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been a couple bluff charges and one attack on the ranch i work at all summer and hunt all fall, a couple griz in the area (the one attack) and black bears very common, along with mountain lions :( , i have never have carried before but now realize the need for it ha, but i narrowed to a double action 44 or a glock 20 in 10mm, just wonderin what you guys all think and any advantages or disadvantages to either? thanks
 

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been a couple bluff charges and one attack on the ranch i work at all summer and hunt all fall, a couple griz in the area (the one attack) and black bears very common, along with mountain lions :( , i have never have carried before but now realize the need for it ha, but i narrowed to a double action 44 or a glock 20 in 10mm, just wonderin what you guys all think and any advantages or disadvantages to either? thanks
Both are great choices IMHO. I've carried both and also a 41 mag at various times.

I have an EAA Witness P Carry w/ 10mm Double Tap, 200 gr WFN bullets at about 1300 fps. THis gun, w/ a full 10 round mag, weighs less than a 44 mag N frame SW. I have lighter hp bullets in another mag so it's a truck gun on the way up to hunt and a bear gun when I swap out the mags.

The 44 mag would have a bit of an edge in stopping power for griz, but I'm liking the lighter weight, flatter shape, higher capacity and ability to throw out a rapid follow up shot that the 10mm auto offers, as I'm not often in griz country.

But if I'm going into for sure griz country, I'll take the 44 mag or a 45 colt revolver that tosses 300 grain bullets at the 1300 fps. It's not that I don't trust the semiauto, I guess I trust the big revolver a little more.
 

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I'd probably carry my Redhawk. Makes a better club when it runs dry!
 

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Other than a Grizzly 44 mag or Magnum Reasearch .50 AE I don't think there is a pistol that could be condidered as "enough gun" when it comes to large bears- certainly not a 10 mm. A S&W .45 Colt Mountain Gun or .45 Colt Blackhawk would be the lightest, Otherwise, a Readhawk or Super Redhawk or even a Ruger "Alaskan" in .454 would be good choices if you must have double action.
 

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Well, we seem to have black adn brown bears up here in Alaska. They like to fish the same spots I do some of the time.

Ruger Redhawk in .45 Colt loaded with 300 grain hardcast bullets at a little over 1000 fps would do the job.

Hey! That's My gun! ;)
 

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The visions I have of a bear or cat attack are not far removed from an attack by a human, it will be a close encounter with extreme terror that occurs in milli-seconds. In my humble opinion, there is no pistol (semi-auto handgun) that would help me feel safer against a bear threat. My personal choice would be a six-shot wheel gun of .41 Magnum or larger and loaded with a good soft-point lead bullet. A good shoulder holster or a high-ride, snug-fitting hip holster would be my choice too because if you're working you don't want it to be too much of a bother or you'll put it somewhere to far from your hands to be of much value.

My first choice of defense in dealing with creatures that can maul me is to avoid the encounter all together! With a human threat you have the elements of thought and reason involved. You really don't have this with critters. The knowledge of superior armament, or even a weapon in general, may cause a human to rethink. A shot at 6' or less, no manner where it lands, may take the fight out of a human or surely un-nerve him but an animal does not have that factor. The sight of a 105mm Recoilless Rifle on your 4-wheeler will have no effect on detering an animal and if a wild animal engages you in an attack you are most likely going to have to kill it to disengage it.

While we have black bears here, wild feral hogs are our most dangerous critter in the woods and I have seen what little effect a .40cal Glock has against them! Many a penned domestic hog has been killed with a .22LR but the things we have down here would spit such a pewny round back at ya! A .41 Ruger, or larger, and a big tree with low limbs is my personal choice for hog defense but they generally avoid you so its seldom necessary. Heck, they are hard to get close to when you WANT TO!

Just my thoughts.
 

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In case some of you are confusing a 10mm w/ a 40 SW, they're as different as a 38 SP and a 357 mag.

The 10mm gives up little to a 41 mag in the most powerful loads. When I said a 200 gr hardcast at 1300 fps, I wasn't exagerating. This is a hunting load.

I would carry a 10mm auto for bear protection over a 44mag single action revolver.

Still...would carry the large double action revolver, if I knew there were grizz around.
 

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Either would be good, if you want light there are a few options there, the S&W 329PD is pretty light, as is the Taurus Tracker - I wouldn't shoot that one much. The Redhawk and Super Red Hawks are the sturdiest revolvers around. If you don't reload, the .44 Mag is the only way to go. I know that Doubletap and Buffalo Bore make specialty loads, but you can't shoot them much without totally breaking the bank. The .44 Mag is a proven bear stopper.
 

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Minimum 44 Mag in a revolver. No offense to anyone, but, if my butt is on the line, I would not carry an automatic....and, I like auto's, especially the Colt 45 ACP! If you choose an auto it should be thoroughly tested, and you should have 100% faith that it will function reliably under all conditions!!! A Ruger Super Blackhawk, Redhawk, Super Redhawk, Freedom Arms, and I am sure there are others out there, that can handle stout heavy bullet loads is all I would put my life on the line with, and heck, that might not even work!!! There has been much discussion on this forum over the years about what it takes to stop a charging bear, and the difference between what a cartridge can do under "hunting" conditions, and what the same cartridge is capable of under a "charge" condition. By listening to what other folks have shared on this forum (yes, I do listen and learn), it is my belief, that a rifle in the "proper" caliber, or a shotgun with some of Gates slugs would be my first line of defense. The handgun is only a last ditch effort if the rifle/shotgun doesnt get the job done.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Minimum 44 Mag in a revolver. No offense to anyone, but, if my butt is on the line, I would not carry an automatic....and, I like auto's, especially the Colt 45 ACP! If you choose an auto it should be thoroughly tested, and you should have 100% faith that it will function reliably under all conditions!!! A Ruger Super Blackhawk, Redhawk, Super Redhawk, Freedom Arms, and I am sure there are others out there, that can handle stout heavy bullet loads is all I would put my life on the line with, and heck, that might not even work!!! There has been much discussion on this forum over the years about what it takes to stop a charging bear, and the difference between what a cartridge can do under "hunting" conditions, and what the same cartridge is capable of under a "charge" condition. By listening to what other folks have shared on this forum (yes, I do listen and learn), it is my belief, that a rifle in the "proper" caliber, or a shotgun with some of Gates slugs would be my first line of defense. The handgun is only a last ditch effort if the rifle/shotgun doesnt get the job done.
i would love to carry a slug gun but being horseback, on four wheelers, and on foot fixin fence and sprayin all summer, i cannot carry anything except a pistol
 

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mthunter; I envy your lifestyle! I would just go with something that will deliver the power and reliablity necessary to keep you safe. Anything bigger, better, more powerful would be a plus. I have heard of big bears being killed with everything from the 22LR on up, but I wouldnt want to try it!!! In the end, the decision is up to you and it would be better to have "something" than nothing at all! Keep doing your research, and I am sure you will find something suitable for your needs.
 

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Without a doubt, I'd take the Glock 20 and pack a couple of spare mags. You could then unload about 45 rounds at the offending critter with the Glock while you were fumbling with a speedloader for a wheel gun after shooting 6 or 5! Not to mention, the Glock would be easier to carry. Be sure to run through a few hundred of your carry rounds for practice, including holstering, unholstering, changing mags, etc.

I've done a fair amount of hunting with a Model 29-2 but still feel that for the situation you mention, I'd choose the 10mm!
 

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My first choice of defense in dealing with creatures that can maul me is to avoid the encounter all together! With a human threat you have the elements of thought and reason involved. You really don't have this with critters. The knowledge of superior armament, or even a weapon in general, may cause a human to rethink. A shot at 6' or less, no manner where it lands, may take the fight out of a human or surely un-nerve him but an animal does not have that factor. The sight of a 105mm Recoilless Rifle on your 4-wheeler will have no effect on detering an animal and if a wild animal engages you in an attack you are most likely going to have to kill it to disengage it.

While we have black bears here, wild feral hogs are our most dangerous critter in the woods and I have seen what little effect a .40cal Glock has against them! Many a penned domestic hog has been killed with a .22LR but the things we have down here would spit such a pewny round back at ya! A .41 Ruger, or larger, and a big tree with low limbs is my personal choice for hog defense but they generally avoid you so its seldom necessary. Heck, they are hard to get close to when you WANT TO!

Just my thoughts.[/QUOTE]


A friend and his guide shooting a 375 [email protected] and 458 WM hit a charging Kodiak with a total of 12 solid, body shots having it expire at their feet. A carnivore moving on adrenalin can take alot more lead than any handgun can deliver.....as can a big hog. Whatever you get, use premium bullets designed for maximum penetration! Alot of people think an automatic is prone to failure while a revolver is fool proof. All branches of the military, incl' SFOs use 'em. Best thing about the Glock.....pull the trigger, either hand, it goes bang, many times and quickly!
 

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A round of 357mag 158 JHP thru the eye will stop and scramble just about any threat if there that close.

I like to reach out and touch them with my 338win mag from a distance but they never seem to really move after that for some reason. They seem to hate eatin those 225gr bullets but the 338 does serve them up really well.
 

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I've never been charged by a bear. Only had a black sow pop it's jaws as the cubs crawled up a tree, while I was digging the 44 mag out of my pack.:eek: Fortunately, the cubs scurried back down the tree and they were all off to unknown places.

I would sure pick a double-action revolver over an automatic where you just have to pull the trigger. I realize some autos can be carried cocked-and-locked without fumbling for a safety, but seems to me the DA revolver is more foolproof. And in much more powerful rounds, and of more importance, much better sectional density of the bullets.

From what I've read about bear attacks, you'd be lucky to get off 5 or 6 rounds.
 

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Would Someone........

.......like me to post the TOTAL foot pounds of energy that I can release from my Glock 20 without reloading another mag.

How about the difference in time that it takes someone to reload a single action,or for that matter a double action revo,vs. me, to dump and reinsert another 15rd Glock 20 mag ?? -----pruhdlr
 

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What would have more effect 5 or 6 holes 11 mm wide 4 to 6 feet long or 15 holes 10 mm wide 1 to 2 feet long. Think of a human shot over and over with a .25 acp or a few times with a .357. There is no comparison. The 300 plus grain LBT will penetrate and destroy like nothing else.
 

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I carry a glock 29 10mm for all matters of personal protection against man and beast alike. Lord help the man that would ever look into the eye of that gun!! Lord help me if I'd ever have to turn back a P.O.'ed bear with it. And all we have are blackies. BIG blackies. But no grizz. Volume of fire will be of little help to you if you are ever charged. If you get a shot off at all, it will be the duty of that first round to take out the bear's CNS. If the bear's determined to mess you up, he will do it short of a bullet in the brain or spine. Toward that end, my minimum choice for a dedicated P.O.'ed bear thumper would be a .44 Rem Mag with 300 gr. hard lead cast. I'd be way happier with a .454 or a .460.......either of those with hard lead cast, as well. Penetration is all important. One thing to consider with the Glock 20: In order to run hard cast through it, you really should throw in an aftermarket barrel. Glock gets antsy when folks shoot cast down their octagonally rifled barrels.
 
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