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Discussion Starter #1
Well it took a while but my 1886 is finally back and reworked for the 45-90. I have not done much load development as of yet. I have used the PMC factory 300gr cast bullet loads. They are very light only running 1350 fps. I have worked up 1 300 gr load so far. It is the sierra 300gr HP over 63grs. of Reloader 7. This is a max load and exits the muzzle of my extra-lite at 2450 fps. Yes it does kick a tad. So far no problems the gun feeds beautifully and shoots well.

Anyone else working up loads? I would be interested in the reults you've gotten. I have the usual reference books and am waiting to get some of the more medern powders like VV N-133 and AA2015 and try them as well. I need to order some Beartooth cast bullets and give those a try to. I had the chamber done with a fairly long thraot so hopefully all the designs will work in it.


Garth
 

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My 1886 ELTD is of 1918 vintage, so I've been somewhat relunctant to load it to it's full potential. My max loads are 66/IMR3031/300 Barnes, or 64/4895/300 Barnes. With the 350 Hornady 54/4198 works well also. I reduce the powder about 20% when loading lead. I have a big supply of Laser-cast 300LFNs,and they work equally well in both 45-70 and 90. Oh yeah, I use Starline brass, trimmed to 2.405". Large rifle primers are of your preference.
Who did the work on your gun? I am considering the same job on my Miroku 1886 EL. Either that or the Browning 71 carbine to 50-110. I've talked with Dave Clay on both these conversions. He says they are no sweat.
Best regards, Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #3
1886

Bear Country Sports in Kodiak Alaska did the work for me. I use Starline brass also. I didn't know you could do the full length 50-110 on the 71 action. I thought about doing that on the 1886 but this gun was already in progress. I also thought of necking the 50-110 down to 45 sort of a super 450 Alaskan. If he can do that work on a 71 I might be interested I have a Browning 71 carbine in 348 AI. Where can I find Dave Clay?

Garth
 

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Garth, since the .348WCF is based on the 50-110WCF the conversion of the 71 is a natural. Both cases have a .610 rim diameter. They also share same base dimensions, the difference other than shape is length only. The .348 is 2.255 and the .50-110 is 2.4, like the 40-82,45-90, etc. You can reach Dave Clay at [email protected]. He is currently working on designing just such a cartridge as you suggested. By now it may be fully developed. He will be happy to answer any questions that you may have concerning cartridge conversions.
Best regards, Mike
 

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Garth,
I've got an 86 Extralite at Daves Shop being converted to 450/110. As Mike said it is based on a full length 50/110 case necked down to 45 caliber. Tim Sundles at Buffalo Bore Ammo did the initial load development. Tim got 2400 fps with a 420 grain cast bullet. Basically that round is a ballistic twin to a 458 Win. in a lever gun. Should be lots of fun to shoot.
Jeff
 

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Jackhammer, Sounds like the Real Deal! Where will you get the dies and at what cost? I like Dave's development, but will probably stick with the 50-110. Dont'cha know that will KICK!!! Be prepared, could be nosebleed city. Keep us posted on the results.
Besto, Mike
 

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Mike,
Dave makes his own dies. They are included with the rifle. I am going to send a dummy cartridge off to Lee to get them to make a factory crimp die as well, Costs $30.00. Dave installs a removable muzzle brake for use at the bench or with full power loads, should keep recoil to a managable level. Also installing kickeze pad and full length mag tube to add some extra weight up front. Considered mercury recoil reducers but Dave pursuaded me to wait and see what it is like before I add them, concerned about weakening the stock and altering the balance of the rifle.

By the way, you can't go wrong with the 50/110 promises to be a real hammer when loaded to modern pressures in a new rifle. I say go for it.
Jeff
 

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Jeff,
Way back when I used to own a 50-110, but traded it away when the ammo ran out and more couldn't be found. Was younger 'n dumber then. My LW 45-90 was made in 1918, so it can handle any loads that I care to make. My choice for the 50-110 will probably be a Browning 71, carbine version. We'll see.
Your gun should be the ultimate BIG HAMMER. There won't be any critters safe from that one.
Cheers, Mike
 
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