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Discussion Starter #1
 Is the 141 Remington action in a 35 rem. strong enough for todays hot loads? I thank you boys for any input.
 

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Hi, Jack1:
  I'm taking a guess here, but I would think that the 141 is strong enough. The .35 Remington is limited to 35,000 psi by SAAMI, which is pretty low for a 20th century smokeless cartridge. The two weakest guns factory chambered were a Stevens lever action and the peculiar Standard pump - auto. (That's another story in it's self.) The Remington's pretty common even yet and I don't think any of the factories or reloading manual publishers would put out anything a 141 couldn't handle. If fact, several manuals mention the 141 and the other early Remingtons, but don't mention any precautions about loading them. The older Speer manuals like my #7 have some very hot loads and not just in .35 Remington. Avoid them.

 The standard .35 Remington load is a 200 grain round nose with 36.0 grains of IMR 3031 behind it. The Remington Core-Lokt will expand at lower velocity (or longer range) than the Sierra or Hornady. The Speer 180 grain Flat nose is my second choice for a bullet.

 Get IMR's free manual for loads that are a little hotter.
<a href="http://www.imrpowder.com/

YEE" target="_blank">http://www.imrpowder.com/

YEE</a> HAWW!! It's online now !!!!! :eek:
<a href="http://www.imrpowder.com/rifle/35r_1_data.html

Bye" target="_blank">http://www.imrpowder.com/rifle/35r_1_data.html

Bye</a>
Jack
 

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Jack,

No!  This rifle was known in the past for having a propensity to develop headspace, even with factory loads.  The problem is that the steel of the receiver is not very hard compared to todays metals, and the locking lug does not have a lot of area bearing on the receiver's locking recess.  If you compare the locking area to most semi-auto/slide shotguns which operate at much lower pressures, you will note the 141 has much less locking area.

Now the good news!  Even at standard pressures the .35 Rem. is a very effective deer cartridge.  A 200 gr. or so cast flat point like the RCBS gas checked bullet or soft point bullets made for this cartridges velocities will be all you need.

Make a comparison, assuming you are handloading fir this gun and using single base powders.  To get an increase of 100 F.P.S. (5%) you need to increase the charge a like 5% which will give aprox. a 10% pressure increase.  Your 35,000 P.S.I. load just became nearly 39,000 P.S.I. for only 100 F.P.S.  This isn't a good trade, especially when you will shorten your rifles useful life to probably only a few hundred rounds at best.

I have three .35 Rems. at this time, a 141 and two Model 8's.  I have hunted with them and they are really fun, but loads never go over the 2050-2100 range that this cartridge has been loaded to for nearly a century now.  I have a 1944 Gun Digest which, I believe, was the source of an interesting observation about the .35 Rem.  It was commented in that item that, if anything, the .35 Rem was more rifle than needed for Elk!  This was considered to be a quite powerful cartridge at one time.
 

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Hi, Guys:
  Looks like 36.0 grains of 3031 is the place to stop. That works out to 32,000 psi. It's 1975 - 2000 fps in my Marlin.

Bye
Jack
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for information. I know the 35 is a nice deer round.  I just wanted some extra push for pigs out to about 100 yards.
 
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