #34  
Old 02-06-2017, 07:28 PM
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Originally Posted by mikld View Post
Wear out your dies? Illogical. Modern pistol dies use carbide for the "toughest" part of reloading and the steel used in rifle dies are much harder than the soft steel of the steel cases (which is normally coated with a lacquer or zinc plating). The chambers of all my guns are cut in pretty hard, tough steel, much harder than steel cases. I've read studies of steel cased ammo vs. brass and "wearing out" anything faster than brass is a fallicy, the most failures comes with coatings clogging semi-autos after extended fast firing.

The drawback for steel cases is the properties of the metal versus the properties of brass; malleability, "spring back", work hardening/brittleness, etc. There is no reason to not try reloading a few to see what kind of results you get, real life experience not forum "facts"...

I have reloaded a very few steel cased rounds, but due to primers, Berdan vs. Boxer, not many. I'd try some 5.45x39, but no dies nor bullets are available...
I've heard the same thing about nickel plated cases, and I've spent at least 30 years trying to destroy my carbide Lyman 38/357 dies, but have so far been unsuccessful.
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  #35  
Old 02-07-2017, 03:09 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheezywan View Post
JonP is the dude.Seek him and Hanshi out for steel case reload data. Probably best to use PM to exchange data so as to get the most from it.

Cheezywan

EDIT: You CAN reload steel cases. You CAN stand up in a hammock. Need to want to though.
I didn't say I did it much but I have just to try it. Me, steel case is cheap blasting fodder and brass is for multiple reloads. I see no need to reload steel but it can be done and safely which is what the op was asking I think? Can it be done? Sure can. Should it be done short of the Zombie Apocalypse when cheap brass can be had? No reason I can see unless your like me and just want to try it to see if it can be done.

As for the "ever see a steel case explode in a chamber (sic)" Ever see a brass round explode in a chamber or barrel? Both will wreck a gun.

BTW Cheezywan: if you can stand up in a hammock your a better man than I Gunga Din! I have tried log rolling though.

Last edited by JonP; 02-07-2017 at 03:14 PM.
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  #36  
Old 02-07-2017, 03:12 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mikld View Post
Wear out your dies? Illogical. Modern pistol dies use carbide for the "toughest" part of reloading and the steel used in rifle dies are much harder than the soft steel of the steel cases (which is normally coated with a lacquer or zinc plating). The chambers of all my guns are cut in pretty hard, tough steel, much harder than steel cases. I've read studies of steel cased ammo vs. brass and "wearing out" anything faster than brass is a fallicy, the most failures comes with coatings clogging semi-autos after extended fast firing.

The drawback for steel cases is the properties of the metal versus the properties of brass; malleability, "spring back", work hardening/brittleness, etc. There is no reason to not try reloading a few to see what kind of results you get, real life experience not forum "facts"...

I have reloaded a very few steel cased rounds, but due to primers, Berdan vs. Boxer, not many. I'd try some 5.45x39, but no dies nor bullets are available...
The times I have reloaded steel I found them to wear out in fewer reloads than brass but that may have been a function of the loads, the gun etc. That steel will wear out dies is a silly notion as the steel used is of a milder type than the dies and all the modern steel case I've seen is non corrosive.

Last edited by JonP; 02-07-2017 at 03:15 PM.
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  #37  
Old 02-08-2017, 04:15 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bong Son Buck View Post
Here's the thing; I was merrily chugging along loading Winchester cases when all of a sudden, the primers wouldn't fit! You see, there were a few Remington cases in the bunch, and they used SMALL rifle primers, as opposed to the Winchester's large rifles! They DO come in both sizes!
Yes, that's true and why I won't buy more 7.62x39 Remington brass until they change to LRP. I segregate my brass so I know when to use SRPs. I read somewhere that Remington is planning to make the change but I have so much Winchester brass that I haven't followed up on this. If anyone has 7.62x39 Remington brass with LR primer pockets, I would appreciate letting us know.

Added note: I believe Blazer makes .45 ACP brass with SP primer pockets also.
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  #38  
Old 02-08-2017, 04:28 AM
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Originally Posted by mikld View Post
Wear out your dies? Illogical. Modern pistol dies use carbide for the "toughest" part of reloading and the steel used in rifle dies are much harder than the soft steel of the steel cases (which is normally coated with a lacquer or zinc plating). . .
Yes, modern pistol dies use carbide but not many rifle dies come in carbide and those that do are pretty expensive. You might not have problems resizing steel rifle cases due to the tapered body of those cases. Where there might be a problem is the straight walled case neck which is usually left dry. Any damage to your die will likely show up there first.
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  #39  
Old 02-08-2017, 04:42 AM
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An Experient-resize the cases right now and make um' fireable

An experiment-for the Skeptics : How about somebody with the gear make up and shoot some steel case reloads. Show us how it is done. Show us the results. My take on it is when the push comes to shove it's possible to reload those cases. It would be great to prove this thing one way or another. What we did last month or last year does not count. When finished forward a box of twenty to the naysayers.
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  #40  
Old 02-08-2017, 04:49 AM
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Case in a firearm acts as a gasket (aside from being a self-contained cartridge container). Brass is simply a superior material for the job. Steels only real attribute is cheap. Use it once, and pitch it. Sorta similar to an engine in a torpedo. Nobody has a job re-building torpedo engines. Intended to run like he-ll once.

Cheezywan
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