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  #1  
Old 05-18-2017, 06:47 AM
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Why should you not dry fire a .22 gun


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Hello,

I was wondering why it is not a good idea to dry fire a .22 caliber weapon handgun/rifle? Does it have something to do with the firing pin inside the weapon?

Thanks,
Rich
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Old 05-18-2017, 06:55 AM
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I've seen instances where the firing pin would travel far enough to pein the chamber wall when dry fired. Most rimfires of a good design don't do that. Not knowing which ones will and which ones won't, I don't make a practice of dry firing them.
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Old 05-18-2017, 07:14 AM
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Depends on the gun. Get an owner's manual to know for SURE.

As an example, you have to dry-fire a Ruger .22 auto to disassemble it. It says so in the manual.

Some guns have firing pins long enough to peen the chamber if you dry fire them.
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Old 05-18-2017, 08:09 AM
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Pecking the back of the chamber to cast up a burr is #1. The other is firing pin stresses. The cross-pins that normally hold firing pins in the gun are not supposed to take banging by the firing pin. The pin should be 'cushioned' with a brass case when ever possible.
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Old 05-18-2017, 11:30 AM
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This is sorta related
https://www.shootersforum.com/rimfir...-practice.html
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Old 05-18-2017, 04:03 PM
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If you want to dry fire a 22 even ones that won't peen the chamber face save spent rounds in the pocket of your shooting vest, get a half dozen Q-tips from your wife and cut both ends off saving the last 1/2 inch, insert one in the case you plan to dry fire with it will prevent the dry priming material from littering the barrel of your gun when it's dislodged by repeated firings.
I get 10 dry fires from a spent case when practicing, pull out the Q-tip and insert in a "new" spent case and start over, I don't bother rotating the case because they get difficult to close the bolt on, during shooting season I literally dry fire my Anschutz thousands of times a month. Having the gun clean and lubricated will minimize wear.
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Old 05-19-2017, 02:39 PM
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To give you an idea of how bad it can get, at a shop I worked at, we had a used Ruger Mark II that had been dry fired so much that the top of the chamber was so seriously peened that it was difficult to get a cartridge to go into the chamber, and it would scratch the case each time.
It wasn't a tough fix, though. The shop had a relationship with a gunsmith that owned a .22 LR chamber reamer, which made short work of the burr.
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Old 05-21-2017, 08:25 AM
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I believe it's because manufacturer's need to sell snap caps. I've never had a problem dry firing anything!
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Old 05-21-2017, 09:24 AM
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No trouble in the "doing part" Don. Is sometimes the consequences there of that will bite you.
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Old 05-21-2017, 09:38 AM
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Dry firing SOME guns wears less than shooting them, but SOME guns are damaged more by dry firing than going swimming or going through a house fire.

Why not obey the Tenth Commandment as religiously as the First?

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10TH COMMANDMENT OF FIREARM SAFETY
Learn the mechanical and handling characteristics of the firearm you are using.

Not all guns are alike. They have different mechanical characteristics that dictate how you should carry and handle them. Anyone who plans to use a firearm should first become totally familiar with the type of firearm it is and the safe handling procedures for loading, unloading, carrying, shooting and storing it.
The last improvement made the Mauser Model 98 was a change in the firing pin to prevent out of battery firing due to firing pin breakage due to dry firing. That was in 1903.

Unless you know how the gun works and know it's ok, don't dry fire! As a kid, I glued pencil erasers into primer pockets for snap caps.....that was after a SMLE firing pin broke my bedroom mirror.
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Last edited by JBelk; 05-21-2017 at 09:49 AM.
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Old 05-21-2017, 10:06 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeG View Post
Depends on the gun. Get an owner's manual to know for SURE.

As an example, you have to dry-fire a Ruger .22 auto to disassemble it. It says so in the manual.

Some guns have firing pins long enough to peen the chamber if you dry fire them.
Re-assembly is very important with the Ruger rimfire pistols for all the reasons outlined above.

The Ruger .22 Mk I, II and III pistols have a firing pin that will put a significant dent in the barrel face - enough to prevent chambering the next round, after just one strike from the firing pin.

What prevents this is the little cross pin in the bolt that serves as a firing pin stop, to prevent it from actually contacting the barrel face. Unfortunately that little cross pin can get left out, or fall out while the bolt is being handled before or as it is being re-inserted in the receiver.

If it gets left out, the first time you dry fire it, you'll damage the barrel face. Ruger regards the barrel and recover together as the "receiver" and thus doesn't do barrel replacements. You can buy an "iron" that is used to press the displaced metal back into place, but it's not ideal and you would not want to do this more than once.

Consequently, the last thing a Ruger Mk I,II,III owner should be doing when inserting the bolt into the receiver is visually ensuring the pin is in place.
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Old 05-25-2017, 05:32 PM
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Myself none of my guns get dry firing at anytime.
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  #13  
Old 05-25-2017, 05:44 PM
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I don't risk it with RF's, had a negative experience with one. Never had anything happen with my CF guns and I've dry fired the living day lights out of them. I do use snap caps from time to time, especially when I'm sitting around the living room dry firing one of the revolver's. The sound of the hammer dropping on an empty cylinder really irritates my wife, so I fill the holes with snap caps to deaden the noise.

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Old 06-04-2017, 03:37 AM
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I have owned many Rugers and always relieve the spring pressure and never harmed one. Bolt guns are easy, just hold the trigger as you close the bolt.
The worst to dry fire are the Marlin lever guns, you can break the firing pin with just one dry fire but now the new ones with the cross bolt safety can be dry fired with the safety on.
Many older .22 rifles would get damaged.
The guns to watch are the SKS, etc if you load for them. The primers we use are not military tough so chambering a round will fire them. I machine the pins for a spring.
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