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Brownells has a YouTube video series called “Smyth Busters,” in which they discuss gunsmith myths… and this time, it’s about lubrication in AR-style rifles, also known as MSRs.

Do you need to lubricate the bolt carrier assembly? If so, where do you put the oil? If not, why not?

Old dog Steve Ostrem and young gun Caleb Savant team up to talk about just that, and to discuss the absolutely wrong (but different) instructions they each received in the US Army.

In short: Don’t put oil in combustion areas or vent holes. Do put it on wear areas — even on coated BCGs.

Agree? Disagree? Let us know what works for you. Meanwhile, check out the video.


The post ‘Smith Myth Busted: Do You Really Need to Lubricate an AR’s BCG? appeared first on AllOutdoor.com.

Read the full article here...
 

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I was taught and learned through experience that you lube wear surfaces. If you see a place that rubs and leaves a clear "track" of metal against metal you should lube it.
The hard part is finding which is the RIGHT lube for the job. I have two kinds of lube, oil and grease. Both are light weight lubes. The oil I use is a 50/50 mix of ATF (Dexron automatic transmission fluid) and kerosene. If a part rubs or rotates it gets oil. If you want to pay more, then Lubriplate # FMO-AW, specifically 350-AW. The smallest container sold is 1 gallon.
For loaded sliding surfaces I use grease (a 60/40 mix of my oil and light white Lubriplate grease) and the "over the counter" "best in class" is Lubriplate "SFL" NLGI #0. Use it as it comes out of the can.
Lubricants work best with an extremely light film. Often a lint free cloth with oil or grease on it is all you need for both oil and grease. If you apply it in any other way wipe it with a cloth to remove any excess. Eventually you will just use the cloth.
 
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