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  #1  
Old 04-06-2017, 11:23 AM
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It's that time of year again


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...... big day thinning poplars again this week and orders flowing in from customers wanting to replenish stocks. This little pile is about half of what we have down and about 40 more trees to come down before the leaves break. They are cut at 30 inches, we split them full length and stack them on frames and then cut them into 10 inch logs, which about average of what customers like.
A number of the trees are now big enough to slab up and I am hoping I have found a mill where I can get this done for a small exchange of crinkly paper Should make some useful timber in 12ft lengths which I can then size and plane myself as required.
That little 17hp Kubota 7001 was made in 1977 and still runs like a Swiss watch and on a sniff of commercial diesel.
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Old 04-06-2017, 12:06 PM
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I didn't know you had a poplar farm, Sus. Great picture and great work.
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Old 04-06-2017, 12:19 PM
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Beautiful land.
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Old 04-06-2017, 01:14 PM
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Note the very high tech counter balance weight hanging on the hydraulic arms. That took a lot of brain power to design and build
Old plastic spray drum. Piece of 3/4 rod through and drilled for pins either end, through two very precisely drilled holes then filled with concrete/bricks/rubble. Weighs about 1 1/2 cwt(170lbs)
Just manages to stop the old Kubota standing on it's nose when the forks are full of logs.
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Old 04-06-2017, 07:23 PM
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I love little tractors, I have a little toy Deere to mow and aerate the lawn.
What do people use poplar for in the UK? They look alot like my Aspens.


Last edited by Kevinbear; 04-06-2017 at 09:22 PM.
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Old 04-06-2017, 11:00 PM
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At the moment Kevin I sell it as logs, as it burns well when dry and doesn't 'spit' on the open fire. However as mentioned, some of the trees are now getting large enough to slab up and use as timber for projects. It has similar strengths and working traits as pine. I built a lean to log store last year with it and given a good coat of preservative it will last. As you probably saw I have also built a couple of high seats with it as well. In addition I built a small raised cabin with slabs two inches thick, just as a place to sit and observe wildlife and kill any verminous stuff in the wood.
Aspen is more like our silver birch. These poplar are clones and bred to produce long straight timber easy to process, either as logs, chips or slab timber. I have seen some very attractive furniture made from it.
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Old 04-07-2017, 02:00 AM
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I used poplar to construct the drawer of the chess table I made a few years back. It's straight, light-weight and while it's not as strong as most other hardwoods, the grain is very clear, making it desirable for certain presentation aspects of furniture making.

One interesting thing about managing poplar stands is that the entire stand is a single living organism. When managed for wildlife, one method is to harvest all trees in the stand during mid to late winter, when most of the energy is stored in the root structure. The following spring you'll have a uniform stand of poplar shoots. Another method is to drop a few trees late each year, but before the leaves drop; deer will focus on these for a short time.
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Old 04-07-2017, 05:05 AM
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Sus could you post the dimensions of your poplar stand. Height and base dimensions.They would be ideal for our camp which due to terrain and heavy logging has limited numbers of trees for hanging a ladder stand
thanks
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Old 04-07-2017, 08:41 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sus Scrofa View Post
At the moment Kevin I sell it as logs, as it burns well when dry and doesn't 'spit' on the open fire.
I can not speak for UK Popular. But if you burn Georgia Popular on a fireplace you better have a good small mesh fire screen. It pops and sparkles violently just like lighting struck trees will. On a camp fire when it gets to burning really well it will pop throwing red hot coals in your lap or sleeping bag.
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Old 04-07-2017, 09:14 AM
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shooting50, obviously a different specie to ours. Now willow over here spits and sparks with the best, but is superb wood to heat a room in a closed face log burner once dry.

dogdoc, give me a day or so and I will draw up some basic plans. It all varies a little according to how high wide etc. but the basics are the same. I have two styles I make. The one in the picture above and this one. You might be able to glean some idea of measurements from the photos. The uprights are usually 4x4 inches thereabouts considering they are cut with a chain saw.
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Old 04-08-2017, 02:21 AM
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Carpentry with a chainsaw. Some skill involved there. Reminds me of watching the SeaBees build some quarters in Bosnia years ago.
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Old 04-08-2017, 05:05 AM
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No prob Sus I think I can go by your pics. Planning to use 16ft PT 4x4 as legs with width of 36in and spread of 5ft at base front to back, should put top angle at about 15.5 ft. Will use some heavy strap hinges at top so it is adjustable if needed to stabilize and maybe even allow to be collapsed for transport.
thanks
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Old 04-08-2017, 07:02 AM
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Yes, some good strong bolted on strap hinges is a great idea. The cross members could also be bolted so easily distmant'd and folded like a giant set of step ladders. You might want to take the spread to 6ft or even a touch more for best stability, the height loss will be minimal and if you are not going to have a spread top to bottom on the stair side then either some stabilizing wires or drive a couple of tantalised posts in either side, again to stabilise .... if it tips over you might bend the barrel on your rifle ...wouldn't want that to happen. If you have any idea at all it is pretty simple and adaptable. I find the wider seating arrangement allows me to ease around at different angles without straining.
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Old 04-08-2017, 08:52 AM
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tree farms

I have 600 acres of second growt h tree farm, the pine was logged in 1926 so I have only a few acres of virgin. my brothers have another 1100 acres like mine and my older sawmill has 36" blade powered by Cummins 325 diesel. I can cut a 24" board up to 25 feet long. The snow broke the roof on my old mill , my son bought a new band saw, called Timber King. We can pull it behind a big pickup. (don't call it "portable" since there is no shoulder strap!!). come on, smile. My family has been involved in sawmills, logging and timber since 1880. A crude "no longer allowed" joke in the canyon used to be (Grandad got the indians all shot off, Dad got the pine all logged off , and now Jack is getting the elk all shot off !!!)

Lot of new snow this morning, slow and great big flakes, almost 5" since breakfast and no turkeys this morning. And I thought Spring had sprung.
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Old 04-08-2017, 09:17 AM
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How long to drive across to the UK and slab some of my incy winsy poplars then

There is only ten acres here but I am sure you appreciate just how enjoyable sitting in a patch of woodland can be. Keep still be patient and the whole place comes alive. I wish I was 20yrs younger and I would be inviting myself over just to sit and watch and listen to your trees. Sat for 30 minutes this afternoon in ours. It is a beautiful spring afternoon. Birds are all in their best clothes and building nests, bumble bees buzzing by .... how do those things manage to fly ??? .... I did have to give a Queen wasp(yellow jacket0 a quick squirt of kill spray to deter her building in my cabin. Why would anyone choose to live in a city ?
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Old 04-12-2017, 01:31 PM
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""It has similar strengths and working traits as pine. I built a lean to log store last year with it and given a good coat of preservative it will last.""
Copied frop orig post--

I know a fellow that decided to fence his property w/ aspen posts. A friend told him "better hurry and get the posts in or they will be rotted off."

Around here aspen/popular dont last when in contact w/ the soil.

We moved here from 250 mi S. Home had a nice fireplace and came w/ chainsaw. Wife and I went out to cut firewood w/ state permit. I picked a nice tree leaning 3-4' off the ground. I thought it cut easy. Was rotted popular.
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Old 04-13-2017, 06:54 AM
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Yep, absolutely. It has a limited life. I was told that 25yrs standing, then cut and re plant. Actually my little patch is regenerating so fast with other trees, ash, oak, maple, cherry, walnut, chestnut, in between the poplars that I will probably harvest all of the poplar and use it for relatively short term above ground jobs, like the high seats (I sit the legs of those on pieces of concrete slab to keep off the soil) and my cabin which is sat on four legs made from the pressure treated pine telegraph poles. It should see me out that's for sure and the logs will also keep us warm until that time.
We would not think of putting anything in the ground here unless it had be tanalised pressure treated... 25 year min life span.

Last edited by Sus Scrofa; 04-13-2017 at 06:56 AM.
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Old 04-16-2017, 06:11 AM
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Nice job with the counter-weight.

I picked up a Carryall and use it on the 3-point. It works well to balance the loads and I cut my trips in half. It's rated to 800 lbs.

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Old 04-16-2017, 02:46 PM
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I like "listening to the trees", as well. I've got 42 sawtooth oak, 21 Chinese chestnut and about 15 dwarf chinkapin oak growing on the back deck this spring. With luck, most of them will do well until planted on the hunting properties this fall. I'm already planning on a bunch of northern red oak for next year. Growing trees from nuts is a little crazy in this day and age, but I rather enjoy it.

Hopefully I'll be fortunate enough to be harvesting from them in the future, as you are today. Very inspiring stuff.
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Old 04-16-2017, 10:23 PM
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broom, I have about ten English oak growing in the wood where I just kicked the soil and planted an acorn from an old tree on a shooting lease I had. I also have seven red oaks growing from acorns I snook back from Maine about 18yrs ago, and they are now about 12ft high and a picture in the autumn. Yes, your right, it is enjoyable and very satisfying. Have some more thinning to do this morning before the sap really rises.
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