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Discussion Starter #21
BSN , Buddy , NO OFFENSE, but thats probably why you don,t run a machine shop anymore. Anyone who spends any real time in my trade will see good , well trained people make the slightest mistake and get hurt really bad or worse yet, hurt some one else. Do you guys even read the posts. When did I ever say I stripped a damn screw. I was trying to avoid something like that happening by asking an obviously knowledgeable man like Mr.Belk .But you could always ask Dakker , he seems to have all the answers.JUST JOKING DAKKER!
 

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The Troll Whisperer (Moderator)
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Just another bit of unsolicited advice - I've run into instances of screws being too long when installing scope mounts. As Belk pointed out, some were stopped short by the barrel threads into the receiver ring and some extended into the receiver blocking the bolt. Check lengths to assure the screws bottom out with the heads seated in the mount holes.
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Wow, Louie, you seem to have some anger issues....

It would have taken far less time to get a dial caliper out, measure one of the plug screws, and then hold up to a thread gage, than to type the rant you posted.

And no offense to Jack - he's quite knowledgeable - but I suggested Brownell's because they sell gun parts / accessories for EVERYTHING, and other than the manufacturer, would be the people in this country most likely to get it right, on the first try. Taking someone's word for it, on the internet, seems like a good way to get it wrong if you don't know the people involved.

And you'd still have to not be ham-fisted enough, to tear up the screws when installing them by over-tightening, or getting them cross-threaded, etc.

By the way, my grandfather was a WWII vet also, but he didn't "bust heads" when someone asked him what the thread size was on some random part, on one of his antique cars, that left the factory pre-ANSI standards. Model T starter screws are quarter - 24, you won't find those at the big box stores, and you won't know this till you get one up next to a thread gage and look. If it goes in the hole reasonably smoothly, it will work. Scope screws aren't space shuttle parts.

So take a deep breath, and you can leave out how tough you are, how you'd bust all our heads then fire us, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #24
Mike G, You seem like a descent person, so do me a favor and go back and read Darkker's first post on this thread. Then try for a minute and look at that in context from my prescriptive. I do not post or do the internet chatting stuff, hardly at all. My former GS and friend past away about 10 years ago now. He died from MS. It was not pretty. Darkker talks about being born with 2 left crippled elbows and not being able to feel a screw thread , or something to that extent. Ya well watching my buddy Tom lose his ability to do the job he loved, man , he couldn't even shake your in the end. Can you imagine if it was someone like him that would got that response or one of our brave men or women whom happen to have a disability of any sort, especially a limb. Man that really rubbed me the wrong way.

My aunt is retired now but she used to run a house for physically and some mentally challenged adults. They were family to us and lot of them would unfortunately passed away from whatever disease they were born with. So here I am basically only exchanging posts with Mr. Belk and this happens. I'll even try to give Darker the benefit of the doubt and maybe he probably meant no offense, but you know these boards are most likely browsed by disabled people, no matter how they ended up that way.

Things are much different when your eye to eye. People are really bad to each other behind these screens. It's a lot different when you have to see the consequences of your words in real time.

The comments about my Grandfathers and Dad are not to brag, far from it. Those men were damaged from there experiences. They were hardened mentally from what they saw. They didn't see themselves as heroes, I did!

So if you guys want me out , that's fine, I just came on here looking for some advice

Thanks
 

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I have had screws that that did not have a full thread form on the screw. These went into the hole very hard and felt like they were cross threading, but looked straight. It took close inspection with a loop to see that there had been a problem with the roll form machine or a process skipped. New screws fixed that issue.
 

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Nobody would believe how many epoxied-in 6-32 electrical box screws gunsmiths have to drill out of some very nice guns. Tasco put out a bunch of mounts with half threaded screws that messed up a bunch of guns. Redfield made their own screws until the Allen socket screws took over. They are revered in custom gun circles. Very sharp and well done and heat treated. Williams Gunsite also made great scope screws.

Gun screw threads are some REAL oddballs. 1/4-25 tang screws on Springfields and M70s?. Whitworth 55 deg vee threads on Mauser barrels? 10TPI square on Springfields and Enfields. 3/16-32 in several tang screws for Lever actions....

I asked the manager of Ace Hardware if he ordered that cardboard box of assorted scope mount screws (rings are different than mounts) special or was that part of the franchise inventory. He said every Ace in the country should have the same box.
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Mr Belk, I'm sure you seen a lot hack jobs over the years. Speaking of Williams Gunsite , I only live about 45 mins away from them. Man , I thought that place was something else whenever my dad or grandfather let tag a log. Things really went down hill when GM starting pulling out of Flint. All those GM execs had a lot custom rifles done there.

You know speaking about strange threads on guns. Back in late 80s I was working at a Tool Shop and my Dad needed a barrel blank threaded. The owner was pretty good about letting us stay after on a Saturday and do want we called " a government job" , which referred to our own stuff. Anyways the GS that was doing his rifle conversion could not thread the barrel. He had a small lathe, either a Southbend or Le Blond, I can't recall, but he said he could not turn metric threads. The thread they gave me was 22mm x 1.5mm. The cnc was not available, I only had access to a late 60s made Clausing Colchester. I think it was a 15x60. The lathe had glass scales on it for x and z axis, with digital readout. You don't see that much, at least not back then. The problem was it had a inch lead scew, even though the headstock would allow you set, or pick for the correct thread pitch in mm .Clausing did make metric lead screws, but we sure didn't have one.

Not wanting to let my dad down I marked the Chuck and Headstock for reference, put a travel indicator on the apron as a back up to the readout and with lathe off, but feed and lead screw engaged, I rotated the chuck and low and behold I got .059. That was the best way I could be damn sure the thread pitch was correct. Worse then telling my dad that I could not thread his barrel would have been scrapping it.

The big problem was that any time you disengage the lead screw the threading dial was useless and you could never pick the thread up again. Being stubborn about doing this I threaded the hole barrel without ever disengaging the lead scew. As the tool bit got into the relief cut between the threads and barrel shoulder I would simultaneously reverse the lathe feed and back out the cross slide to clear threads on the way back. Thank god for that readout! I think the thread was 60 degrees included if i recall right. All these years latter and I never asked my dad what kind of mauser it was. I guess I just assumed it was a 98. Didn't really care back then, females were important.

I read that 98s are 12 tpi so do you know what type of action I actually threaded that barrel for?
 

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Discussion Starter #28
At that some shop we made a lot of custom cutting tools for Bendix, Trw, CMI, and Ford. Are tooling could cut all critical surfaces at almost the same time on brake calipers and piston heads to name a few. We used a lot of acme threads on are tooling , both 8tpi and 12tpi , and we custom made lock rings to match. They looked just like a hornady die lock rings, but much larger. I always wondered who copied who?
 

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The Hog Whisperer (Administrator)
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Well, decide if you want advice, or if you want the manufacturer's drawings. I'm kinda confused as to your insistence that no one can make a part except from the drawing in a machine shop, but you want random answers from people on the internet (who don't have the drawings) and you didn't much like the suggesting of calling the largest gunsmithing supply outfit in the country (Brownells).

So my advice is to get a little less thin-skinned, and maybe realize folks are giving you fairly decent advice, for free.
 
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