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  #1  
Old 12-27-2016, 04:12 PM
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Hello all,

I am new to this forum. I live in Texas and never really hunted consistently and rarely used a scope. Now I'm trying to get more into it and get a decent rifle setup. A couple years ago I got a .270 mossberg. It came with a barska scope. I've read some not so flattering things about this scope. I really am such a newbie that I couldn't discern what makes it crappy. It's hard for me to sight it in but that could be my being green. My questions are- is there an article y'all would recommend to get some of the basics to hunting optics down? And also- if I wind up buying a scope, is it easy to remount to scope on a different gun if I switch to a .308? Thanks for having me

Ryan
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  #2  
Old 12-27-2016, 04:45 PM
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Welcome Rtylr06, here's a good link to rifle scope basics from a pretty good supplier of all things optical. It's a decent read for the beginner and should offer some good advice. To answer your question about removing and remounting a scope. Yes, it's pretty easy to do if you know the basics of mounting scopes. Google Leupold and they have two really good on line tutorials on how to mount a scope. It's not that hard, you just need to know the basics. Hope this helps.
Rifle Scopes 101: Ultimate Guide Choosing Your Scope
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  #3  
Old 12-27-2016, 05:12 PM
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Thank you!
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  #4  
Old 12-27-2016, 06:33 PM
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Ok so it looks like for my hunting purposes a 4-12 focus is plenty. I will have a budget around $200-250. Leupold and vortex seem to be everyone's favorite. Is there one I should be looking at specifically? I will be hunting deer and hogs mostly and using a .270 for now. 200 yd being a long shot
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  #5  
Old 12-27-2016, 06:47 PM
nsb nsb is offline
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They are both good scopes. I prefer Leupold, but that's just a personal preference. I don't think you'll need a 4-12 if you don't anticipate shooting game that sized at no more than 200 yds. For deer and hogs a 2-7 or 3-9 would probably be a good choice. Nothing wrong with the 4-12 though. Just select one of those brands that will fit in to your budget.
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  #6  
Old 12-27-2016, 07:24 PM
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Don't get hung-up on power, I shoot a 14x to a mile. Unless you spend $3,000-ish dollars, higher magnification simply magnifies a blurry view.

Here are some "been there, done that" words, do anything you wish with them.
For a brand new to scopes guy, "Crappy" means that they don't hold zero well. Bounce it getting in or out of the truck, leave it in the corner for a month, anything that constitutes normal use, and it may not be zeroed anymore.
Jumping to some universal standards:

Eye relief: This is important. A scope with little eye relief, or one that changes the amount greatly as you zoom in or out, is going to hit your eye one day; only a matter of time, so don't put up with it.
Tracking: most people don't know and don't want to know anything about scopes. For them tracking means adjusting a new scope and some minor adjustments with different ammo. If your scope doesn't track properly, then the adjustments you make are off a bit, and typically "float" from what you adjusted. So if you needed to adjust 1/2" right for zero, but it moved 3/4". Then after a few shots, even if you don't adjust again, it actually seems as though you adjustef another amount. Don't put up with this.
Warranty:
This is the eternal argument on forums. Here is the truth, they ARE NOT FREE, No exceptions. YOU pay up-front for a calculated number of replacements, and the company is banking on the fact that you paid for more than they have to replace. This doesn't mean that a scope is good, or bad inherently. Just don't fall into the trap of a warranty meaning something is "better" or "worth it". By the way, never use those two terms I quoted, unless you are giving your personal view. I personally want to use my money as I see fit, and not give it to a company betting against me for replacement. No view is "wrong", it's just a different view.

Coatings/Glass/Jesus:
90% of all reviewers don't know shyte about this, in terms of relative values. Quite frankly, 90% of shooters won't matter anyway.
Read a few of my reviews and you'll understand. When I reviewed the SWFA 3-15 HD Vs the Primary Arms 4-14, we saw it. The $750 SWFA is brighter without a doubt. But start shooting to a mile and try target acquisition that far, suddenly the $229 Primary flat embarrassed it. Most shooters think a blessing and Jesus is needed to shoot a mile, not true at all. Most think that the $750 scope is world's better than the $229. Well, if 500 yards is a long way to you, and bright is better than accurate, and a moving eye relief is fine; then I guess I understand why you chose the SWFA. If you value the ability to see targets even if they are dimmer, then you better buy the PA.


If you want to shoot a box or maybe 3 a year, then honestly it doesn't much matter. If you want a good scope you can grow with, don't buy a off name on the super-cheap. If this second route is the one you are on, buy a FFP, or First Focal Plane scope, such as the PA, SWFA, or a Weaver Tactical. Ignore ANYONE who tells you to use a BDC, or that FFP is any of the following: Hard, confusing, not needed, only for tactical use.

All just choices and trade-offs my friend, nothing is on a pedestal when you are talking about preferences.
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Last edited by Darkker; 12-27-2016 at 07:32 PM.
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  #7  
Old 12-27-2016, 08:37 PM
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Rtylr06 - For variables, 3x9 is kind of the standard do it all scope. One thing you need to know, a lot of experienced hunters keep their scope on the lowest power in the field. You need that if something happens quick because the low power settings give you a wider field of view. If you see something out there you need to shoot at 300 yards, you can do it on 3x power no problem. If you have time, you can crank it up to 9x and really zero in. The reverse is not true. If an animal is up close and moving in the brush and you're set on 9x, chances are you won't even be able to find it in the scope. If you think you are going to hunt in very thick brush and possibly at moving targets, 2x7 is the way to go. Conversely if you anticipate 300-400 yd shots, a good 4-12 or 4.5-14 is handy. As someone said though, at the price point you are looking at, things may get a little fuzzy at 12 or 14 power. I have a 4x12 Vortex and a 4.5x14 Burris in that price point range and both lose sharpness at max power. They are flawless at 10x and below though, which is why I suggest you just get a basic 3x9.

Of the brands you mentioned, Leupold and Vortex, me experience says go with Leupold. Their eye relief, both in terms of distance from eye to scope and forgiveness in lateral movement is clearly superior IMO (vs a Vortex and most other brands at a given price point).

In the $150-$225 range, I have also had good luck with Nikon Prostaff and Burris Fullfield 3x9x40 scopes. Both would be a serious step up from that Baraska.

Make sure you know how to get your bases on securely, the rings onto the bases securely, and the scope/rings properly aligned. Very many beginners get these simple steps wrong and sometimes even damage their scope.
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  #8  
Old 12-28-2016, 04:43 AM
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I'm in alignment with those recommending scopes of 2-7, 2-8, 3-9 or similar. For hunting deer and hogs I determine which scope for which rifle by figuring the optimum low power, which impacts your largest field of view (FOV) for closer range shots rather then looking at the highest magnification I can get. Most any experienced hunter will have a story about having too much magnification on a short range shot (myself included)

At your chosen price break your thoughts on Leupold and Vortex are spot on. Some others also mentioned as good choices would be Nikon and Burris. My experiences have me preferring Leupold and Vortex however. I like 2x as a good low end on a scope for deer and hogs and actually have several rifles used for deer and hogs that wear 1-4 scopes and they will work fine to 200 yards as well.

I'd take some time online and look for the lowest price you can find for a Leupold VX2 in 2-733 and be very happy if you can find one for $250. It will work great for as long as you hunt with that rifle.

ADDED: I just spent 5 mins looking and found the VX2 in 2-733 for $257.50 delivered. Buy the standard duplex reticle.
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Last edited by Tnhunter; 12-28-2016 at 04:48 AM.
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  #9  
Old 12-28-2016, 05:27 AM
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Rtylr06 - I agree with everything TN said and a VX-2 in either 3x9x40 or 2x7x33 are the standard by which others are measured. One other thing to consider. If you like simplicity there is nothing wrong with fixed power scopes. These are not adjustable for magnification. A Leupold FX-2 in 4x33 is just a 4 power scope with no bells and whistles. That simplicity comes with some advantages though. 1) There are fewer lens and internal parts so fewer things to break if dropped or banged on something. 2) There are fewer lens and internal parts so less light gets bled away as the image goes through the scope to your eyes. In other words, fixed scopes tend to be a little brighter at dusk and dawn than their variable counterparts. For shooting big game out to 450 yards or so, a 4x scope is all you'll need with your .270.
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  #10  
Old 12-28-2016, 05:45 AM
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Around here we have a Leupold repair center within 150 miles and many have this brand because of this.The quick turn around time is impressive.I have owned most major makes and some I just try...because.I purchased a Redfield rampage spotting scope and it fell apart and a Nikon spotting scope and it fell apart. I had owned both makes before and they were excellent. I am fairly hard on my gear however. Presently have Minox,swarovski,leupolds,B&L ,bushnell and plenty of others. Much of our gear has turned into a fashion show,imo.Try your rifle and scope combo in tough conditions and see how it holds up,you might find the rifle is just fine for what you do.
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  #11  
Old 12-28-2016, 05:56 AM
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Thanks for all the help guys. This is great. I'll check out the leupold. I've gotta get it going. Just tried to sight in my rifle and ran out of shells before I got it. Had it bore sighted a month ago and was tinkering with it 5 days ago trying to get it more accurately sighted. Then today I couldn't get on paper
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  #12  
Old 12-28-2016, 06:05 AM
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I've sent you a PM with a couple of links. Good Luck!
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  #13  
Old 12-28-2016, 09:52 AM
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Originally Posted by Rtylr06 View Post
Thanks for all the help guys. This is great. I'll check out the leupold. I've gotta get it going. Just tried to sight in my rifle and ran out of shells before I got it. Had it bore sighted a month ago and was tinkering with it 5 days ago trying to get it more accurately sighted. Then today I couldn't get on paper
Check the snugness of those bases and rings. You'll burn a lot of powder for naught if those are right.
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  #14  
Old 12-28-2016, 02:51 PM
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There is a lot of good info here.

The Scope, Sights, & Mounts Super-Sticky (questions? try here!) - RimfireCentral.com Forums
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  #15  
Old 12-29-2016, 02:05 PM
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Ok sorry for the million questions. Last one for a while...I'm trying to bore sight this stupid thing again.. Using a borrowed laser sight. Do I need to account for the drop in the laser not fitting securely in the barrel? I have it centered left to right but it's high . Wondering if I should bother hunting tomorrow. Hunting season is dwindling down for deer and I don't want to miss the few chances I get

Last edited by Rtylr06; 12-29-2016 at 02:07 PM.
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  #16  
Old 12-29-2016, 02:06 PM
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Check the snugness of those bases and rings. You'll burn a lot of powder for naught if those are right.
Thanks. Checked and they're tight
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  #17  
Old 12-29-2016, 03:36 PM
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OK you should probably give up on the laser. If they aren't tight in the bore, there is no telling where they will point. Just pull the bolt and look through the bore at a distant object that is fairly distinct.
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  #18  
Old 12-29-2016, 04:16 PM
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OK Rtylr,

You say you are good left and right now. How high are you shooting? if it's within 12 inches, you are in the ball park and should be able to get zero'd. If your scope has 1/2" adjustments per click, you'll need to move down 2 clicks for each inch you are high (so 24 clicks for 12"). If your scope has 1/4" click adjustments, it's 4 clicks down for each inch high (48 clicks for 12 inches).

Incidentally, a lot of hunters sight a flat shooting rifle like yours in an inch or two inches high at 100 yards. This gives you a simplified firing solution out to about 325 yards by aiming at the center of the chest cavity on a deer. In other words, with a .270 and 130 grain bullets, zero'd 1.5 inches high at 100 yards, you can just aim center mass of the chest cavity out to 300 yards and you'll be in the vitals. That's if it isn't real windy! :-)

Do you understand what MikeG said? You don't need a laser to boresight a bolt action rifle. You place the gun on a solid rest and take the bolt out. Look through the barrel at a white piece of paper or orange target or something like that say 35-50 yds away. Then without moving the gun (that's important), look through your scope. It should be set on lowest power probably. If you say you are hitting high now. That means that when looking through the barrel at that piece of paper, when you look at it through the scope, the crosshairs will be below that piece of paper. This makes sense because if your crosshairs were on the piece of paper, when you look though the barrel, that view will be high (above the paper). That's why you are hitting high. Again, if you are within 12" or so and your left and right is good, I'd just crank the elevation adjustment down some and you will see that gap close. The D, U, L, and R on your scope is for the point of impact (POI) - the direction you want it to move.

If you can't get the POI on the bullseye before you run out of clicks on the scope, you have a base/ring alignment problem. I doubt that though since you were previously zero'd.
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Last edited by Bird Dog II; 12-29-2016 at 04:21 PM.
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  #19  
Old 12-29-2016, 04:43 PM
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Originally Posted by Bird Dog II View Post
OK Rtylr,

You say you are good left and right now. How high are you shooting? if it's within 12 inches, you are in the ball park and should be able to get zero'd. If your scope has 1/2" adjustments per click, you'll need to move down 2 clicks for each inch you are high (so 24 clicks for 12"). If your scope has 1/4" click adjustments, it's 4 clicks down for each inch high (48 clicks for 12 inches).

Incidentally, a lot of hunters sight a flat shooting rifle like yours in an inch or two inches high at 100 yards. This gives you a simplified firing solution out to about 325 yards by aiming at the center of the chest cavity on a deer. In other words, with a .270 and 130 grain bullets, zero'd 1.5 inches high at 100 yards, you can just aim center mass of the chest cavity out to 300 yards and you'll be in the vitals. That's if it isn't real windy! :-)

Do you understand what MikeG said? You don't need a laser to boresight a bolt action rifle. You place the gun on a solid rest and take the bolt out. Look through the barrel at a white piece of paper or orange target or something like that say 35-50 yds away. Then without moving the gun (that's important), look through your scope. It should be set on lowest power probably. If you say you are hitting high now. That means that when looking through the barrel at that piece of paper, when you look at it through the scope, the crosshairs will be below that piece of paper. This makes sense because if your crosshairs were on the piece of paper, when you look though the barrel, that view will be high (above the paper). That's why you are hitting high. Again, if you are within 12" or so and your left and right is good, I'd just crank the elevation adjustment down some and you will see that gap close. The D, U, L, and R on your scope is for the point of impact (POI) - the direction you want it to move.

If you can't get the POI on the bullseye before you run out of clicks on the scope, you have a base/ring alignment problem. I doubt that though since you were previously zero'd.

Ok that's good info to have. It's lined up with the crosshairs being high. Definitely within 12 inches though. Looks about 3-4 inches too high. Of course I won't know exactly until I shoot it
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Old 12-29-2016, 06:52 PM
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Ok going in the morning to get a leupold vx 2 at academy(I have gift cards). I'm pretty excited now. Thank you all for these helpful tips. This is a solid forum
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